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UC SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY 
PRESERVATION MICROFILMING SERVICE 



Microfilmed 2002 



UC SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY 
PRESERVATION MICROFILMING SERVICE 



Los Angeles, CA 90095-1388 



6 inches 



Reduction Ratio: 17:1 



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qualit\'. 



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( Title 'l 7 U.S. Code). ' 



UC SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY 
PRESERVATION MICROFILMING SERVICE 



UCLA DAILY BRU 




LOS ANGELES 



CALiFOHNIA 




O 



UMME 




^ 




1 





SEPT. 1 




1 




#0379 





u 



DJUIY BRUIN 



Orientation 




-M 



k-i 



^ 



Health Care 
you've already 
Daid ror . . . 



Yes, as a registered UCLA student 
you have paid for the use of the 
Arthur Ashe Student Health and 
Wellness Center, where most ser- 
vices are FREE. So, visit our Web 
site tor more information, request 
an appointment or ask a health 
related question - 
www studenthealth.ucla.edu 



or call 825-4073 



ucia Ashe Center 



On Wesfwood Plaza next to the Wooden Center 



*< 



,t ^ 



.kC 



Daily Bruin 




-Nl l-T Ift V\ 



Ome homr to extensive 
pubiu trans|)<)rtdti()n. 1 os 
.\iigeles IS n<)v\ known as d 
tn>evvd\ ( \\\ S<'e pasf !S 



News 



MoiuIjs .hinr 2.') 2(Kll 



It s tiol out ttM'rt- 
Wh«'ii t«'«'liiiK th« 
Jwjt John \diin»s 
would swim naked 
in th«' H)tom<i( 
lnia|{in<- that and 
visit lis at 

uv\v\ (l<.iil\l)i'tiin iH \<\ (-(III 



1 



For new students, help is out there 



RESOURCES: V\()rksh()[)s. 
(H)ijnseliri^' aid transfers, 
trrshnien in adiustnient 



By ManwHe Ridwnk 

Daily Brum Senior Staff 

NcwLonicrv u> ihc qiutrlcr ^\s 
icm m.i\ tind liu'mst'KcN over- 
whelmed it the\ don I learn lo 
iii.in.ijje their lime hiii those v*ho 
attend academic workshops and 
counselinj; can.hone their college 
Mil \ \\a\ skills 

NV'hiie freshmen imisi adjust w 
college hie in general translcr 
studeirts used to the semester s\s- 
leni must learn to deal with the 
demands ol a lH-week schedule 

for tirst-vears cver\ihmg is 
new an\ wa\ saui lane! 

Munguia .i student .ittairs otticct 
in the f-*plish department (The 
guarier svstcmi presents more ot 
.1 challenge lor iraiislers I see 
them enrolling in too man> class 
es Thc\ re used to enrolling in 
four to live classes and we tell 
them not to enroll m more than 
three 

For iranster studen"! Devin 
Buries, now a lourth-year philoso- 
phy student 

the quarter ^^^^^^^^— i^— 
s\stem man 
dated a 

stricter siudv 
regime 
which ci>n 
trasled with 
what he 

described as a 
leisureK IK- 
week sNsieni 
at his prioi 
c o II e g e 

f verythmg 
went realK quicklv because I 
came from a semester system, it 
was like a marathon he said 




Award-seekers 
fvKl academic 



I III 



Steven Tattamachi, who graduated in June, seeks advice from a Letters and Sciences counselor 



"When I came here I 

had to keep on top of 

things to a much 

higher degree." 

Devin Buries 

Transfer student 



But when I came here I had to 
keep on lop ol ihmgs to a much 
higher degree I was trving l(< 
keep on it probabh more than 
necessarv 

T(> assist 
^^^^^^— ^— students with 
studv habits 
and classes 
I (I A otters 
n u m e r (> u s 
workshops 
and counsel- 
ing 

F a . h 
school the 
largest being 
the ( ollcge ol 
Letters and 
Sciences, has 
Its own counseling department 



Sm 



pa9«14 



TRAMSmomiiOTOANEWSCHOOL 

UCLA provides academK mources to help ftrnhnwn and transiier studenb eix the 
transition to tt>e University 



Academic Advancement Program 



Hil. nNiirt2S-14l1.IM,9«.R.lDSML 



CoveF Comnrans workshops 



Departmental counseling 



( jpM WW pNpanng fir (MM to pouiMf 
MM. MbbM Z03 CMei COMMHS. 
nMne:IZS-f91S,M-1h. 1p.m.-4pJii. F. Ipjn.Spjn. 



L&S counseling 



^flWKt UCUiiMWWBgDllKr 






Vli lOB . HfN.-Diilv Bn 



extra projects 

PROGRAMS: Membership 
in I (-I.\ (^ollc^'c Honors 
iidcis depth lo coiirsf^ load 



By MarccNe Ridiar^ 

Daily Brum Senior Staff 

I or students seekmi: special 
recognition up»>n gr.iduating 
I CIA the universit\ otiers \,iri 
oils honors opportunities to those 
will' m.iintain high grades while 
committing themseKes to other aca 
demic or extracurnculai protects 

F rom college and departmental 
honors to membership in iiatumal 
honi)rs societies, entering students 
ma\ participate in one or all ol the 
abo\e it eligible 

"The primarv goals ot the pro- 
gram are to provide the most chal 
lenging educational experience pos 
sible to students at I ( LA " said (i 
Jenniler Wilson director ot the 
( ollege ol Letters and Science 
Honors Pri>grams. stressing that 
the school otters a wide arra> ol 
honors courses and resinirces 
through seminars, tutorials anil 
independent research protects 

Students ma\ submit an applica 
lion lor (ollege Honofs when the\ 
appiv tor .idmission ti' I ( I A 

( ollege Honors h.is dillerciu 
requirements lc>r treshmen and 
tr.iiisler students, but biilh receive 
prioritv passes in course and hous- 
ing enrollment 

Students entering the uni\ersit> 
with 4 ' units or teuer must take 44 

See NMIMB, pafe 16 



ByTr 

Daily Brum Contributor 

Mi< luicl Sunian i\ <i prolcssm in ri)i 
( i>nimuni((ilii>n Studies il<'p<irinu'nl iiiul i\ h<\:i 
knoutj lor UinhinK lh< min><lii( loi \ ii>iir\i 
( omniunidition Stu<lu'\ ID 

H'luii lulvuc wintld vdu f/K la iiuominv siu 
tffnh II Vint; tn make lluii Iraiisilion fmni hii;h 
\(h<Ktl 1(1 (iillcgc ' 

Lhex have lo reali/e that high school is vcr\ 
dilTercnt trom college, especiallv in terms of 
WorkU»a^ 1 hey re probably used to doing a lit 
tie hfTof homewoFk and studying a little bit tor 
lests\but college is much more intense, much 
more m-depth They will read more than the% ve 
read bctorc. the tests will be more difficult Also 
their lives will be more unstructured, and it will 
Ix- up l(^ them to structure their overall lives 

// (I tiudfni cnntlls in one ol vnur dasMW wluii 
(Ic \itti cxpcri frnrti ifwm in icrm.s o/ studying 
limt ' 

Make sure that you re at class every time It s 
v»>ur responsibility lo be there l( you re not 
there you ccHild be missing something impor 
lant You should do the reMclings on time Vou 
should go to sections, ihey will help vou with the 




lU 



ORDS 
ofWISDOM 

A professor shares his thoughts as to how 
freshmen can adjust to academic Hfe at UCLA 



readings rhc tests are lair, yet challenging and 
It s not like high school where you could studv 
the night bclore the exam and do fine on it It 
you re going lo do well on the exam, you ve gi»i 
lo start planning weeks ahead and start review 
mg material It s )ust Uvi much for vou to master 
in one evening no matter how brilliant you are 
Nou ve got to plan and structure your work and 
work very hard 

H'luii \houUI (in iiuiiniinii studcni A/imi iihmui 
iht- rompcliliwm'w of itu' r/«v,w'\ and ol ih< oiho 
students at I (14' ii luii lip\ itin \(>ii i,»/i( ihcm 



ic \l(i\ im lop ill lliin{;\ 

It s a totally ditlerent pool than high school 
Most ot the students who come here did verv 
well in high school and thev were probablv the 
top students But they should keep m mind that 

all o( these other students wore also the top 
students ot their class You re no longer a big 
lish in a small pond Nou ve been thr(>wn inl(> a 
pond with a lot ot other big tish and because oi 
that you re going to have to work harder \ lot 
ot freshmen think that they could follow the 
same patterns thev dul in high sch(Mi| rhev go 



and thev lake then midterm and ihev re 
shiKked when thev find thev \e gotten a ( 
>ou should lust be .(Ware that that can happen 
Basicallv it s about working hard 

// \n(drnh mcil hcl/i /loii r/n 101/ s//t,'i,'(S/ 
(ippriHU hint; (I prolcssor ' V\'hal con lhi\ doU'vci 
help iiithidi III tilt Ucluri luiH ' 

I hey should )ust ci>me up b<."li)re class, during 
the break, alter class, or come to otTice hours or 
e-mail me I ni more than glad to give assistance 
\o anyone who asks tor it. and there are teaching 
.issistanis as well 

I (II ihiisi \iudinly t nniini; in not k now ini; u hal 
niiiinr^ U> piirsiu wluil ild\i(( Hould vou e'li 
ihi n' h help ihcni tind ihcir nii ht (ind mninr ' 

Most IK-vear-olds thev re.illv haven 1 expc-ri 
enced enough academically, iniellectuallv to 
kni>w exacilv what is interesting to them and 
wh.it thev want \o do with their lives I think it - 
a verv healthy stale ii> come in not kn(-wing 
what vou want lodo and to just taste a lot of dit 
terent classes lust look at the schedule ot class 
es and think Well that might be interesting to 
take lake Inglish classes, history classes biol 
ocv classes chemistrv classes, art classes lust 



See 



12 



\l(lll(ij\ lull) 



•2(K)| 



DdiK Brum Nrws 



Campus housing offers a variety of living 



• •lit 



BUILDINGS: KcsKlctKc li.ills iiiiix 
( ult'i t<' sociiil I)iith'rf1i»'s u hilt' 
Miitrs otlrr' older sliidfrils spiicc 



Hv Uura Rko 

DhiIv Hruiri (.onltiDuInr 

t >■ ;i« ',' 111. . Miiiii'. -iiiilcni-- I .■snk-n!i,il ii.ill- 

t.^ '\ir MK .spCiiCIIlt Ml.r .,'.I'- .K^CKllllL' I'' 
A hi, I ''ii'lJiIlL .; -'li^l.'l!' '^i upic- 

I »i, , iiiipu- ii.'ij^iiiL iiKiiuic- hiL'ii-i '>c i'.jli-- 

S::!i,,-- \ i;l,l-. I )•. \>- t I'l.l.'.' ,in>: !IU 
I I, • J..' '1 l!.' .. . .■:!.l!l IH'- ..ilKlli' . 

■ ;i, ,.iij I,-: ,■!:,. ,il Hijiiki-iiNli!;'' ,i '. i'.imIi 1 L.i: 
- . : ,'iKL-!i- \'k! I )-K.;i.: H.il! :- ^c'\c' 



IIIV! 



bathr»H>nis thai arc cleaned weekly 

l)\k^ii.i H.ill Ilk- IitnI hii!h riNC dorni built m The three SutiNei Village buildingxitler more 

!'»~"i eoiiNisis.it 1(1 Hours c.ah hDUMtij; about spacious rooms and aircondituining Ho\*cver. 
*() siudcnis Ro..ms . some say Sunse; is loo 

isolated and loneK 

I lived in Delta 
lerracc m\ first year 
,ind cvervone com- 
plained about hov» anti- 
s<Kial It was." said Lisa 
^mlnnla. a second-year 
business and economics 

student 

"Sociali/inj; in 

Sunset IS really what 

c.ich person m.ikcs o\ it, because (%made me go 

oui .ind betrieiki m»)rc pe(»ple on my lliH)r and in 

other dt>rms " she said 

Some second-year students prelcr lo live in 



'uniimu .iloiii; cilhci 
sklc ol the hallwa\ a 
IlmIuk' cli.ir.icleristk o! 
I )\ksira aloiic loslcr a 
social cm ironiiicni 

Richer Spii'ul and 
Hednck Halls lia\e 
north atui south v^nius 

uilti each rooni lacmu a . 

*iiank ^*.all 

1 \ei N ! csideiKe hall 
i!k1 suiic !catiiii-s r4-houi siuds lounues 

While lesuieike halls also lealLiie cvercisini; 
lacihties and eomnuiiuil bathrooms which the 
hoiisckeepiiiL' stall clean daiK Sunset \ illage 
|)e Ne\e Pla/a and the suites ha^e individual the suites citing privacv and a need tor more 



"Each dorm caters to a 
certain personality type." 

Jeremiah Blankenship 

Fourth-year biol6gy student 



I h h k wist- from top leh Sec ond yedt urban planning graduate stu 

j'-'nt Sonja EI-WahH participates m the Environmental Coalitions 

dip in hv Burma held in the spring Third year business student Joe 

O'Boyte and third year philosophy student Ndson Amador gather 

around the table in the play "How to Major in Poosball "Third-year 

politK al science and ChiQano studies student Vblanda Pendada 

teaches a workshop called "Better alone than in bad company ' 

Undergraduate Students Association Council President Karran 

Lane speaks with Lt Gov Cruz Bustamante about affirmative 

ac tion on the steps of Ackerman in March Members of Samahang 

Pilipino model traditional attire which they also wore during the 

groups c ulture night in May. Ryan CaNis and Tim McMuHen spray. 

paint a board at the Veritas forum in the spring 

ft 

Involvement can make 
university seem smaller 



MEMBERSHIP: Mud. iiK 
iii,i\ t'imi nil lp' ,iM < \ \ 
[i\ iMiniii:: -w t:,iiii/,iiiuiis 



I,' , V' ^ 1 ^ <M 



.11.: \1„'la.- ( .Iwi 



>- Rachel Makabt 

lai'v Hroir (int'ihiit> 




corfHorlable and spacioiu. living quarters 

Saxon and Hiich Suites, hidden behind 
Rieber knd Hcdrick Halls, provide students 
with apartment-style living <ind the amenities of 
dorm lite, such as dining hall privileges and fre- 
quent patrolling by ICLA's Community 
Service Officers 

But same students say the C'SO round^ div 
rupt privacy in the suites at limes 

■•Whei\ I lived in Hitch, there seemed to be a 
high amount ^^i (SiOs on duty." said Robby 
lanouye. a third-year molecular biology stu- 
dent 

Tanouye said he was written up twice whjie 
living in the suites, once when he was in a room 
where students were consuming alcoht)! and 
another time tor making tini much noise 

"They even threatened to kick xne out of the 




\i 



■ ■ ■Ml.l 111, 



' ■ . ; •■. iii.iL'c- iiu! p; Mv - issi- 

■i , ' >Uv ll ■.'Mlip- 

I ~I,M' al^ . M iMIll/.lllOI' .1' 

I I I \ 'V -. ^-i \ .e^ \ c.is\ ( ohn 

, ■. T I )u! iiir !iu ^iinii Hi ,j,,,,,i \i- a: he said I sh.ighian a third-vear \n independent group requires 

,; ,.,:> <■ >\\ci\ Miih:o. I ^ll.lL'hl.lli remsi.iUHl i ps\chobiolopv student Ihis is ,i anv combination ot three students. 

." "iMi: mipii- Ji,ipi^' 'I 'In NnK'n.in luiee wimpus but vou have \o lacuhv or staO lo state their inter 

• I,,! ••1-1.11;' \1;'.Ik.i siiuleir X-souaMop make It smaller and more pers<nial est in starting the group, and com- 

. 'h • 'Ik . ini whict' iMise-- on lau-ci option^ ir lot vourscll ' pleiion of a one-page registration 

isiihJK lualih A uriuip c.in eithei be indepen form These groups do not receive 

u!:i,.i 'iiii Mill I tu kr\ I sii^veediiiL' h. !i. 1- deni such .is religious oi political oft icc space nor can they apply for 

-•ii,lrn' .U' iH' .iKol'.ei! i.iiK ^ !h.i' \ou oi L'.ini/.ilions or oltKiallv regis- 

I"', si. 1 Ml ,t. Ill ' Sci I'MK iiisi .inoihei II) mini leied vv iih ,i vanipiis sponsoi 



DAILY 
BRUIN 



i»(lMf:linMltiylCu()c 
MKluHfAonr 



anMit 
:ShMn,iMK«inW«> 
KJybufn MMflp RictMids. Mctydr lunw^r 
: Mm Sinned 



(uMMfnn Onrqd ' 
■an: MMpmrarlirfiy 
f diMid '. titioi Anunb Hnrtm 



MEMan: xmraiKofein (hnsMorvMrs 
•mphtdWidiviMMvWkans 
MEMMim: UiMdHoMI)ni;Chir,«MnQ 



SfMbMarvonytMit/ ,^ 
AMMtMt Spam Man: Durnand ifuna Vyu- 

MaA^ t-jratyiMhtdunl 

SpamWiiarA. *»TV)(i[)v<jnHfm«ir' *a*'i 

• iio< los^Mllsoll (iimnndlflir 



rlimNqu 
AsMMMl B«|R Mwar Snn Awp 

Hhistralan: j^^-'hn.Vicioi^hm ttKjfmit 

ii "^i .mdiNal lonittvtr S(»p^ % Wane 



Photo tditof iiiOiy • ' him 

AMMttM flWlB MilQW. iJtnnw lur >9^Ma I « 

-tl*n«<*Dn« 

nwtoSOff: '-H-6,)iHoNi"*'M<ltrr ihiMiws 

-I»WJC 

dptrOMf: ^\&,[lna^) 
Cipy Ptf Utit k ■'f, M<(ipn»v in||v lYdon' 

•>'-'l- ■ ffcii.'jnii M*' Niitiolvy 
(Mfff Man: MI' Are h«j liirr Ptm. strvtvnr I»soi 



EMMMNallMKMr.minrU" - 



iuyifv\ 
Do^SaHMMHiir KwnyiMdnvii 

iijttiqhri hk MUntirw 

8w Uimpnl Hm L)*nOsot 

Ussidrt Onpiiy Vcouni I m ulwf WNnrv Shomrtf ■ 
OMMitfMaarAaMMhMaw: NKt 
(Unqrlo. Brun HoM^ liu fyrvWhrnry SlKiwln 

iMinin Vmtwii too 
mUtmtlmmmmmamr. (hmVDnMMUi 

OtncUkxr 
StphjnrM^rAixi 



OHriMlw 



Vjnrsva Hor".. Imny Rryft 



tMrdrBiuyr 
: fUt Lunv 
: Mntn Bi«wn. Arrt^ ujlxir 
i.tscMunquu.PwIvawM 
fan. Qpnaam aaMfv: MkIuh rv; ,iinn< 
MIS Sal^ ' 'wslnphri K*lr- irfliui : Iwrni .■«* Aln 
sm^iKi 
Sain EiHiy MMifH: ^rvoi > Knr' 




Daih Brum News 



Mopday. .lune 25. 2(M)I 



BRUmGOl TRANSIT PASS MLOT PinOGIIAM 



wimi nr ■■■■■! 

ndfthfBiglNiirBus 



iHumnintivM, UOAOMtfMKaidMljrwIfeeihiplP 




nap aot ^A'MV 



MMKi — wB i wm w atnt4«<a/»uw<a. - nt a W Miy* 



-J 

Buses provide cheap way to see LA. 



Students without 
cars can explore various 
areas usin^ public transit 



MCTCW CHf NA>Mty fcuMi 



By 

Daily Brum Staff 

hor students new to Lt>s Angeles 
exploring the city will be a weekend 
goal, but this aliM^ poses a challenge 
for those who do not own a car 

With only 22.000 parking spaces 
to accommt>date the mt»rc than 
65.000 laculiy. stall students 
patients and daily visitor^ at I '(LA. 
parking is al a premium, and the uni- 
versity ha*, been pursuing public 
transpi>rtation as an alternative 

Third-year computer science stu- 
dent All Tehrani made his way 
around Li>s Angeles via public tranv 
portation after his car accident 



"I would lake the Big Blue Bus.' 
he sai(J "It s really convenient 
because it s free "" 

Meipbers of the I'd A communi- 
ty can ride the Santa Monica Big Blue 
Bus system for free because of the 
BruinCio' program which allows 
them lo ride by swiping their Brum 
Cards. 



After recording more 

than 700,000 swipes, 

officials decided to 

extend (BruinGo!) for 

another year. 



Ilie Big Blue Bus system extends 
tr(»m I CLA west to the Santa 



Atvd 'A«i! 



Thr [>Mtv Brum MMi M1»4MW n publnhvd Mid 
copyriqhtKl by th» ASUCLA ConHnurHcMion^ 
BoMd All nqtns arp igfivxi Mvprmtmg at antf 
m«t#r**l tn 1tx« puMcMlon wrttVKJ* Ih* Mflllvii pvv 
mttwon of ttw CoffivnunicMiofn tosnJ n Uficlly 
pratiilMtM) Thr ASUCIA CanvnunkMion\ SoaR) 
luNy liiBWIHI, Hw UnManNy •* CalitomwA poOcy or 
non-^ncnmrnrnton Tlw tlu ri . nl mMlu r^wn^ Thp 
nqtn to >«|»ct or ii oiri Wy ari w nmng whov conimi 
dtyii n iinjiai on Itia baii i of ancattry. color nation 
«i onqin rarv n N;i u i . AtaMNy. a9r i» oi i*>ua< 
nnmiation Ttw ASUCLA C o ffwwumcatiom toafti 
has t madM grwwanca pcocadtav tor rnoMnq 
com>lain>t avimti any of its puMcaltam fat a 
copy of l«w camplx' pracariurv conurt ttw puHi 
I 1 1* Hgtt l iho*! Ha* All mwm Itiai 
i^ia Oafly ■mm ac in^apvnovmvy 
paid putofications and do not wpact Hw irtwiw w 
itw idmmal •oanl oi ttw %ia*l 

MBBfekMltaialBbC* MM*. 

>.MM.»w»iMw»i».aia»wrii< 111 »aii, 




Ids Angeles is home 
to a compHcated 
netuiorH of freeways 
that cater to the 
city's 'car culture' 



t>» metropous 



Daily Bnun S«nior Staff 

E«ch fall. li( LA students ride 
buses hoided for footbiill games 
at the Rose Bowl, getting there by 
way of the oldest freeway in the 
Western United Stales 

When completed in 1940. the 
Pasadena Freeway, originally 
called the Arroyo Seco Parkway, 
represented efficiency and free- 
dom One could jet through Us 
tunnels and wind around its turns 
al high-speeds while traftk: contin- 
ued to clog surface streets 

But Pasadena's was only the 



first freewayfc a region that 
would come titebc known for 
them Today, us people associate 
New York with its skyscrapers 
and San Francisco with the 
Golden Gale Bridge, they identify 
Los Angeles by its freeways and 
cars. 

"We're a car culture here." said 
UCLA policy studies Professor 
Jorja Prover wid. "You own your 
own car. you are your own car. 
your car is part oC^our idenlily " 

While many Angeienos engage 
in love aflairs with their cars, stu- 
dents often find themselves stuck 
m traffic after fmnball games on 



thK freeway that was once so 
speedy and efTicient And mMry. 
like Prover. wonder why the city 
does not have a belter public 
transportation system. 

"Los Angeles does not have 
public transportation." said 
Prover. who used to work for the 
Metropolitan Transportation - 
Authority "The MTA is a joke ' 

She called attempts to establish 
better bus and rail transportation 
"half-hearted' and "perfuncKv 

But during the early 20th cen- 
tury, the city featured one of the ^ 
most extensive public transp«irta- 




tion systeas m the country the 
"red ca**lines 

ia 1890. LA' was a relatively 
small city of just over 50,000 petv 
pie But a new arrival lo the 
region. Henry Huntington, a 
nephew of railrtud tycoon ( ollis 
Huntington, boasted of the city's 
big future 

According lo historian Carey 
McWilliams in his book 
"'5»oulhern raliforma An Island 
on ttie Land.' Huntington once 
said: "I believe Los Angeles is des- 
tined to be the most important 
city in the country, if not the 
world It can extend m any direc- 
tion as far as you like" 

And with Huntingjon's help, 
the city spread 

He founded the l.os Angeles 
Railway, which competed I'icrcely 
with other regn>nal rail lines 
before he convilidated them into 
the Pacific Flectric Railway in 
1901 During that year, all rail cars 
were painted red 

By thai time, inte.urban rail 
lines connecting LA. Pasadena. 
Hollywood. Santa Monica and 
San Bernardino already existed, 
and the city grew outward with 
the rail lines 

In the I92(K. at its pinnacle, the 
Pacific FIcctric red car system 
covered I. MM) miles o\ track m 
LA. Oangc. Ventura. Riverside 
and San Bernardino counties 

But success for the rail hnes 
was short-lived 

Aul»> ownership was lo\» in the 
I9HK, but increased during the 



The freeway systenn was lirst irrtroduced to Los Angeles to make getting arourxj more efficient 
but with today's heavy traffic, drivers may find themseh/es nx>vir>g at a sk)wer pace than desired. 






itmm 



Monica Pier, east lo Beverly Hills, 
and as far south as the Li>s .Angeles 
International Airptm 

Bruintio^ IS among the least 
expensive transit prt>grams because 
Santa Monica lines are so ec(»nomi- 
cai " Donald Shoup-. director <»t the 
Institute oi Transportali(»n Studies, 
said- to the Daily Bruin in an article 
dated April 2 

because not all lines pass I 'CLA. 
students can transfer between buses 
throughout the system by asking the 
duver lor a tran.sler coupon, which is 
also free A student wi.shmg to take 
the Big Blue Bus to areas east of canv 
pus, tor example, would have to 
change buses since only Lines I. 2. ^, 
X and 12 head lo LCLA' while lines 
.'^, " and 1.^ run east to Beverly fliHs 

Iransportation Services imple- 
mented the Bruintio' program dur- 



Students can 
obtain work, 
options using 
UOA system 



XMS; Traininp is ohen 
pnnided; \SLCL.\ may 
start at $6.50 per hour 

DaHy Bruin Senior Staff 

As the schiK)! year rolls in and the 
money, rolls out. tlnding a job is a 
necessity that makes Us way to the 
top of many Brums lo-d«>li.sts 

Getting a |ob d»>esn i have to be J 
tieadache it one kn«>ws where to 
look. Cioing to the t arcer Center. 
Human Resources, or strolling 
around campus can reveal the possi- 
bilities 

For freshmen and transfer stu- 
dents living in on-campus housing 
without a car. employment at UCLA 
comes with the perks of flexible 
hours and a student-friendly work- 
place, say many current employees 

"I like the proximity." said Carina 
Yuen. KerckhofT Coffeehouse senior 
student supervisor who enjoys the 
bustling hot spot 

Though Yuen, a fourth-year psy- 
chology student, was initially attract- 
ed to an on<ampus job because oi its 
convenience, she has since discov- 
ered another reason to stay 

"What I found after I started 
working here, it s really nice to have 
a second horn* '" she-said "On such a 
big campus it's really nicx* to have a 
place where you know everyone and. 
everyone knows you 

KerckholT ( offeehousc is among 
the sli>res and campus eateries run 
b> the Associated Students of 
licLA 4.ikc most ASU( LA posi- 
lions. with the exception of manager- 
ial or lab assistant positions, workers 
have a starting pay of $6 50 per hour. 

With ni> prior work experience. 
Yuen like all incoming employees, 
was hired not so much on skill, but 
work cthic 

"I didn't know how to work a reg- 
ister, but we train our workers." she 
said. 'We don t just throw ymi in 
there '■ 

After two years as an employee, 
she now holds the highest student 
position available 

Yuen, who began her search her 
freshman year with a service-related 
job in mind, said she found her 
match at the Human Resources 
Center 



SwfVKV 



to 



4 \l(»ii(lj\ hii« i.'i 2(KII 



l)ail\ Brum Srws 



. Dditv Brum Nc^s 



\U.iHl<n, .Jun«- 25 '2<HH .'> 



■wp 



Crime a legitimate albeit preventabler threat at UCLA 



VIOLENCE: liciriiicinilioiis 
will IcsxMi oDf's charurs 
(>ri>('((trnin#: \ i.clirni/cd 



By 

Daily Brum Staff 

I ii.>,limcii .ind li.inslL'r siudcni- 
hu^\ kMriimi! I ( I X ^ N-tlap ■;hi)iild 
K.' .m.irc ol .1 c.tmpiis problem that 
tumhi no! nIc.iI their ».hool Npint. bui 
ihcii vv.illci^ ln^lc.lct 

( .iinpu-- crime i> a regular iveur- 
leiice .11 laiiie uni\cr>itie> like I (LA. 
v\liere J.iviime popjilalion can rciich 
''I I. (KM I. accordmg lo universil) pt>lice 
V\i.re .ipeii lo the general public 
aiKl am one can come on campus. 
>aid N.incN dreensiein commumt\ 
^eI\ll.e^ director lor I (PI) 

III :(HKi [ (IM) recened l.O"^" 
reports ol ihett. making it the most 
ci>mmvin crime committed at I (LA 
I Ills number excludes aulonu)biles 
and bicvcles. which are counted sepa- 
ralelv 

\mong the mi>st common items 
sMJen arc laptop computers cellular 
phones hack 

p.iik^ ,mJ park _^^^_^^^^^^ 
iniiperniiis 

I'oIilc saiil 

iii.iir. Uie'!- 'K^ u: 

uilLl! iVWlCIs 

Ic.nc ilicii propel 
\\ iiiuinciklci.i 

li; soiiic 

L.iscs, sliidcnis li- 
the lihi,ir\ v\il: 
ic.iNc Ihei! laptop 
behind assuming "' 
thai i: \v_ill be there 

altc ihev go the rest looi^j or lake a 
bleak s,iid Robert Sadeh aime pre- 
tention otficCT lor I (1'l) It also 
happens in the residence halls, where 
students will go aw.iv lor a while leav- 
ing then doors propped open or 
unlocked 

I .ir added protection, students ma> 
register their computers into the 
Securitx Ir.icking ot OtVice I'ropcriN 
progr.im otherwise known as SIOP. 
which embeds a hi^K pressurued 
identilicalion plate onto a computer It 
can then bt,- tracked through an inter- 
national dafiihiise. and the tag cannot 
be removed without damaging the 




Six of the eight rapes 

reported were 

acquaintance rapes in 

which the victim knew 

her assailant. 



Backpacks left outside of lockers 
are an easy target for thieves 

computer 

( (I'D alst) received 54 rcpt»rts ol 
stolen vehicles in 2<M)0 Cirand theft 
auto, which occurs almost on a weckl> 
basis, police siiid. is due in part lo the 
existence ot approximutcK 22. (KM) 
parking spaces throughout the cam- 
pus 
' We park 

more cars than 
Los \ngeks 
International 
\ I 1 p v> r t , " 
( ireenstcin siiid 
Though this 
gives criminals a 
large selection ot 
automobiles to 
choose lr(»m. 
Sadeh said using 
common sense 
can greativ decrease automobile theft 
fie Siiid students should check that 
thev ve locked car d(K>rs. and that 
Items ol value arc not in plain view 

Besides thefts. liCLA has its share 
ol violent crimes (X the 29 violent 
crimes including rape robherv and 
aggravated assault that occurred on 
and around campus m 2(MH). six oi the 
eight rapes reported were acquain- 
tance rapes, in which the victim knew 
her as.sailant 

lina Oakland, director ot the 
(enter lor Women and Men. said 
women arc often concerned with pre- 
venting stranger attacks, though HO 



CAIdPUS CRWiE 

Univmity poke ncemd thf following ffports of crane in 2000 WKe say many of tfwe criuiB an 
ewfCH* caution. ^ ' 



1.5(X) 



PraptftyCiMM 



1^ 



Crime Prevention Tips 








• Always keep an eye on your • MoniloralcohoiintaiK, newer 
property and never leave anything leave drink unattended 
aiattended 

• Male sure aH car doors aiekidKd 

• Walk with fnends and stay in and windows are rolled up 
wM-lit areas at night 

■ Keep valuaMn out of plain siglit 

• Call for a CSO escort: dul 4-WAlK 

fern any campus phone or 794^ • Use the evening van service, 
WU.K from a normal phone any which runs horn 6 pjn until 
' from dusk until 1 a.m midnight 




Most commonly stolen items 



■Backpacks 



' QeNutar phones 




> Laptop contuters 



' Parking permits 



iOUDC ummUfsXjMonMrMcrDiyaMnx 






percent ol rapes on college campuses 
nationwide are committed b\ indrvidu- 
ais lhe> know 

Students need to think beyond t|)e 
traditional stranger rape, because sla- 
tisticalK. acquaintance rape is mure 
likeK.' she said 

Because correlations exist between 
alcohol use and sexual violence. 
Oakland said, students must monitor 
their consumption and not leave their 
drinks unattended 

Assailants place drugs like rohypnt>l 
or ganima hydroxybutyrale ^ com- 
monly known as GHB - in potential 
victims' drinks, which leaves them 
unable to resist sexual advances 
Oakland said men must also he cau- 
tioas because perpetrators have been 



known to drug the men accompanying 
their victims 

To prevent a.ssaulls in areas .such as 
the "rape trail" a p«Hirly-lit dirt path 
thai extends from behind Su.\i>n Suites 
to the Westwtxxl apartments Sacteh 
said students should take notice of 
their surroundings and walk with a 
friend at night 

"Walk in welMif areas, and don't 
take shortcuts in areas that are hidden 
and dark." he said 

Community service ofTiccTs offer 
free escort services from campus lo a 
student's residence hall or ofT-campus 
apartment from dusk until I am each 
night In addition, an evening van ser- 
vice running week nights from 6 p.m. 
until midnight provides transpoitation 
1 



: 5?Taf7aR5BafiSS 

io' various locations on campus and 
surrounding areas 

Cireen*iiein urged students who 
bdievc something suspicious is (Kcur- 
ring or who feel unsafe ti) call ^)lice 

"Even if It turns out to he roihing. 
It's OK Th^l wa> we can respond and 
check It out." she said 

Sadeh said students who think they 
are a victim oi a cnme should report it 
immedwldy 

-Notify UCPD right away and uti- 
lize the res<Hirces of the police depart- 
ment.' Sadeh said "ifi]isfastenoi|gh. 
we can catch a lot orcmnnMk." 

To report a crime, contact UCPD at (310) 
■25-1491 To request a CSO escort a» 
(310) 794-\illlM.K. 



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VK'TON CHf N/Dwty Btu<n 




College can give rise 
to poor eating habits 



DISORDERS: Pressures of 
new lifestyle awaN from 
home alTeel food intake 



rti 



Many UCLA students rely on pills and coffee to help them stay awake while studying, despite warn- 
ings by health experts that over-consunnption of caffeine may cause pptential f>ealth problems. 

Caffeine use may pose health risks 



CULTURE: (.offee drinkers 
should consider possibly 
dangerous consequences 



[^ Bruin Staff 

■ CafTeine may be the drug of clioicc 
for many kxiking to stay up and cram 
for an exam, but over<(>nsumptiaa 
ccHild Icud to advene health efl'ects. 

And with rising popularity of' a caf- 
feine culture, vui the three cotTcc 
houses on campu.s and nationwide 
chain.s like Starbucks. over<onsump- 
tion IS prominent among colkge stu- 
dents 

', **lf I'm staying up throughout the 
night. I'll have coffee but sometimes 
when I pull alkiighters. I resort to caf- 
feine pills." said Christina Beede. a 
second-year political science student 

C (insidered safe from a medical 
standpoint. cafTeine consumption not 
only heightens the corwentration of it 
in one s system, but it also dspiaices 
adenosine, a cheimatl which would 
nonnally slow down brain activity. 
Hut resuhs in reduced fatigue 

iui Eleanor Axe. an aoaocinte 
p hya iC Mn at ike Arthur Aalit SHiim 

nCVMI aRS ^WWRCWm \^Cfliei . hhv w^ 

feme, whick • a aamilant. may cauK 



stomach pain Continued overuse can 
lead to inflammation of the stomach 
lining and cause rapid or irregular 
heartbeats 

CjifTeine is also a diuretic, prompt- 
ing one to unnate more often than 
usual TTkkc who consume caffeine 
on a daily basLs must compensate by 
drinking more than tfic recommend- 
ed eight cups ol water per day 



Students cannot 

rely on products like 

No-Doz and Vivarin 

as substitutes 

for sleep. 



"Peopkr dont drink cmnigh water 
to begin with, said Sheri Albert, a 
registered dietitian for tfie Ashe 
C!cnter "Any student wtw consumes 
caffeine must dnnk extra water " 

According lo the (enter Tor 
Science in the Public Interest. 
Amencans achieve three-quarters of 
their cafTeine mtake through coffee 

■aid many reach the dady 
t aT 200 to .300 miUigntnis of 



cafTeine without realizing it. and that 
effects vary depending on the individ- 
ual 

"F-vcryones tolerance is difTer- 
ent, ■ she said. "Some people can 
drink a lot of cofTtfe and suffer harm- 
ful effects, and others wouldn't be 
fa/ed by It " 

An 8-ounce cup of mstant ^.coffee' 
contains UN) mg of caffeine Drinking 
up lo three cups, depending on indi- 
vidual ti>lerancc. is still L-(>nsidered 
safe 

But the mcdium-si/ed coffee drink 
at Starbucks packs s5<l mg ol caffeine 
into a MHgk- serving 

Because commercial coffee drinks 
tend to have higher amounts of caf- 
feine, those who drink more than one 
per diiy tend to experience increased 
effects 

In addition to coffee. man> stih 
denis say they use caffane pills such 
as N(v[)»>/ and Vivarin, concentrated 
capuiles containing the recommend- 
ed daily allowance of caffeine in a sin- 
gle dose 

Beede said if students ctioose to use 
caffeine pills, they shouU take small 
dotes to decrease side effects, which 
inchidc tension headaches, hyperac- 
tivity and irritability She also said stu- 
dents cannot rely on products like 



By Ha i l aii i Ha 

Daily Brum Reporter 



Manx studcnt> drciid gaimnt; the 
"Freshman 15 " where sludeniv^.iin 
1:^ pounds their tirsi year irt collejic 
hut that myth still resonates through- 
KUl the ctmfincN ol residence halls 
Bui a preoccupation with food, 
weight and btxlv image mav be more 
serious than most MudentN think 

About 10 percent ol colTege stu- 
dents nationwide suffer from severe 
eating disorders such as anorexia ner- 
vosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating 
disorder More students, however, 
fall into a category called disordered 
eating 

* According to Julie Pearce. a clini- 
cal psychologist al Student 
Psychological Services, peopkr with 
disordered eating aren't severeK 
underweight but spend their time pre- 
iKCupied with IchxJ and dieting 

"They ma\ not have the luH-blovrn 
eating disorder, but this behavior sig- 
niricantly Interferes with their life.' 
she said 

Though the onset ol an eating div 
order or disordered caiing ma\ stem 
from early childhtMKi or puf»ert\. the 
stress of a new environment such at 



college may trigger feelings o( f>ody 
dissatisfaction 

"A lot of the students are leaving 
their families for the first time." 
I*earce said "Thev re on their own 
and don t rcalK know how lo func- 
tion The empfusis on appc.it. hki 
academic and dating competition 
stres>es them out "' 

Depression, bw sell-esteem, lami- 
Iv issues or economic problems mav 
lead lo the disorders, as individuaM 
try lo regain control by changing their 
eating beha\u>rs 

Signs of unhealthv preiKCupation 
with dieting, bodv image or weight 
gain ma> start as earls as elementary 
school Bv age nine. 50 percent of 
girls in the I 'nited Stales have dieted, 
with numbers reaching M9 percent by 
the time thev re 17 said Patricia 
Santucci. a clinical assistant professor 
at Loyola Medical Center, in a study 
titled. "Facts About Eating 
Distirders " 

Sialistics show that 15 percent of 
w(»men suffer lr»>m disordered eat- 
ing, but more men are also becoming 
concerned with thei^inxly image 

A recent study from the American 
Journal of Psychiatry estimates that 2 
percent of" men and 5 percent of 
women have an eating disorder 

According to Pearce. images in the 
media f<H;us on unrealistic body 
types, which affect men as weH. 

See iMIlK, paqe 18 



WARMING SIGNS OF RESTRICTIVE DtETING 

Studies show certain attitudes toward food result m emotional and social effects that may 
contnbute to disordered eating or eating disorders. 



Effects on attitudes and behavior 
toward food 

• Food preoccupation 

■ Collection of recipes, cooUnmIM^ 
menus 

• Unusual eating habiti ,^ 

■ Increased consumpliMi of 
dietiadas 

• Didtoiotnous thinliM||; 
"good food, bad food^ikm< 
mcie«es ritk of binge ^|^ on 

• linge eating 




9 



Emotional and social effects 

• Depression 

• Anxiety 

• Intability and anger 
tttttH lever -changing mood) 

* v^sydMK episodes 
PersoiHIy ckiafes 
Social I 



concentratNNi 



woo oawoa^ti Mill 



VIomldN him- 2;') HH)\ 



DaiK Brum Hrm/% 



Village eateries cater to 

WESTWCXM>: Sludcnls ran |)a\ [MMinies 
lor ii ((Milvic or o\pr $25 lor a fiill meal 



• Iili 



iilili 



By KeNy Rayfcurn and Josh WoN 

Ddily Brum Senior Stafi 

V^^,•^lW()lnJ \ illagc mi{:hi be the onlv plitcc with u 
s.iiKlvMch stand nicknanunl huck litis " oi a nH)kic 
Nt.irc which ^ill ncIK cookies lor a quarter 

I < 1 A students oltcn strapped lor sprending 

nixiK-v and iinic, l.i.i\t main cheap and ciunenient 
i.mkI ..piiiiii> ciosc !«' tjinpus includinj; buck htl\.' 
't!ki.ilK n.iinci! Roll Inn S.indwich. loninn s and 
|)\Kt. Kicsc Kill ilic mII.iuc aKn IcMliires more expen- 
ds,- >iido\Mi ii'slauianls toi ihosc od-asioiis when 
-'iivlciii w.sli '.-• spUii^- iMi ,1 meat 

uo..,: si-\i>.i.- Liic h>Hiis and cheap ..ookics make 

[ )uk). i.'c, licit Mi 'C(> Br>'Mon.\\c . an atlractKui tor 

-•iulci)!> \iul with otluM coinnuinitv rneinbers head- 

'"']:' :n!i. V^c^;uooll 111] lis cookies as v^cll. ihc store is 

'lljii hiis\ Linlil II closes a! inidniiihl 

Didd-. Kicsc named allei the owner's urandmothcr. 
• Mc!- iiian\ dillcrcni covvkics and ice cream 1la\i>rs. 
r'ii' ii'i cxpciicnced students, decidmu on an order 
(let omcs routine 

IVople in^arirfbK develop personal !a\orile> 
I leconmieml synimetr\ ehiKolalc chip icc cream 
\uih Jh>>.<>late chip cookies It ma> seem borinj:. but i 
Ifkc chocolate" said Sicole (. hretien. a third->ea,r 
i!iu ' .>hii)li)t.'\ student 

Sn.oiid-\eai ph\sics suident Darin See has a diller- 
e:r ^'utl.'ok 

I itoii I iio ii«i clioc.'late chips because- lhe> melt all 
'.e- i!!\ liiiiicriips V1\ recominendation Is nuts or lust 
. i ' 'kie he s.Uu 

I en vMili tills i.iiiue oi prelerences students seem 
■ 1' auree thai the besi pari about l)idd> Ric>e is Us 
PI ve 

I' > clie.ip s.iui \ee 

\Ur Duidv Riese,i>ii ; the onU cheap lood place in 
VV.-.'slwood 

I; ii - .1 Jieap breaklasi that students are attei 
Miadlines on kinr.)ss \\enue oilers ' Joe s pre»erip- 
li.'M hieaklasi twc-eiit's bacon p(>taloes and toast 
lo' S > T" 

Suidenis <.an also iiiab .Pchicken oi heel 12-inch bur- 
iiK'a! loinnn sloiS' bu\ cheese pi//a h\ the slice lor 
V I ti^ al I a MonKa s New ^ork Pi//a. or lor S2 2\ get 
ai^ s-HKh sandwich at Roll-Inn the sU»re which was 
Mrs' nickname'd buck-tilt\ when sandwK;b^-^-TMT^t 
SI so ^V 

Roll inn remains a popttfar destination lor iiungrN 
siudenis cNCn allei cit\ oHicials temporariK shut it 




Customers head toward DiddyRiese in Westwood, 
knowi^for its cookies and ice cream sandwiches. 

down in hcbruar\ because of a cockroach mlestalion 

-Sccond->car bioU»};> student Vieioria Tai said she 
likes lo go lo Roll-Inn lor a quick bite 

It s rcalK convenicni." she said "Nou can walk 
there. Its close ^ou can go there when >ou onl> have 
an hour between classes "" 

lai said she also likes restaurants like Ws Pizza and 
drill or ( ahiornia l'i//a Kitchen when she has time to 
sit di>wn with Iriends 

NVestwood Is also home to some upscale, nwrc 
expensive restaurants tor special occasions 

Furochi'w located i>n UWV Wesiwood BKd . 
opened in l*>***^ The dome-shaped building that houses 
the restaurant was constructed m l'*2'i> and is no* a his- 
toric landmark 

Since Its opening;, hurochow. which leatures a glass 
dining room floor, has served manv movie stars, 
including Drew Barrymore. Tom Hanks and Dcn/el 
NNashinglon 




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FREEWAYS 

f-rorr page 3 



2(>> atul '(K pariicularls in 1, A . 
where the eiiv n dccenlrah/ed nalure 
made aulDinobilt transportalion 
more eonvcnicnt than walking v»r tak- 
iiii; the iranMt 

'\nd >t> a car culture hegaii to 
emerge even bclore consiructuin o\ 
the Pa>adeii<i f reewav >laried 

\ \eii toda\, Xngelenos want ti' 
drive ears because the eit> in >i' 
sprawlin^L. said I ( Berkelev 
IVolesvii ol lranNpf>rtalu<i! Studies 
Martin N^aehs 

It s not lusi 
.1 matenai o: "~~"^^^~^^^" 
enioiiiin.il deei- 
^ii'ii ' he s.iii! 
I' - leallv* eon- 
venieii; to own 
.1 vai vvher de>- 
iiiiatii'ii^ art so 
>nre.ii.t,oii' It - 
,; MllMtl.ti de^i- 
■II'. 'I: 

Hir :r the 

:'K mk ,.,iki 

4o. 'lie devci 

'jMiieit' >>! .1 ^.1! 

Lui'ii'. iik-aii' 
:ii. Jii.l ■ ■: ieO V,:' 

Main as>tmie I lenerai Moior^ and 

''hc' ^pe^la! iniero' ;^:roups eon- 
vni:eJ with ei!\ ollieiaiv in !44(i to 
.:;,: M. 'ei! v.n iin.'- nn' evidence is 

' v."K Hi- . .-. a 



ncci the extended Pasadena Freewas 
Mithihe 101 HollywiKxl freeway 

Vli>dcrn-da> popular literature, 
such as Waiter VIoicly s noir Los 
AngeleN mysierv, "Devil m a Blue 
Dress." which lakes place in l*)4K, 
describes hi»w more people owned 
cars alter the war 

The ptKirest man. has a car in Los 
\figeles. he rnight not have a rcxit 
t>ver his head but he ha* u car." 
Moselv wr(»te 

In 1*^5.^ the lour-level grade sepa- 
ration wa.s complete The city retired 
the last red car eight years later 
Since then I \- has been deemed 
a freeway city 
The freeways 
^^^~^^^~~' Hiemselves played 
roles in numerous 
movie sets. 



"The poorest man has 
a car in Los Angeles; he '"^'"d'ng To 

Live and Die in 

might not have a roof 

over his head but he 

has a car." 

Walter Mosely 

Autho; 



\K 



,i':irtL 



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•' .1. ri.i'^eiii^e' - lun: 
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.■ ■'.■>i. ■ .•'■et'cJ. 'i.uf : 

- ' " ''h woritl ., 1': ,■ 
i^;. ^>-i\:: .i! I. '! iivM' 



LA Falling 

Down and 

Speed ' 
The region, 
savs French s«ki- 
ologisi Jean , 

Baudnllard. is 
uiitriendlv to 

pedestn.nis 

If you get out 
oi \oiii tar in this centrifugal metrop- 
olis vou immediatelv become a delin- 
quent <is soon as vou start walking. 
vou are a threat to public (»rder. like a 
doi; wandering in the road." he wrote 
111 .: I'»^^ book called "America " 

I lu' leLiioii > huge numbei oi car> 
'i,;v. i.auseJ aK-i^u.ilil\ prv'bliKiis .i> 
ve' 

iii.'UL't'. .iii-pollution eonditioiiv 
li.' J inipro\eu iivihe last ^0 veatv 
>n 'L nIiI e\.i.e''baie- or iead^ i<o 
lie. ill,: i•.'lutlnoll^ N.ik! I ( '! Aphvsi- 
'ioi.'\ I'loiessi)' c luN RoberVs 

I !ie'. I- sonu' e\ idence that exei- 
. ^. ,1 .1 smoggv environinen' mav 
.,ri>. ■. n, !>. he more susceptible (o 




Even in 1 936, when this photo of Westwood and Wilshire Boulevards was taken, cars filled the streets. 



exercise-induced asthma, or may irri- 
tate someone wh<> already has that 
condition because there are nuire par- 
ticulates in the air '' he said 

Roberts added thai carbon monox- 
ide, present in cigarette smoke, aisc 
evisls in car e.nhausl He said people a; 
I CI \ are less exposed to smog than 
those living tarthcr from the ocean 

Because of iratlic and smog prob- 
lems, manv groups attempt ti> lessen 
the number o! ears traveling in L A 

Besides establishing more bu> 
routes and efforts lo move people v i.i 



suh«ay - which have not been nearly 
as successful a> attempts m the San 
Francisco B.iv area New Nork (itv 
and Bo>!ton some programs prov ide 
incentives tor people \o carpot>l 



For 



years, an organi/aiion 



called Southern C alifornia Rideshine 
boasts of helping commuters find 
alternatives \o drivini:-aK>ne lira car. 
including helping businesses and indi- 
viduals set up car and vanp<K>! 
gritups 

And while main complain about 
the lack o! public transportation in 



<he greater L.A area. I'C'LA. at least. 
Is adequately serviced by buses, said 
urban planning Professor Brian 
laylor 

According lo Taylor. l.lfHl buses ;i 
day arrive at UCLA 

bvcn Prover. who calls herself an 
"internal optimist.*' ha» h«)pe lor the 
Jutureol LA transportation 

"If we miike a real commiimeni. 
an^1hlng is possiWe." she s<iid "This 
citv .has bri>ught together some of the 
miwt inn(>vatne people ever. There » 
no reason wh) *e can't doUt" \ 



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I(» Monday. Junr 25. 2(H) I 



Diiiiv Brum Nrws 



PART-TIME 

From page 3 

lu^k^'il .IU.I\ |)ll lik M.\.>IKi tliiol 

.' K>.-Kklu'll liK Hiiin.li; KcM'iiKCN 
( ,iik; p.'^i- \sl ( I \ |ioMiii>iiMUii- 
, .!. .In Jti.i; ,ii)J pi.«Ui.k'> iIk' paper- 

■ ■, "i. IK-^v-^--.ll ■ ' ' ..ippi'> l<>I >l H'^> 

I'.. 'Hkv .ii!- a-N .1 ii.iiMMi hL'lwccn 
ii ^;^ldl.■n: .mil o.ti.h i-mpl«>\c! if 
.ULMmliiiv- ihc pi.itC^> 

\U>. .i\..il,ihL thioii;jh \Sl ( I. \ 
.It . i.ih^ ,ii I Ik- I (I \ Sliuc. .11 
\, k.'ili.iii I lUi'ii :ii lliw-tLh.tluilM.- 

II.jIu-! p.i'- MU' l"^>- 'luliuli.- I.if^ 
.i--;nI.iiu- 'ii'i uMiipiiici uork^hopN 

l!ivi >LipL'! . ;>.'I p^'^llll'n^ li'l \\\U IlllUC 

1' iu>' .1 i-lick ol iIk- nu>u>c .ivK.iv 

f hv h^.■^: tliiii'j would bt ti' u^c 
.. ■ \\i.-h ^!!> ^.ikI I .itL'c; C cnici 
\->.., . lU'Diuci.M \lbcn \iiKin 

N'..d(.-iiN m^i^l t\pc 111 lliCR Mici.i! 
^>\..'||\ iKinhci I.' .k-lCnn u>h ii>tinj;-< 
.mJ iiicrn>hip- lo dalc^ more ihait 
2i>:' po^lIloIl•^ are ,i\aiLthle ihroujih 
'!k ..■mei- 

Itulepcniiem slore^.ln Aekcrman. 
Ilk. I'ul>e ihc e.in\puN eop> house. 
ollei othei i>piionv \or student 
ciiiploMiieni 

I'liUe MarLiuer Vlike Weber suid 
employers at the >hop and student 
workers have a muluallv benclieial 
rel.itionship 

Itii.' bcnetits to us employing stu- 
dents IS the> know the campus and 
ihe\ re available i^n ■(shorl notice." 
SNebei said The benefit to students 
Is the nevibilitv, thev can v^ork 
berueen ci.isses ' 

\SI (I A en^oyees are given a 
voiisisieni s..hedule loi the quarter 
ivh cl; works .iround their academic 
sJii.\lfl+r .111 .idv.intage Nuen said is 
.iiK.Munioii oil I ( [ \ grounds 
Diriiii; !m.iis students mav rcsched- 
iili- !' iiei.ess.li \ 

Hill \Sl ( 1 \ Is onlv one place-to 



look lt)r campus empiovitienl 

\ or some, the quest tbcgihs with a " 
I ree ,\pplicalu»n lor Kedcral Stuticnl 
\id Departments at I (1 A sponsor 
work-siudv progr.inis to aid eligible 
siiajents 

I'lovided .ill deadlines are met. up 
to >2.(KHi mav be awarded V1t>ne\ 
reeci^ed trom work-sludv d»H.'s ni»i 
count toward determinini; /inancial 
need lor ihc lollowmg si>hool vear. as 
would an inc4»me lorm a non-work- 
siudv |ob 

l'ositu>ns that oiler highei starting 
N.ilaiv latcs include the J mergciicv 
V1edic.ll Services .Hid ( ommunitv 
ScjMce Ollicei program, starting at 
■sH V and SK 42 an hour respectivciv 

I mergencv Medical -I echiiicians 
.lie students trntncd to respond to 
emergencv calK received bv universi- 
IV police and are the first to respond 
to a scene trainees spend the first 
weeks undergoing .i series ol hypt>- 
iheiical situations and recnaetnient 
with other bM Is 

While manv students enter vMth 
intents to gain experience in the med- 
ical field, skills gained from interact- 
ing with paiients carry over bcyiMid 
the workplace, said kirk Burgunn 
an FMT who graduated with *a 
degree in physiological science last 
spring 

Its a great experience." said 
Burgamy. who joined the program in. 
his third year "If I had known about 
It scH)ner I would have applied sotm- 
er ■ 

Though ambulances racing down 
the streets of WestwiMxl arc a com- 
m«>n sight, many students don't real- 
ize such a position is open to under- 
graduate students, he said 

Neighboring the TMIs jn the 
I (PI) statu)n are ( ommunily 
Service OtTicers trained as the "eves 
and ears of the ptilice CS(K arc 
trained bv senior officers in a variety 
ol sessions which span from campus / 
escorts -to residence hall patrols The 




Brie Chin works as a lab consultant at the CLICC, the College Library rnstructional Computing Commons 

program emphasi/es. a non-inlerven- 
tion policy, though students attend a 
radio class and ajre equipped and 
trained to use pepper spray -^ 

Kor those still caught in the muck 
of an overabundance of job choices, 
the C arcer C enter ca;i help narrow 
down decisions. 

"It's never too early to use the 
Career Cenier," Aubin said "Yimi 
don't have to know what you want to 
do before you come tc» us " 

Kmployeesat th*' center say they 
often find that students seem indeci- 
sive ab(»ut a )ob because they under- 
value their previous work experience 

"One of the things I try Jo get them 
to realize is that all work experience 
has value." Aubin said It s how*o 
translate that to a resume, that's how 
we can be helpful" 




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or can 310.125.^71- On-campus parking is available 
M iifww.transportation.ttcla.edu or po.825.9871. 

For complete UCLA Summer Sessions information and . 
Schedule of Classes, visit www.summer.uda.cdtt. 
Enroll via URSA OnLine at www.ursa.ucla.edtt. 

Office/HouTS: 

1147 Murphy Hall. Mcmday-Friday. 9 am-s pm 

Tel: 310.794 8333 f*x: 3'0 7*4 S«*o 

iic/n summtr sessions 2001 





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Dail>' Bruin 



Monday, June 25. 2(N) I II 



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The day you were bom 

Your first day of school 

Geuing y our d river's license , _ 

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Registering to vote 

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12 Monday. June 25. 2001 

PROFESSOR 

From page 1 

take a wide varict\ otclasses until you 
find stimething thai reallv turns you 
on. Mtmething thai really intercsld ygii 
intellectually I think that » what you 
should major in I don t even think 
thai a student should worr\ about 
tl\eir airccrs or what the> re going to 
do with their live> The \ast majorit\ 
ot students, what they do in their live>. 
m lerms of w(»rk. is not going to be 
dircctlv related to what the> studied in 
>chool .An awlul lot ol people out 
there who are hiring don t realK care 
what vou studied The\ just want to 



TRANSPORTATION 

From page 3 

ing the 2(K)0-0I school year Allcr 
recording more than 7(K),0(K) swipes, 
oil icials decided to extend the service 
im amitber year, though they suv 
pended the program lor the summer 

I 'CL A transportation ofTicials say 
the\ plan to market the BruinGo' 
program more vigorousK this sum- 
mer than last, and they hope lor a 
greater ridership next year 

hor those who wish to venture 



Daily Bruin 



know that you're inlelligeni enough 
to have made it through school and 
that you ve acquired certain skills 
such as intellectual and communica- 
tion skills 

H'hai do vtni suv li> thosf sludenh 
coming in thinking thai the grade i.\ 
innsi iniporuini ' 

We di) live in a competitive world 
and It s not thai grades are unimpor- 
tant, but the important thing is what 
you take awav from la class) how ii 
atlects your un^erstandmg. what kind 
ol a person it makes you in the long 
Cun Remember, don'i lose sight ol 
what It s all about, which is learning 



beyond the route limitations of the 
Big Blue Bus. the Los Angeles 
County Metropolitan Transportation 
Authority, also known as MTA or the 
Metro. IS an economical option 

The MTA, covering 1.400 square 
miles in LA C ounty. provides col- 
lege students a S30 discounted 
monthly pass The pass includes 
unlimited use ol'^he more than 2(X) 
bus lines MTA operates, containing 
routes that extend east to the San 
Bernardino C ount\ Line, south to 
Long Beach Harbor and north to 
Lancaster and Palmdale 



learning how to think and how to 
become a better peri»on. learning 
about the world Hopefully you can 
struggle for thoae grades and get all 
those good things that you re suppose 
to be getting in the process 

In v*nir expenemr. what do vou 
find In hi- l^e general pt>iiaes regard- 
ing make-up wtirk. altendanee undUile 

papers' 

They should, as much as poMibte. 
do evei'ything on time It's only going 
to hurt you il you turn things in late 
You'll be penalized That, to a large 
extent, is about being responsible 
Afterwards, there will be deadlines 



In addition, pass holders have 
unlimited access to the metro rail sys- 
tem, which currently contains two 
lines and. according to MTA 
spokesman Gary Wosk. plans to 
expand to 22 in the near future 

Riders can use the trip planner on 
the MTA Web site to niid proper 
transfers and connections dunng a 
trip 

Though riding on city buses and 
subways can be an intimidating expe- 
rience. Wosk said law enforcement is 
present at every station 

"You'll have a sale trip on our 



that they'll have to meet, and they 
should learn to meet them now In 
terms ol attendance. I would hope 
students would get enough out of the 
classes that they would want to show 
up every time I would never take 
attendance in class it students don'i 
want to go to class. 1 would prefer.that 
they don't come I don't want to teach 
people who don't want to be there, 
who don't want to learn If their heads 
and values are in the right place, then 
they'll want to be them 

Any other witrds of wusditm far 
ineaming stuik-nls' 



feasor ts that i like teaching. an(j I 
truly think that it can change people's 
lives My undergraduate education 
really changed my life It made me 
into a new. better person, just to see 
the world in a whole new way. I was 
such a different person from when I 
entered at age 18 and when I left at 
afc 22 Potentially, it's just a wonder- 
ful experience for these students 
Here they arc at UCLA, one of the 
best universities in the world Some ot 
the greatest minds in the world are 
right here It's such a wonderful poasi- 
bility with such potenlud to change 
peopk's lives. They should keep that 
in mind and make the best of 



One ol the reasons that -I am a pro- j«ars. 



buses." Wosk said "There are sur- 
veillance cameras on every bus and 
station, and the stations are in an 
open-air environment where commit- 
ting a crime can be difTiciiit." 

While the BruinGo' program and 
MTA are the two most accessible 
puMic transportation systems around 
campus, other options include the 
Culver City bus line and C ommuter 
Express, which covers Santa Qanta 
and the San Fernando Valley 

Kor students who choose to drive 
to UCLA. Parking Services issues 
parking permits on a need-based 



point system that considers class 
standing, employment, academic 
obligations and commuter distance 

But even with plans to build a 
parking structure-that would provi^ 
an additional 1.500 ipaoet uader- 
neath the intramural filll,lMMy firit- 
year students wnal he mmmii a j 
mit 

But UCLA has recognized the 
need for puMic transportation, and 
students without cars wishing to ven- 
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DORMl 



dornuk." he wid. 

After spending two years ni the 
dorms, students often grow weary of 
CSO roiuKk. conimuiud living and 
dorm food, seeking instead the com- 
fort and independence oi apartment 

hfe. '-/n^rr..' 

"After two years, (he novdJy of 

dorm life definitely wore ofl for me." 
said Kristen Sas^moto. a third-year 
art student 'I'm dermiteiv ready to 
move into my new apartment next 
year, and it'll he nice to eal at 
whichever time I want to again. 
instead of keepiQg up volli thpdamif 



AOUJEMIC 

From page 1 



open on a walk-in or appointment 
hasis These larger counseling 
offices help students plot their acad- 
emic course at UCLA, offer work- 
shops at Covel Commons and spon- 
sor athletic and pre-professional 
counseling for more specuihzed 
needs. 

( Qvel workshops - from exam 
preparation to basic stuc^ 
give students the 
skills to avoid ^^_ 
academic ruts 
before they 

occur The tips 
from Covel are 
the same as those 
reiterated 
throughout acad- 
emia: Read Go 
to class Don't 
procrastinate «^______^_ 

Second-year 
undeclared stu- 
dent Sara Yu experienced the jug- 
gling act as a freshman while bal- 
ancing classes with crew practice 
every morning Books often stayed 
closed and tests snuck up on her 

"I cant do this next year," she 
said 

The secret to beating the system 
IS to work with other students with- 
in It. Munguia said 

Many departments have under- 
graduate asaocwtions designed to 
help students form an early social 
circle consisting of similar career- 
oriented members Those transi- 
tioning can learn from the older stu- 
dents. 

"In general, students get more 
out of UCLA if they hook up with 
other students, study together," 
Munguia said. "They share tips and 
form study groups" 

Additionally, students with 
declared majors may utilize depart- 
mental counseling, which offers 
one-on-onc guidance to help new- 



CAFFEINE 

Frotn pages 

these as substitutes for sleep 

"Af^er a week, you'll cra.sh and sleep 
for a day and a 

half." Beede said ^^"^^^"' 
"You have a 
lower academic 
performance as 
well- 
According to 
Axe, over-sttmula- 
tion can cause 
impaired think- _^^^^^^^^ 
mg 

Other effects 
of caflfeme on the body include slight 
caknim loss in the bones, which is 
minor if either milk is added to coffee 
or if the km is compensated through 
vitamin supplements The recom- 
mended daily aHowmoe for oriown ■ 
1.000 mf per dqr. 

oombmiog oMiae niii itfHr margjr 

Its or fat 



hall houn." - - 

■ut sometimes dorm life provides 
opportunities for involvement in 
extracurricular activities that may 
otherwiK go imnotioed. 

Grace Byeon. a fomer Hedrick 
and Sproul Hall resident, learned 
about one such opportimity in an 
unconventional place. 

"I walked into the bathroom at 
Hednck during my first year, aaid 
noticed flyers for a fe 
Igroup called Random 
Byeon. a third-year Spanish and eth- 
nomusicology student 

"I audiuoncd and made a lot of 
friends in the prooeas, but I don't 
think I would have become involved 
d 14idB't live in the dcKms." 



comers assimilate into UCLA 
Course selection, time management 
and dealing with stress are common 
concerns for students making a 
transition. 

The Academic Advancement 
Program is another group designed 
to promote academic success in a 
more focused audience. 

AAP targets underrcpresented 
minorities and first-generation col- 
lege $udents to promote equity and 
opportunity on campus Its pro- 
peer counseling and 
a transfer pro- 



"Students get more 

out of UCLA if they ^ 

study together." 



Student affairs c^icer 



gram under 
the guidance 
of current stu- 
4eBtt and 
staff advisors 
"We pro- 
vide all ser- 
vices. It's very 
student-cen- 
tered •« 
...____^___ there's a lot of 
feedback as to 
' 'What the stu- 
dents' i^edfe are." said EIroy Pinki. 
a science counselor for AAP 

"It's so varied Students bring so 
many things to the table - piany are 
working quite a bit or have child- 
care respon8i\>ilities.'' He continued. 
AAP workshops and round table 
discussions may help solve prob- 
lems resuhmg from the hustle of the 
quarter system 

Despite the abundance of acade- 
mic resources, feme choose to 
develop their own strategies 

Buries took the solo route and 
said he did fine without counseling 
or workshops outside transfer ori- 
entation 

"I used a scheduling book and 
(spent) lots of time in the library." 
he said. 

"I would suggest transfers live oa 
or close to campus if pouible." he 
said. ~I commuted my first quarter 
and It really cut into my studj time 
I had to sleep in my car a few 
nights" » 



burner products Albert said nuny of 
these products are dnguned as herbal 
blends but possess large concentra- 
tions of caffeine. ^ 

Many of these products contain 
ephedra, commonly known as Ma 
Huang, an 



"^veryon^ tolerarKe 
Is different." 



Ashe Center dietitian 



herb used for 
weight loss that 
when abuaed can 
lead to side effects 
similar to thoae 
induced by 

amphetamines, 
including elevat- 
^___^____^^_____ ed blood pre^ 
sure, mwide dis- 
turbances, insomnia, dry mouth, heart 
palpitations. nervoHMMM and even 
death due to iMVt Mure 

Caffeme tkmt can be disastrous, 
but experts tajf cweM consumption 
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HONORS 

From page 1 

units pf honors course work Those 
eniering with 44 to K.l units must 
lake 4() units ol honors courses and 
those with K4 or more units oiMSt 
complete 36 honors units 

Transfers must complete 28 hon- 
ors units, though they ma> petition 
to have up to K units of previous 
honors coursework added to their 
quota 

Participatinjc in College Honors 
does not necessarily mean taking 
extra courses Many honors classes 
satisfy general education ot major 
requirements 

To remain in the program, sta- 
dents must enroll in at least 8 honors 
units per year As these units accu- 
mulate, the minimum required GPA 
slowly rises from .3.1 to .^..S by gradu- 
ation. 

A thesis route is also avaitatile 
through individual departments, 
which allows students to complete 
research in three consecutive quar- 
ters This alternative is ideal for stu- 
dents who wish to pursue 'depart- 
mental honors since the course load 
1> geared toward cimrscs tn a stu- 
dent's major. 

Departmental honors are not 
bestowed upon a student until 
junior or senior year Students may 
apply during this time by submitting 
a transcript, letters of recommenda- 
tion and a nomination form The 
student must hold at least a 3 5 GPA 
in both the major and overall 
coursework 

Upon admission into the pro- 
gram, the student can pursue a 
bachelor s and a master's degree 
simultaneously, which streamlines 
the graduate application process 
and provides the opportunity lor 
graduate-level research 

"The reason the Undergraduate 
Student Association came up with 
this idea was because that particular 
group was graduate schtK>l-bound. 
They wanted to have the best kind ot 
academic writing they could do." 
said Beth Cray, staff advisor in art 
history for undergraduates 

Bui after implementing the priv 



GROUPS 

From page 2 « 

most campus funding. 

On the other hand, an officially 
rcc(»gni/ed group requires a signa- 
ture from it department chair and 
advisor m addition to the three signa- 
tures of interested members These 
groups can apply for campus fund- 
ing, use campus facilities and afTiliale 
themselves with UCLA and its logo 

According to a 1999 study by the 
University of Western Australia, 
those who participate in student 
organizations gam leadership experi- 
ences that lead to success in future 
studies and employment 

"You make a lot of friends and you 
learn a lot of difTerenI skills tlwt you 
wouldn't have otherwise, like making 
proposals and managing the budget. " 
said Craig Newman. vice<hair of the 
African Student Union "This stuff is 
all-important if someone wants to go 
into business or study economics." 

Newman, a fourth-year American 
literature student, said he decided to 
jotn ASH because of its outreach 
efforts to the community 

One of the larger groups on cam- 
pus. ASU n a cuhural. educational 
and advocacy organization which 
joined others in rallying for the 
recent repeal of SP-1 aMi 2 - 
University of Califonwi pakcies that 
eliminated affirniativc aoliMi for six 



gram. Gray said, not many students 
have priKeeded to seek honors The 
intimidation shrouding such an 
extensive research project has been 
the largest deterrent, she said 

Less daunting are honors soci- 
eties, which mix social interaction 
with the academics 

Breaching into the national sec- 
tor o{ available hdiiors. Alpha 
Lambda Delta and PKi Eta Sigma 
claim 550.000 and 575.000 mem- 
bers, respectively. 

"Membership m«fi lienors soci- 
ety IS an opportunity for students to 
be involved with other students who 
have the same desire and goal to 
seek academic excellence." said 
dean of students Joan Nelson. 

"It does serve as a club and an 
organization students can be 
involved in and find friendships 
with students of like interests," tkte 
said 

All freshmen wrth at least a 3.S 
GPA after their first quarter are 
automatically invited to join, 
though any student with an overall 
CiPA ot 3.5 or above is eligible and 
may contact the dean of students 
olTice to apply. The GPA is required 
to enter the society, but does not 
need to be maintained, since the 
society trusts that its members will 
uphold their own academic stan- 
dards 

Though participation in events is 
optional, members are encouraged 
to run for ofTice and gel involved in 
the decision-making process 

"A lot of times, you have to be a 
junior or senior to be a leader, as far 
as the level of responsibility goes. " 
Nelson said "In these organiza- 
tions, you can start into leadership 
as a freshman or sophomore " 

F-or students looking for honors 
recognition later in their academic 
career, other societies offer more 
cumulative criteria. 

The Mortar Board is a national 
honors organization that recognizes 
seniors for outstanding academic 
and community service perfor- 
mance At graduation, members 
carry a spiralrbound day planner - 
the "mortar board" that signifies 
scholarship, leadership and service, 
the group's motlat .■ , 



DuiK Brum Snm 



Monddv Jum> 25. 2001 17 




Association of Chinese Americans, 
said the large size of AC A compli- 
cates matters jivhen members are try- 
ing to pass Items on the agenda 

"Although we were able to offer 
our own input on issues, we still have 
such diverse beliefs, even within the 
grtMip." said Tseng, a fourth-year eccv 
nomics student "At times, it was dif- 
ficult to mobilize everyone into one 
direction" 

While Tseng said the group's size 
made it difficult to get things accom- 
plished, attending sessions or events 
enablod her to know more members 
than she would otherwise 

Recent events hosted by ACA 
include plays, a Firecracker Run to 
commemorate the Chinese New Year 
and cuhural nights with ethnic food. 
Involvement in the groiip. Tseng 
said, has allowed her to explore her 
own roots and identify with people 
who share a similar background. 

Melanie Ho, a fourth^year policy 
and media studies student, said she 
joined Bruin^i)emocrats to meet 
other pciiple concerned with politics. 
During the 200(M)I school year, the 
group co-sponsored a city council 
forum for local candidates from 
Dtstrict Five, which includes areas of 
Lot Ai^ai. Mch « Vmi ^4lly». id 
Air, WeMwaiaBd Century City 

After timmmnag the group on 

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RESTAURANTS 

From page C 

But be prepared to dole uul some 
money. 

Euroch(Mr*s main courses ramge 
from the grilled portobellu. which 
costs SI5.95. to the grilled veal 
chop, at S24 95 Pasta dishes, piz- 
2as. soups and appeti/ers are avail- 
able at cheaper prices 

Another new arrival to 
Westwood. the Glendon Avenue 
Nupa Valley Grille, opened m 
January and strives to have its clien- 
tele experience wine country whiJe 
they dine. 

Spacious patios and fireplaces 
contribute to its ahfibiance 

In May. Los Angeles City 
Council candidate Tom Hayden 
held a %5Q0 per person fundraiser 
there. 

At the Grille, main courses cost 
(16.95 and up - much more than a 
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EATING gv 

From page S * 

"Not only arc men supposed to be 
thin, but they are supposed to be 
stjong. butT and lit." Pearce said 
"Men arc Icx'ling a lt>t more pressure, 
as wi>men have lelt lor a long time, to 
have the perlect body " 

While disordered eattng ts more 
prevalent on college campuses. full- 
Mown eating disorders like anorexia, 
bulimia or binge eating that atTect 
fewer students can lead to serious 
health problems 

According to the Diagnostic and 
Statistical Manual of Mental 
Disorders, anorexics have an intense 
fear of becommg "fat" but often 
weigh less than 85 percent of the nor- 
mal weight for their age and height. 

I'ntreated. anorexia may cause 
osteoporosis, abnormalities in the 
menstrual cycle, dehydration, abnor- 
mal heartbeat and possible death 

Bulimia IS characleri/ed by binge 
eatmg episodes, followed by purging 
Common eflects include weakness, 
dehydration, abnormal heart beat, 
headaches, muscle spasms and discol- 
oration and damage of teeth 

Binge eating is als<.> characterized 
by consumption of large amounts of 
food, but unlike bulimia it is not fol- 
lowed by excessive exercise, fasting 
or purging Binge eating may lead to 
obesity and medical problgms. such 
as high bUxid pressure, diabetes, 
stroke and high cholesterol 

Students who think they may be 
suffering from eating disorders or 
disordered eating can seek help from 
professionals who provide an individ- 
ualized plan of treatment 

"I encourage (students) not to deal 
with this all by themselves." Pearce 
said. 'Thc\ should know that they 
have a lot of optioins They don't have 
to keep living with that kind of pain " 

UCLA nutritionist Sheri Albert 
warns against drawing attention to 
negative behaviors attributed to 
severe disorders and encourages stu- 
dents t<» fiKus on problems with diet- 
ing and disordered eating 

"I would guess H lot of students 
have felt bad about their bodies, have 
dieted to loose weight, and have said. 
I feel so fat ' Thafs the kind of 
behavior that we are targeting m our 
cflorts," Albert said 

She encourages students to eat a 
balanced, high-fibcr diet in moderate 
portions and to exerciK. Exercising 
doesn't mean spendmg hours at the 
gym. but students may participate in 
activities they enjoy, such as dancing, 
.sports or bike riding 

°*Our goal IS to spread the word 
that fit Brums come m all shapes and 
•lies." Albert said 

"Our focus IS for students to eat 
well, be active and feel good about 
their bodies because that's the bot- 
tom line m achievmg a healthy hv> 



Dail\ Brum 



Monday, June 25. 2001 19 




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WKSTWOOD VILLA«E 

310.209.1055 

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V1on(ld\. Jum- 25. 2<M»1 



Make sure to pick up the Registration 
Issue in the fall, featuring viewpoints 
h\ students, staff, facult> and vanous 
memhers of our cominunit>'. 

wewpiNnt#imdii.uda.edij 




An epic e-mail chronicles 
one nerd^s gnarly day while 
a hi^h-maintenance student 
forgets to take her chill p\ 



In ihcprcNcni. UCLA is a p<>st-apt>t 
j|>p(ic niphlmarc wi>fld where tts 
dcni/cn> hghi lor vxistencc on .1 
daiK ba>iN Fhes lend oil the dangers ot 
pri»tc>M)rnidv and vnlcnt dorm UhkI 

flic toliowini; 
i> .1 Iklionai >ur- 
Mv.il i!uide t>l one 
Homo N.ipicn > 
Niruuiile to ad.tpi. 
or i>i hecomc KhkI 
toi someone high- 
er up on the MK.i.tl 
l.idder I proniiNe 
thai I am not 
neari\ a> nerd\ a> 
ihe char.iclet So. 
senousl> 

ITiis column is ""■^"^^"^""■^^ 
K-'st read out loud 
\v ith a lerrible lisp 

Thb e-mail is a missive to all the kick- 
ass dudes in "Magic The (iatherinp" 
chairiH>m and Id like to give a special 
shout out to (iothkiddOl who I just 
heard got his headgear taken otTtodav 
\N Ith that in mind. I would like to 

Ltef IS a fourth-year Er^lish student 
who drearps of electric sheep. Contact 
him at dlief">'ucla.edu 




update m\ progress 
on project: Bruin- 
assimilate I swear 
this place IS st» like 
the Borg I should 
call mysell LiKulis 
Hce hee hce hee 
-SNORT'"< 

Whv did I type in Ihe 
snort' 

Anyway. Magicdudes. this was 
my first experience with a I iC'LA 
lliursday. and let me tell you. it was 
something out ot H P Lovecraft (his 
early stufTbclore he totally sold out) 

In the morning. I left my cubicle. 
er. dorm rtnim. and t<H>k a trip down 
what they call Brum Walk. 
Apparently its sojnc wwl of display 
put (tn by the psychology department 
to sht>w(?5»se paranoid schizophren- 
ics There were hillbilly preacher 
guys telling me I wiHiid writhe in hell- 
firc. communists telling me I would 
writhe in hellfire (communism is st). 
like. NP anyway), and an Asian frater- 
nity telling me I would writhe in hellfire 

I told the frat guy I would only 
pledge* Lambda Lambda Lambda, but 

SeeUV,pa9e22 





UCLA IS like a science 
experiment in which 
you discover that oil 
and water just don't mix On 
one hand. UCLA is located 
in LA. a city «>f 
excess and 
wealth On the - 
other. IICLA is 
definitely 
known f«w its 
laid-back atti- 
tude toward life 
That said, life 
at.UCLAcanbe 
a little confusing 
I for those not 
used to the jeans and T-shirt 
lifestyle While one would 
expect DCLA to live up to its 
ritzy surroundings, m truth. 
UCLA IS about as ritzy as the 
ItKal 7-Eleven The following is 
a fictional account of what can 
happen when you come to 
UCLA refusing to take that 

Brookes is a third-year English stiK 
dent vtfho knows that Diet Coke is 
the dnnk of champions E-n>ail her 
at abrookes^ucla^edu. 



much needed "chill pill " 
8 a.m.: It's 8 in the morning 

and she's already up HerSIO 

kmart alarm clock is blaring 

away and the birds haven't even 

started 

singing yet' 

I 'd give nry 

diamond 

tennis 

bracelet to 

hear the 

sweet voice 

of Marie 

right nov« 

( Mane is 

my maid - 

my lovely. 

beautiful. ^^^^""~~~'~ 

ntvnced-for- 

an-ularm-clock Mane.) 

If that girl (and by "that girl" 

I mean my new roommate) 

doesn't shut that alarm off 

soon. I'M see her in court (My 

daddy is a litigator who gets 

$500 an hour jusi to argue with 

people kind of lit^e Cher's 

dad in "Clueless ") 




Shape history through involvement in Bruin d)nfmunity 



GOVERNMENT: Ad\(>ra(> 
groups. I SA(^ -depend on 
p«»i1icipati()n of students 

On behall (»t Ihe 
Undergraduate Students 
AsstKiation ( ouncil. I would 
like to welcome you to LiCLA' 

^ou are 
entering I (T A 
ai a very excit- 
ing and pivotal 
lime As the 
landscape of the 
state ot 
( alilornia 
becomes more 
culturally 
diverse I X I \ 
has become less 
retlective of the 

diverse popula- 

Hon II s intend- 
ed 1" serve .is ,1 (, alitorni.i public 
msiitiiiion 

Tills shill IS a contradiction to the 
List ttiiriv veils ol I ( I A history 

Lane is the 2001 2002 Undergraduate 
Students Association Council President 




Within the last three decades I 'CL A 
has revolutitmi/ed cducatKin by tak- 
ing active steps to actualize the con- 
cept ol diversity on campus 

The collective efforts ot I 'CL.A 
students, faculty, administration and 
community members have resulted in 
the creation o\ the ethnic studies c-en- 
ters. I (L A s divestment from 
apartheid South Africa and the devel- 
opment of the High Potential prtv 
gram, which created comprehensive 
admission policies admitting students 
based on their desire to continue their 
education and the contributions they 
would make to the campus and the 
greater community 

It was efforts such as these that 
earned UCLA its reputatK>n as one 
ot the most prestigious universities in 
the nation We. as students, must all 
play iHir role in ensuring that I ("LA 
stays true to its history of diversity 
through student activism and coUcc- 
live effort 

fhis year. I SAC as the leadership 
Kxly ol I (T. As student govern- 
ment, aims \o face this challenge head' 
on by prov idine opportunities lor stu- 
dents \o hec<ime more actively 
engaged in then educational experi- 
ence 



The primary role of I'SAC is lo 
advocate on behalf of students' 
needs All of the student government 
otTicers hrfve concrete plans to 
address issues including the cost of 
housing, the availability of parking, 
financial aid. campus safety, the lack 
of diversity m curriculum and admis- 
sion policy reform The intention is to 
provide a campus environment that 11 
IS supportive of students' develop- 
ment as individuals 

However, all of these efforts arc 
contingent upon your participation 
As students, you must take full own- 
ership of your educational experi- 
ence 

Traditionally, "students" are con- 
sidered individuals who simply con- 
sume information inside of a class- 
riHim This approach toeducation 
does a disservice to the work that you 
have done and the sacrifices the 
greater community has made for yifu 
to get lo UCLA, 

As students entering UCLA. I 
challenge you to be active. cTitical 
"consumers' and 'contributors" of 
information both inside and outside 
the classn.Him More importantly go 
beyond thought and dialogue and ini- 
tiate progressive action that will 



impact yiHir own life and the lives ol 
the people around you 

If our experience at UCLA is 
intended to prepare us for life beyond 
college, we must engage in activities 
that will broaden our prospective and 
understanding ot ourselves and the 
world around us 

The reality is that a holistk 
approach to education can not occur 
within the confines of the classroom 
As such. I encourage you to get 
involved irt the various student activi- 
ties on campus 

I ICL A has a long tradition of stu- 
dent activism that has greatly 
enhanced student life Student organi- 
zations help provide alternative 
means of education through pro- 
gramming on issues such as sexuality, 
gender, diverse cultural experiences, 
labor and environmenuil issues, polit- 
ical participation and religion 

In addition, there are sludent-initi- 
ated programs that work to retain stu- 
dents on campus, such as the Student 
Retention C enter and USAC" s 
Student Welfare CommissK»n 

Lastly, as UCLA students we are 
valuaMe rcMmrces to the greater com- 
munity It IS imponant that we partK- 
ipatc in activities that connect us back 



lo the a>mmunity The Community 
Programs Office, the Student 
Initiated Outreach ( ommittee and 
USAC's Community Service 
Commission provide opportunities 
for students to work in the Los 
Angeles community as mentors and 
counselors, as well as to provide edu- 
cation on issues such as health, cul- 
ture and individual rights. 

Our involvement in sludefit gov- 
ernment and student organizations 
provides an opptfrtunity for us lo 
develop as well-rounded individuals 
with an understanding of social 
responsibility, which positively 
impacts our abihty to achieve acade- 
mically 

Student activism and collective 
action with diversity as the guiding 
principle is the key to maintain the 
excellence of our university. We must 
be active, because wc recognize that 
we are a part oT history We have the 
power lo shape our own education 
and what UCLA will be for the future 
gcneralions to come 

I wish you great luck on your first 
year at UCLA and encourage you 
take advantage of every resource, 
especially USAC. for support in your 
educational pursuits 



How TO SUBMIT 
TO VIEWPOINT 



■ A'cii ,1 thr<^- lo lou' p<9r opinion style 
submission About » currvnl timnt on c«mpus 
or in ttw iworld Jt I<r9e or writp » rv^ponsr to 
sofnpthinq thtt you h«vr alrv«dy r«ad in Thp 
Rfuin 

■ i ■tnai\ uibmittions lo 
v«v«ipomf«*m«<lM ucl* edu n »niti n b»i to 



copy and paste your submntion into the body 
of thr rmatl or drop ofl « Itard copy of your 
tubmisuon «t itw OMy Iniln oMcc d tS 

Kerckhoff HaM) c«re of Jwwtt Utm 

■ Appty to be « Vi t wpoin i cotunwsHt dur 
inq W il l i s 7 and t of aKti quarter 



e-mail eapmsing your mtefvtt to Ihe 
Viewpoivtt aoopns 

A Mw iHwiqs to refwefwoer 

• M i ub m i w ons mutt mclude your name 
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I ai* a fiytfiiN. itwy iMM ilw Miiirfi yaur 



• Itour Pacts wm be ctwdwd; 
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' Apply to be a canowwM or artitt Sand an ttudeni ID number, year and 



n)r cisnty. ^"nwiiar ano 



i)ail\ Hruin Viewpoint 



VIoikIjv liim'ifi 2«Mi| 21 



Students must take an active role in their education 



k Getting involved in 

activities, taking broad range of 
courses enhance university life 



Some beginning students approach college 
like baby birds - heads tilted back, waiijng to 
be fed 

But public universities such as UCLA are 
not like mother birds They are big and some- 
what impersonal machines and they can't be 
trusted lo bring you what you need or to take 
care of yOu You have to kH>k alter yourself in 
order lo create an educational experience that 
you can look back on with pleasure and pride 

At UCLA, you have to take a much more 
active TcAc in creating your educational experi- 
ence than was the case m high school or junior 
college By and large, that is a good thing since 
It teaches you how to look after your own edu- 
cation, and that's Ihe best thing you could pos- 
sibly learn here If you learn to look after your- 
self in this way. UCLA can give you one of the 
best enperienc-es of your life 

There is an t»ld Iranian proverb stating that, 
in education, you should try to "light a fire 
ralher than fill a pail " In other words. increa.v 
ing your knowledge is important but the main 
thing about education is lighting up a passion 
in yourself 

If you can find y«>ur way to that pa.ssion. 
everything else will come naturally to you. 4 
sincere love of knowledge will keep you 
expanding yourself and becoming more capii- 
ble lor the rest ol-your life 
' UCLA IS a place where you can come tt> 
catch fire 

Of course, it is confusing to try lo put 
together an education lor ytturself and culli- 
vale your passions before you are entirely sure 
ol what you really want out of life This confu- 
sion can be very stressful' But a certain 
amount of confusion is part of growth ,!•- mhi 
have no doubt figured out and if you can 
remain aware of that fact yi>u will go easier on 
younelf. ; ' ' 

Here are a few rules of thumb thaTcafi1li4|^ 

you 

> 

WMker is an assistant profpssor in the political sci- 
erKe department ar>d was The recipient of last 
year's Distinguished Teaching Award You can e- 
maii bim at b«MaN(^ucla.edu. 




n 



Try to get a g<HKl general education, one 
that stretches your sense of who you arc Take 
classes in many diflerent areas and keep open- 
ing yourself u|^ each year 

Sit m on classes even if you are not enrolled 
in them in order to get a taste for diflerent sub- 
ject areas Talk to your lellov^ students about 
what they are studying fcxpose yourself lo as 
much as possible in order lo discover what 
your natural talents and predilections liie 

Maybe you have a real knack for microbi«>l- 
ogy that you didn t knn>» about, or a gift for 
Milton scholarship that w ill make you the env y 
of your lellou students and open up a highly 
satisfying career Maybe you are the new 
Picasso But you will never kni>w until you gel 
your hands on a paintbrush or a piece of char- 
coal 

You cannot find out your own particular 
gifts and talents if y<ni don I experiment and 
explore. So don't kKk yourself into a narrow 
pathway until you absolutely have to 

Another rule ol thumb is that one of the best 
things about the university is the people 

Modern I S life can be pretty lonely IX>n't 
be fooled into thinking that the great social 
environment you find in college will ct>ntinue 
forever The college experience is one of the 
only chances you will have to constantly meet 
•<new people, team from them, and to build 



frieridships lor life 

You should do everything you can lo take 
advantage ot this special window of opportuni- 
ty. For example, it is a gtHnl idea to join clubs 
and groups, especially if you're shy or start \o 
feel depressed and overwhelmed 

Faced with a hea\y workload, your first 
temptation will always be to stjuirrel y(»ur.sell 
away with your computer 

But let your watchword be Balance' 
Students who participate in clubs and assocui- 
tions while cowfmuing to pay attention tt) their 
schot»lwork lend, on average, lo get better' 
grades than students who just stick ii> their 
b<H>ks In part, this js because being with other 
people stimulates the mind and expands your 
emotional capacity 

In clubs and associations, you exercise parts 
of yourself that won't get developed in y«iur 
classes \ou can also pick up skills that will be 
very valuaNe ti> you later in life 

Reaching i>ul to other people is aK* > useful 
lor studying ( realing study circles and discuv 
sion groups can help you get much more out i>f 
your classes ihan il you just kept to yourself all 
the time Class Web site discussion b*iards can 
he an excellent way to organi/e people like 
this ^ 

When people \^ork tt)gether they see more 
than each would individually, learning lo listen 



to other people is one of the keys to education 
Again, the more you reach out lo other peiv 
ple the more you shake ofl your shyness ami 
open yourself up lo friendships 

Many of you have to lake jobs to get 
through college Always remember that you 
will be working for the rest of your life, but 
that you only get one chance of going to col- 
lege You should do everything you can to 
make your college life a prutril) during these 

years. C'""^"'''" ';.■'•'■ V''' ''•^■'-^ 

Could you w\rk fewer hoars ffyoadSidwAdy 

with luxuries ' 

You might consider this as an option since il 
can help open up time lor more studying, a 
deeper engagement with extracurricular activi- 
ties and friends, or time lor the other things 
that make this period of your life unique 

When you finish college, you will have lo 
make many decisions that will inHuence you 
lor the rest of your life You w ill have lo start 
thinking about chi>osing a career, about which 
city lo live m and perhaps who lo lake as a 
marriage partner. 

You might see your college career as a lime 
when you train yourself to make these chtnces. 
The best way to tram yourself ivto become a 
well-rounded individual 

The university has been designed as a UhiI to 
help you do that 

Mathematics and the sciences tram your 
brain lo think logically and rationally to lot»k 
for cNidence and argument ralher than being 
f(M>lcd by HutTand fireworks 

The humanities train your sensiliMty and 
ludgmcnl. sharpen your eyes^open your ears, 
and leach you how to express yourself with 
elTicicncy and resonance 

Philosciphy hones your sense of principle 
and shows you how to orient yourself in the 
moral world 

Sports and club life can relax you. leach ytni 
how to deal with groups of people and to play 
well with others 

Deep in Us heart, the university contains .1 
picture of a fully reali/ud human being Thi>se 
who gel the most out of their time here seek 
out that vision and orient themselves toward it 

If you grasp this fact and work towards this 
deep Msu>n. your time here will be much more 
rewarding than if you |ust sit back and expect 
UCl A lo fill you up as if you were a babv bird 

Learning begins with thinking If you think 
hard about what you arc doing here you will 
learn more, have more fun and become a big- 
ger person 



OsstLaVie 



By Jennifer Miyuki Babcock 



1 YAOVEtJ ^ EKE T^ROH PAmvs S 
<,€C0>4t> VEA^ AT UZEELA. 
FW.ST ^E^R 5Tm>E^TS 
f \ikST, oesv> VWE ^ . 

TmM\l>AT\Hfir 
^V4D COL'O 

jLE CAn?OS 
*,ND LECTURE 




"Evn Hou S"vtO0LT>si^T T>E5V\SF ^T=^\ 

HET E-Z-i PKEl>ARA'^^OKi fo^ HiE 
"^^^WMORO^l ^<^ W*Af»T E-Hf VbU 
''AVE AJo r^\E>Jt>^ 




So WH^T VF 



M\&UT A"^ ^'^^ 
REAU^ZATVON^OF "(OOR 

?ATHE-nC ^^^p 
U DMEUX EX\STE\NiCE 

CO UP, tA\SeKK^LE WORLDl 

OiEELA - ^HE WVLLIEACH 

"ioV Zl^T L\FE BBZ. NOT 

A fA\KyTALE WJEETH 
FU-Z.H^,TAL<VviG' SQUIRREISI 

\t^E-bVAE FE2 <.OLt> AiVstO 
JNT\ H CD AT \Vie- -XTUST U<E '^O^ 

r\9sSi dah at u2.EeL^! 



DAILY BRUIN 

lltKerckbofrHall 

ntWtoft wood Plan 

lo» A wylg4. CA90M4 

(310) 82S 9898 

http://www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 



Unsigned} editorwis rcpiewnt » m«|ority opmion of the 
Daity Brum EdtofW loafd. AM other columns, letters 
and artwoffc r9ptr \ enx the opinioos of the«r authors 

All sutMTiincd material must bear the author s name. 
addiesv telephone number, registration number or 
affiliation with UCLA Names wHI not be withheld 
except m e m re m e cases 



The Bfuin complies with tf>e ConMnunicatton 
Board's pokey prohibitir>g the publication of articles 
that perpetuate derogatory cultural or ethnK stereo 
types 

KMhen multiple authors submit material some 
names may be kept on file rather than published with 
the material The Brum re serves the right to edit sub 



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paper All submissions become the property of The 
Brum The Communications Board has a medw gnev 
ance prcKedure for resolving complaints against any of 
Its publications For a copy of the complete procedure 
contact ttie Publications office at 118 Kerctthoff HaM 



\luM(lj\ limi".j:. nxt\ 



DaiK Kruiii Viewpoint 



DaiK Brum Viewpoint 



M<m<faiy. Junr 25. 2001 23 



Speaks Out 



If you could change one thing about your UCLA experience, 
what would It be and why^ 



loshud Silberman 

Computer sciente 

I J like 
i.> ncc niDFc 
rcspcci lur 
the .irt> .It 
thi> univcrsi- 
l\ More 
nuincs Is 
alN^Jvs the 
bigg'ot 
thmj£ but 
puWiCH\ IS also important It 
t SA(. vkerc to su\ ' Thisis what s 
going on ■ or even il the Dail> 
Bruin where to tell people when 
things arc h> putting inlormation 
in better spots rather than the 
back page ol the A&F section 
e»ne da\ in advance, that would be 
.1 reallv nice change ' , 




Michelle Chung 
History and efonomics 

I think It 
all reallv has 
to do w iih 
the si/e ol 
the popula- 
tion I think 
il It were a 
smaller cam- 
pus, you d 
be less inhib- 
ited to get to know the people i>n 
vour campus LiCL.A is big and 
impersonal I Icel like y(Mi never 
see the same person again - 
maybe onlv once a year - so 
>ou re discouraged from getting 
to know that person " 





NowanaLundy 

Socioloqv and histofy 

I would have made it more fun 
lor black people to Ik here tvcr 
since thev t(K>k awav the spot 
where we kick it the Brum Bear 
and lowered our numbers, we have 
been more jocused on ptilitical 
issues, and we didn t have tinu- to 
worry about having tun Whites 
have rralcrnities and dilTerent par- 
ties, but people ol color don t have 
that same luxury I would have made it so it would haVe 
been easier to have parties I would have had a spot 
where It was ctxtl lor us to kick It on campus " 

Tnonus Lew 

Psychology . ' 

"I would lower the price ol text- 
books The university already gets 
money from elsewhere They have 
tuition money, they have parking 
ticket money, sti they can afford to 
reduce the cost of books Every 
other day you get a ticket from the 
meters " 





Sociology and history ''■■''..■; ■'^""i: 

•J would say the diversity I 

don't see a lot i)f diversity on this 
canlpus. and even so. everyone is 
separated bv their ethnicity or 
class On other campuses, there s 
diversitv and yt>u have people of 
dilTerent backgrounds hanging 
out together, interacting Here 
you have dilTerent people, but 
thev re all in their ow n clique 
Maybe programs that promote inieractuMi between the 
groups would helpi" ; ' 



PsychotHology ' •..,-".•;'■.;■ ^ '•";-•/■ ■^■ 

"I like everything here I dont 
know why. but I haven't had any 
bad experiences yet Everything 
has worked out the way it was sup- 
posed to work out Everything I 
came here lo do to get into med- 
ical school, academics and to have 
fun - It all happened I wouldn't 
change a thing." 




Speaks Out cornpiled by Edward Cbiao, Daily Brum Senior Staff Photos-toy LuAnne Dtngiasan, Daily Brum Contributor 



LIEF 

From page 20 

•ipparentlv thev dot^t have a chapter 

\\ell the dean l^ ccrtainlv netting an 
.inurv letter lioni me and Anthonv 

I dv^ald^ about that 

Then ii hit me it wasalreadv Hi 
.1 111 .ind nobodv had beaten the liMnu 
^i.ip I '111 ot me I was neither in .i 
!jaih.ii.\ ^aii MO! .inoinied vMih .1 
Ki,.K UK Miiii >e,i Internet brethren. 

II ,• I A.i> sa\ed Irom thai >coiiri:e ot 
imt' >vlui.>! ilic dumb i.tok Al l.isi 



Darwin had taken care of him Ntw I 
onlv have to deal w ith the guys at 
I (LA who weren t C(h>I entnigh to be 
the dumb Hvks m high schtnil and are 
making up lor it now You know, the 
ones who walk around saving "Dude, 
that s s»H>oo gav all the time 
Seriously thi>se guvs are so homiwphiv 
bicus I m ii>tallv ROTKL .) Ha. 
■SNORT'" 

I tinallv got [o class and you would- 
n I believe it but this lotallv hot girl sat 
next lo me V^e struck up a conversa- 
tion .md she rocks She s.iys she > still 
vv Ith her bov triend Irom high sch<H»l. 



which IS back in Michigan Score' This 
will take me to levels ol platonic 
friendship never before imagined I've 
got to tell vou guys, this place is great 
The women here bring a much-needed 
stiphisiication to the art ol lying It s 
reallv a refreshing break from the 
overt rejection of high schtwl girls 

S<1 then I went to the Bomb Shelter 
for lunch, not far from the "Cjiant • 
Waxv f^ars" sculpture a tribute to 
nerd-kind everywhere I struck up a 
conversiition with the guv next to me 
I told him the IihhJ was "hcUa-gcxxl " 
He then pummeled me sensekss for 



an hour and a half It is a slang-habil I 
had better correct at all available, 
speed 

But this IS all a prelude to the best 
night ever I went back to my 
dorm walk-in closet where mv nxim- 
mate was waiting lor me He s wav 
taller than me. like. 5"7" or si>mething 
I mean, he s freiiking huge 1 shall 
hereafter refer to him as Lotharg the 
Destroyer, as a tribute to the great 
ogre warrmr Lolharg from Terry 
BrixAs " Th^Elfsiones olShannara" 
He's a nice enough guv. but he listens 
to a lot of music from the Loud and 



Crappy genre. ; * 

Well. L<rtharg got Tne iirto a frat 
party, where apparently appreciation 
of Loud and Crappy is mandatory It 
was pretty cckiI for a while but then 
they brought m all this foam It was 
fun to swim in the stuff until the foam 
had a bad chemical reaction with the 
cartridge in mv inhaler and st>me kid 
wound up with third-degree acid 
burns We decided that would be a 
gtHtd time lo leave for the apartment 
parties 




wf^&M 



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BROOKES 

FrampagrM 

10 .10 am I dt>n t think I'm 
down with this "group bathroom 
down the hall" deal I told daddy 
that I wanted one of those suites, 
but no. I get stuck in a double in 
Sproul Hall I have to weiir flip-flops 
in the shower and blow-dry my hair 
in front of other girls What is that 
abouf^On top of everything. I have 
to walk down the hall m my robe for 
the whole world to see No one sees 
me looking anything less than my 
best, and I swear on everything holy 
that if a hot guy^sees me looktn| like 
this. I will sue tlie scho«9: 

I L.^Oa.m Oh no. oh no. all no' I 
think I'm sweating! Its so hot. so 
very hot. and I'm wearing my brand 
new Prada silk sleeveless blouse! I 
think I might die How can I possi- 
bly be eiqKCted lo walk all the way 
to campus everyday"' By the time I 
make it to Dodd Hall, my hair will 
be flat, my makeup will be dripping 
off my face, and Citxl forbid I 
should smell like sweat' Maybe if 
my dad donated some more money 

Ffomp«ge22 

\ wasn't keen on the idea of drink- 
ing so<alled akohol. hilt thankfully 
someone had left some individual 
servings ol Jell-O out on a tray, and 
you know how we nerds love our 
scmi-gelatinous non-Newttmian 
solids, hmm hey' 

Why this all happens on a 
Thursday night is a mystery tome 

1>upposedlv It dates back \o a fas- 
cist CluuKdlor m the !9.V)s wht) tried 
lo declare thai ail -students entering 
UCLA would now respect his new 
Year Zeto calendar, wherein the 
Sabbath day of rest would be moved 
to Thursday to coiiKide with the 
Chancellor s daughter s piano 
lessons/ Bacchanalia 

Getting back to the party, the next 
thing I knew. Lotharg was pressing 
himself against a mirror, claiming he 
was 'Lord of the Cilas.s" so I had to 
correct him because Brynwynnyll is 
Lord of the Glass. I mean. duh. 
Lotharg is supposed to be guardian of 
the sacred cudgel LOL' 



Live tong and prosper, 

and accomplish that by 

not saying "hella." 



I was feeling a little dizTy 
kind o( like that great high you pel- 
when you find that first sword with a 
-^7 against ores But then I turned 
around and saw that hot girl from 
dan again. Sorry to say I was too 
Hasted to remember her name, but 
gomg on probability alone, a UCLA 
faMMk liai a 7t percent chaitce of 
being either Jennifer or Sarah 

Jennisarah told me that she realty 
feh like ike oo«M ttk lo me, which H 
girl code for "regardless of sexual ark 
entatKNi, I'm gomg to treat you like 
my new gay friend " She gets to dump 
all her problems on me. and I get to 
ln« the Ik that I'm not attracted to 
her 24/7. It's nice to rmaHy have a 
relationship that's so evenly give and 
take 

liM here's the best part 

I totally laid down the 
- of Wil card and told her how I 
Ml, and Ae mid that maybe she'd 
consider being interesied in thinking 
akout possibly calling me sometime 
So I looked her m the eye and told her 
"No." I then walked out with my dig- 
nity intact, had some more spetnal 
itM). and (as I was later inf<Minad) 
got it on with the Oreplace 

Aad K>. MagKdndci. I bid yoa a 
nnd Bran fafcwd. \Jtit long and 
prtnper, and a ccompl fh that by not 
' End traiwmMMon K-) 



to the school, they °d consider 
putting in some son of electronic 
walkway like the ones they have at 
the airport'.' 

.\nd \ock at these other girls 
walking down the street, in public, 
wearing shorts and T-shirts. My 
G(xl. have they no shame' 

I p.m. I cannot believe the men 
. in this school I'm sitting in lecture 
waiting for cbss to begin and this 
guy asks me out OK. he was kind o\ 
cute, m that "I shop at Gap kind of 
way." but come on' He actually 
asked me if I d like to go see a 
movie with him some time A 
movie'' Maybe Id go to dinner at 
Spago. if he was lucky, but a S6 
movie'' Is he crazy'' Does he actual- 
ly think that I'd grace him with my 
presence for S6'' Doesn t anyone at 
this school have any grooming? 

I was offered no personal atten- 
tion during that 5(N>-person history 
lecture, and i always gel personal, 
attention And God only knows -: 
what my TA was wearing. I'm Mxij. 
but tight denim shorts arc just not 
allowed on men, ever 

4 p.m. I actually met a girl this 
afternoon who lives m the same uni- 



verse as I do She was standing in 
line in Ackerman I nion waiting to 
buv some sushi frum the Japanese 
place, when I spotted her cute (hloe 
lop and knew we could be friends It 
turns out she s from North ( ountv 
San Diego like me' What a relief to 
know that this school isn't >ust full 
of a bunch of people who have 
never been Ui a fashion show in 
Pans She told me that it s supposed 
to be pretty wild tonight over at the 
frats. and that there are even some 
fraternities where having money is 
common' Fabulous Hove soirees 
So. she'll meet nne m front of Sproul 
Hall at *i p.m 



I'm at the frats and 

there's nothing to 

dricik but b«er. Beed 



6:30 p.m.: \hhhh! This is what 
they call food'' They tell me that 
UCLA dorm food is rated as one of 
the top in the nation, but come on' 



If this IS considered g(H>d. what 
must they be eating at »»ther 
sch(H)ls'' It looks like it will be salad 
everv night for me I did hear that 
thev have sushi for lunch everv 
Mondav. but what am I supposed to 
do for the rest of the week' 

It was bud enough that I had to 
eat lunch in a cafeteria m high 
school, but now they expect me to 
eat in one three tfmes a day I belter, 
call daddv and have him send up a 
care package or stime money. 
Maybe I'll just cat out every night I 
can always take a cab down to the 
village and eat at F.urochow. 

10:30 p.m. Im at the frats and 
there's nothing to drink but beer. 
Beer' Has it really come to this"' It's 
not even good beer, and I have to 
fight just to get It What happened 
to cocktails, good old-fashioned 
alcohol or maybe a nice, aged white 
wine' And I've had to hold onto my 
'^rse all night so it won't get stolen 

There isn't even any food If this 
were my party, there would be wait- 
ers walking around with mini crab 
cakes Instead. I'm forced to tumble 
down to In-N-Out if I get hungry 
Why. God. why'! " 



12:30 a.m.: As if Ihadn t dealt 
with enough alreadv I broke mv 
Manolo Blahnick shiK's walking 
back t»> the dorms I can'l believe it. ' 
a S40(l pair of shiK-s down the toilet 
It s terrible how those sidewalks 
near the dorms are so lull of cracks 
That's whv I fell it was one of 
those horrible sidewalk cracks It 
had absolutely nothing to do with 
the fact that I was a bit tipsy noth- 
ing at all 

I als(> spilled my Diet Coke all 
over the fltKW at ln-N-()ut. right in 
front of a certain celebrity whom I 
will not name I'm so tired right now 
that I can barely think, let alone 
write, but I km>w that if I don't 
write this down in mv journal I will 
regret it later 

I'll need this to use as evidence 
when I explain to dad whv I need to 
go to Europe during winter break 
There's onlv so much a girl can han- 
dle' 

And now off to bed I have class 
at noon (how are they allowed to 
hold classes that earlv in the morn- 
ing^l- and I'm sure my charming 
roommates alarm ckKk will be 
going off in a matter oi hours Ta-la 




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1 Sunset Canyon 
Recreation Center 

With two pools 10 
adjacent tennis courts 
a grassy area tor play 
ing or picnicking ana 
a sand volleyball 
court tfiis recreation 
facility north of tfie 
Sunset Village dorms 
provides an outdoor 
venue for students to 
. stay in shape year 
round For more infor 
mation call 825-3671 



r. r 



3 Pauley Pavilion 

-)•!', 'naiiona! championsnic Danners 
2'dce tne rafters' of Pauley Pavilion 
'^ome-cou'-' tor UCLAs legendary 
oasKetDal volleyball and gymnas- 
tics teams While in towrrto play the 
LOS Anqeies Lakers dunng June s 
NBA. finals the Philadelphia 76ers 
ana league most valuable player 
Alien iversor practiced at Pauley 

Pavilion 



5. Ackerman Union 

"'"ne ground floor o* UCLAs 
student union houses a 
group of retail outlets where 
Shoppers can buy anything 
from Blue Books to 
Be^rWear to computers 
Ackerman also houses a 
oost office textbook store 
nar salon restaurants and 
arcade Conrii^cled by cov- 
ered walkway to Ackerman 
IS Kerckhoff Hall the loca- 
tion of student government 
and student group offices 
ncluding the Daily Brum 



6. Geffen Playhouse 

The Geffen Playhouse 
Duts on five plays a 
season both classic 
ana current It is affili- 
dted with The UCLA 
School o* Theater 
P^rr ana Television 
-)ftering classes work 
snopt and internships 
Last season the 
Playhouse opened its 
doors to Create f^iow' 
ar irgani/ation tor at- 
nsk Los Angeles 
teens Many of the 
youths had never 
seen a play before M 






-IK V t 






\l(Mt(ij\ .Unit' I'k li(M»l 



;i.^v;.^,;.v,:„- 



2. Covel Commons 

Most students know 
Covel as home to one 
of tfie dorms largest 
dining halls, but It is 
much more than that 
The Scholarship 
Resource Center a 
suite of rooms set 
aside for academic 
tutonng and a com- 
puter lab are also 
housed there 



' f 



^ ! hf f 



G 



tfff 



i 



II V 



i 



f- 



r^^M 






■^ 



10 



/•_ 






11 



I I 



fl tlllll 
D 



.-"■S 



J^ -\ 



I. Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture 
Garden 

Surrounded by Dickson Bunche and 
Macgowan Halls and the Public Policy 
Building the sculpture garden is a 
grassy area where students can go to 
relax between classes catch a midday 
nap or browse among more than 70 
sculptures - each the work of a promi- 
nent artist such as Henri Matisse Joan 
Miro and Auguste Rodin 

9. Sports Fields 

At Drake Stadium you can 
run laps on the same track 
that legendary Olympic 
athletes like Jackie Joyner 
Kersee Florence Griffith 
Joyr>er and Rater Johnson 
trair>ed on On ttie ' 
Intramural Field, ordinary 
students get to be )ocks 
tor a day competing in a 
multitude of intramural 
sports You had better 
hurry though, because ttie 
field IS going to close for 
tt>e next two years while a 
parking structure is built 
under it. 



10. John WoodMT) Canter 

The Wooden Center is a tree health club for 
UCLA students Inside you can lift weights 
or scale rock walls There are courts for 
basketball and racquett>all You can even 
tumble on mats 

* 

I Arthur Ashe Student Health and 
J Wellness Center 

Adiacent to tfie Wooden Center is UCLAs 
health and wellness center It is named after 
Arthur Ashe, the tennis star and humanitari- 
an who was the Brums No 1 player during 
part of his time at UCLA in the 1960S and ~ 
later went on to be the first African 
Amencan to win Wimbiedo- 



4. Strathmore 
Building 

Or>e of the newest 
structures on cam- 
pus the 
Strathmore 
Building contains 
the offices of 
Parking Services 
ttie Career Center 
and the EXPO 
Internship and 
Study Abroad 
Office 



-*>-. 



'^l 



rr 



*1" 



PEARL 
HARBOR 



7. Mlann VHm 
"Fox" Theater 

Built in the style of 
many of the picture 
places" of the day. the 
Mann Village tf>eater - origi- 
nally the Fox Village Theater - 
was completed in 1931 and 
included seating for 1.400 people. 
an ornate lot)t)y. velvet curtains and 
coucf>es m tfie bathrooms Since then 
the tfieater has hosted ttie openings of 
many of Hollywood's bkx^buster films 
But wfien ftie opening of 1991 s t^ew 
Jack City' was delayed a crowd ttiat had 
gathered around ftie ttieater to see ttie 
movie turned violent Fifteen hundred 
people rampagiBd through ttie Village, . 
breaking storefront wiridows. 



11. Murphy Hall 

Murphy Hall the administrative 
headquarters is a place that every 
student is likely to pass through dur- 
ing their tinne at UCLA Among other 
services it is the tiome of ttie 
Registrar s Office the Office of 
Students with Disabilities Student 
Psychological Services Academic 
Counseling Services and the 
Honors Programs Office 



13. Armand Hammer 
Museum of Art and 
Cultural Center 

According to its Web 
site ttie museum "illu- 
minates the depth and 
diversity of artistic 
expression through the 
centuries, with a special 
emphasis on the art of 
our time ' Its facilities 
include a large indoor 
exhibition space and an 
outdoor courtyard, 
which IS sometimes 
used for member s 
openings or movie pre- 
mier parties Admission 
IS free for UCLA stu- 
dents with ID 



10S7 Qayley Ave (310)209-1111 
1049 Ga^ey Ave (310)208-2676 
I'aM.Y.nBa lOSeOiiyleyAMe (310)206^f71 
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12. Mildred E Mathias Botanical Garden 

A haven tor nature lovers on campus the botanical garden boasts 
5 000 species of plants The garden s namesake Midlred Mathias 
was a UCLA faculty member from 1947 1974 She wanted to be a 
high school math and science teacher when she went to college tHJt 
scheduling conflicts forced her to tane some botany classes dunng 
her junior year She became one of the world s foremost experts m 
plant taxonomy 



rr 



26 



Daily Bruin 



A Iih'IkIIn KiniiHtti 



The Daily Brum publish*^ 
wt't*kl> during summer, so 
voull hdvf to wait a little 
longer for vour crossword fix 

\h)iida\. Juno 25. 2<H»1 



T^Arts 

Jliiiterta 







Daily Brain Senior Stiff 

Pertiapt one of the main reaions UCLA 
studeiitt watch so much idevuton is the 
fist that thr ddightful pro-ams on their 
beloved boob tube come completely free of 
coat. 

Many students, however, aic unaware of 
dK fact that they cm ■!■) Moad bw tap- 
mgs of many of Ikdr fMoaile riwws with- 
out maicing a dent in their dismal savmgs 
accounts. 

Partiapating in (be studio audience^i of 
teievBion sho«v tapings has become a staple 
of the freshmen dorm experience its dorm 
residents will commonly watch their 
favorite TV stars m action at studios all 
around the Los Angeles area. 

"It's a community builder becauae Hoors 
get totether and they re watdung the show 
tofether." said Joe Manko. the program 
coordinator for Hedrick Hall who is a fifth- 
year hatory /political science/sociology stu- 
dent "And usually they pay you S 10 to SI5 
a head to go to the show It's a way of get- 
ting money but it's alto about doing it in a 
fun way where everytxxlys interacting." 

Program assistants of residence haOs 
often arraafc for members on their floor to 



of nowB 
•r-Theli 



■ 
Leno." 

"We oHMly fa>«e a 
year who go to 'The Price 
HiHko aid. ThM't fwl fM 
aflyaataafa 



"TV Price 
with Jty 




Other groupi have foae to go tee The 
Tooii^t Show.' 'HoBywood Squares' and 
sitcoms" 

PAs reserve group tickets monltas n 
advance so between 20 and 25 memters of . 
their floor can attend a taping of "The Price 
IS Right " 

On the day of the tapim. fnapa of 
UCLA students arrive M lhriaaia«ari|r in 
the morning. 

Before the show, the 
assistant mterview the 
in order to determine who wil compete on 
the show In the past. UCLA I 
gotten the chance to be 
some have even won "The Price it Itighr 
ShovacaK Showdaan 

Dariat the rtwa^audieiice members pan 
see aspects of the fibnnig that are not 
diownonTV 



1 32 




Senior Anita Mdc chats with AlexTrebek at a tapir>g of 
'Jeopardy' last year. - * 



Tours aim to introduce people to 'rear Beverly HBIs 



ART: City to show it has 
more to offer than stars, 
shopping, *90210' drama 



By 

Daily Brum Senior Staff 

The television series "Beverly Hills 
%2I0" added to the rich, shopping- 
fnendly stereotype of the Southern 
( alifomia locale However, the city of 
Beverly Hills hopes that the open-air 
trolley tours it sponsors will prove to 
visitors and residents alike that there is 
more to that zip ccxle than Rixleo 
t>ive 

With so much myth-breaking \o be 
done and «> much to share abt>ut the 
true Beverly Hills, the citv feels it necev 
sarv to create two separate trolley 
lours, the Art and Architecture 
Trolley lour" and the "Sites and 
Scenes Trolley Tour "" These t<Hirs will 
run through Dec 2^ Tuesdays through 
Saturdays on the hour beginning at 
noon 

According to UCLA alumni Robin 
Chancelior. the director oi communi- 
cations and marketing for the city of 
Beverly Hills, an original trolley tour 



that has been running since I9K8 
focused mainly on the entertainment 
aspects of the city In 19% the city 
decided to revitalize the program, 
adding the ""Art and Architecture 
Trolley Tour." and renaming and 
updatmg the original tour to the 'Sites 
and Scenes Trolley Tour." 

The job of refreshing the Trolley 
Tours was left to Michele MemH. the 
cultural services manager for the city of 
Beverly Hills who helped select the 
attractions featured on the tours, m 
addition to writing the scripts for the 
tour guide docents 

'I put some an into the 'Sites and 
SceiKs Trolley Tour" because it focused 
most heavily on the entertainment 
aspects and sohk of the glitzy hotels." 
she said in an interview from her office 
m the Beverly Hills Library 

Merrill added that the decision to 
create a second tour that focused solely 
on the aesthetic components of the city 
camt about when Beverly Hills was 
undergoing a lot of new anistK alter- 
dlK^ns One such addition was that of 
Sothcbys. a large well-known auction 
h<Hisc originally from tngland. as well 
as the Ciagosian Ciallery. a contempo- 
T»r\ art gHllery that hailed from Niew 
York 



Though the 40-minute-long "Sites 
and Scenes TroHcy Tour" doesn't make 
any stops as it peruses through the 
city's restaurant and sh<.)pping distria. 
the longer 50-minute "Art and 
Architecture Trolley Tour" does make 
a few slops, enabling ndcrs to see, the 
amazing art of the city. 

According to Chancellor. 10- to 20- 
minute stops are made i^t the Museum 
of Televnion and Radio, which was 
designed by Richard Meier, the archi- 
tect for the J Paul Getty Museum and 
the Gagosian Gallery, as weU as at the 
Creative Artists Agency, which fea- 
tures a Roy Lichtensiem piece in its 
lobby 

"Any students that are interested in 
architecture construction wouU proba- 
Ny find interestmg the different signifi- 
cant architectural huiMings throughout 
the city." Chancelbr said ot the attrac- 
tions featured in the "Art and 
Architecture Trolley Tour " 

"For students, however, it just 
depends on what their area of mterest is 
because you get a very good exposure 
to the business triangle and all the dif- 
ferent restaurants and shopping areas 
with the "Sites and Scenes Trolley 
Tour," she added 

Though the tours hope to downfilay 



the celebrity-populated image of 
Beverly Hills, for those still interested 
m siKer-pamled fire hydrants charac- 
teristic of the city, the 'Sites and Scenes 
Troley Tour" proves more than ade- 
quate This tour takes nders up and 
around the infamous Beverly Hills 
Hotel, where actor John Behishi com- 
mitted suicide and also travels through 
the rcsidentuy districts, pointing out 
the former homes of household names 
such as Candice Bergen ("Murphy 
Brown" ) and Will Rogers, who was the 
honorary mayor of Beverly HiBs. 

The tours are led by certiHed and 
trained docents wiio provide a narra- 
tive as the troNeys make their way 
through Beverly Hills These tour 
guides are useful in that they are knowl- 
edgeable in the hotoncal aspects of the 
city, as well as the latest additions 
Memll. wtio has selected and trained 
some of the current docents. said that 
though a pamd acnpt is followed, the 
nde IS far from bonng as the guides 
improvise to make the journey hvdy 
and fun 

"Docents are kind of interesting 
becauae they have to be like an aclor." 
she said "They can't just be somebody 
who sits there and memorizes and 
reads the icnfK. they have to add a httle 



bit of drama and cokn to their presen- 
tation" 

Though Merrill added that some of 
the best docenU have been people with 
a background m actmg. something in 
keeping with the Beverly Hiik unage 
that behind every comer there is aa 
aapinng actor, the tours seem to be 
making soaK haadway afaowt the 
glamoroas iaaifH ef Rodw Drive that 
have become a stereotype of the city. 

"It's a gyaai way ior bath readMH 

al the different mpecn of the city." 
ChMiceBor said 'We have al different 
kmdt of art pieoes on diiphqr through- 
out the city and tiie tours are an oppor- 
tunity to expose the public to the art 
and all the different hatoncal ekmenU 
of dK city." 

lOUHc The 'Art arid AfcNtKUNV Tradey 
Tour* artd the "Silat and Scenes Trdley 
Tour' leave from the comer ov Raaaa 
Drive and Dayton \My in Bawr^r Mm. 
Tickets ar« $5 for aduks and $1 for chil- 
dren and can ha paschased from the 
docent on a Uni C8at|,int served basis. 
The tours run through Dec. 29, and 
baginnaig July 3 through Lahor Omf 
waahend they wN run every hour from 
rwon until 5 pim For ttw wka s i and hol- 
iday schedule call (310) 2BS-243t. 



Daitv'Bruin Arts & EatrrtainnM'nl 



Mondav.:iunc2r.. 2<M»I 27 



Sunset Strip hot spots relieve campus boredom 



MUSIC (Concert venues, 
clubs keep niphllife of 
area alive iuul jumping 



By 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

It has du/zled the city and sur- 
rounding area for ages, and its righi 
up the street from UCLA ()n any 
given night it can be packed with 
loads of traffic Go on the weekends, 
and It's a madhouse There have been 
mobsters, politicians and countless 
celebrities adorning the street Yes. 
ladies and gentlemen, it is 
Hoilywood'k playground: the famous 
Sunset Strip. 

If a Brum ever tires of Westwood 
nightlife and wants to hit up some 
real entertainment. Sunset Boulevard 
has several locations guaranteed to 
have the houest bands, performing 
artists and clubs. 

Thekn Chib 

Closest to UCLA aiKl first on the 
list IS thf key Club Located on 9039 
Sunset Blvd . the Key Cluh is a bump- 
ing three-level club that provides 
entertainment galore There's a VIP 
lounge, a full service restaurant, a 
regular club level, three bars and even 
a martini bar For a trendier atmos- 
phere, the Key Club houses "Club 
Wicked." the upscale dance club (no 
casual wear) for the IK-and-over 
crowd, cverv Wednesday. For the 
^nking-age club-hoppers, the Key 
Club hosts 21-and-over nights on 
Fridays and Saturdays 

The Key Club also hosts a wide 
range of shows 

"We pretty much have anything 
here that can fit anv kind oi mood 
that you can ever have. ' siud .\m> 
Bellas, the Key's public relations 
coordinator 

Confirming this statement is the 
plethora of performers the Kcv Cluh 
has hosted KRS-1 pcrlormcd there 
reccntK. us well as bands such as the 



( ircle Jerks. Face-to-Facc and ja// 
guitarist Al 13i McoLt hven the 
Cirque du Solcil has graced then 
stage 

Tlw Rox> TheakT 

The next venue is the Roxy 
Theater. ItKated on 9tKW Sunset 
Blvd Since lis founding in 197.^, the 
all-ages venue has served as the 
springboard lor a lot of hands It has 
great music and a casual dress code 
(n*> weapons or chains allowed, ol 
course). Every night has a live Fock 
show, with bands generally pbying 
alternative music, with an occasioiuil 
dose of hardcore flavor The Roxy 
has valet parking, a restaurant and a 
VIP area 



"Everyone Is a VIP here. 

riMlMylar 

Wiisky A Go-Go manager 



Great bands have played a) the 
Roxy Recent shows include Depeche 
Mode. Average White Band, the 
Ambulance. Action Figure Party, 
Anti-Flag and FMiantom Planet Alsti, 
Korn, Jimmies Chicken Shack and 
The Donnas are loyal suppt»rters of 
the Roxv and arc known lb stop by 
frequently 

The Roxy has been around forev - 
er. there's a great sound and every- 
body always has fuh when the>'re 
here." stated Shelly Favarl, personal 
assistant to the Talent Buyer. 

Th<'\>hiKk\ \ Go-Ui 

The Whisky A Go<*o. the 
■ Birthplace of the gi>-go girl" was 
t(Hinded m I9W. where girls m cages 
danced to the burgeoning riK'k n 
roll scene LtKated i>n K9(l| Sunset 
Blvd . il IS a bar and a rock club that 
plays ahernative .inJ Mimetinics pop 



Unconventional shops 
give Melrose character 



CULTURE: Avenue is pood 
place to browse through 
odd stores, pt^ople-watch 



DaHy Bruin Contributor 

Cinderella would be shocked to see 
the window display at Bagh Lady on 
Mclrt>se Avenue, which features unex- , 
pccted fairy gixlmothers in thong*i 
and red feather b<tas. 

Melrose 
Avenue, located ^^_^^^^^m 
in Hi>llywood 
b e t vk c e li 
Highland .Avenue 
-and La Cienega 
Boulevard, offers 
customers an 
eclectic variety of 
clothing With 
stores ranging 
fr«nn pricev Fred ^_^^____ 
Segal to low-cost 
thrift shops, this 

shopping venue is famous for having 
something for every»>ne 

"It's just one ol the places you have 
to go to when you come to 
Caiifomui." said Jacqueline Merntt. a 
Colorado native and employee of the 
Mehoae store Wasteland "We don't 
have places like this wiiere I come 
frt>m " 

Dozens of eyecatching boutiques 
making the stroll 



down MdroK more interesting than 
the average street or shopping mall 
fhe lighted signs, odd store names and 
eccentric windov^ displays also add to 
the endless cntenainmeni 

Shops with extravagant storefronts, 
such as Red Balls display of silver 
spheres protruding from its walls and 
Wasteland's tangled yet artistic mass 
of metal wires, lure shoppers in 

The enticement, however, does not 
stop there Oncx inside, shoppers find 
themselves surrounded with bizarre 
scenerv that resembles a carnival fun- 
house instead ot 
^^^„^,_,.^^_ a clothing store 
Ihis scenerv 
includes fhe alu- 
minum walK 
and columns 
that form the 
base for Red 
Balls' main 
room, and 

Wasteland's vin- 

tage apparel 

that has shop- 
pers thinking 
they have walked into a Moll> 
Ringwald movie 

Adding to Wasteland s distinciive 
atmosphere, is its loads of clothing 
from the '8()s and its racks with an 
abundance of sequins, feathers and 
furs 

Customers with no intention of 
spending mortcy still have a Nast look- 
ing at the outfit setups on the walls and 
talking to the animated employees 



"Everything is so 

different and strange, 

but in a good way." 

Melrose shopper 



music fhe Whisk v alx* serves as a 
dance club on some nights 

1 he Whisk\ wun one ol the higgesi 
venues in the W)s and "'(K, with leg- 
ends like the Doors Buffalo 
Springfield and Led /cppclin. regu- 
larly performing on the small stage 
There are two levels, with two bars 
and a dance tliHtr. which is used as a 
moshing area. 

Though there is no VIP section at 
the Whiskv. "Everyone is a VTP 
here." said general manager Tisa 
Mylar 

Recent shows have included the 
Mightv Mighty Bosslones. Simon 
Says and Sick of it All The Whiskv 
has also seen performances from the 
likes of Buckcherry. Limp Bizkil and 
Korn The Whisky has a long hisitwy 
of presenting liKal bands and nation- 
al bands that rock the intimate stage 

The House Of Blues 

The House of Blues. Hottywobd. 
famous for its multitude ol famous 
names and great shows is liKated on 
MM) Sunset Blvd It is a casual dress, 
multi-laceted venue thai presents 
reggae, blues, hip hop. rock in' 
Espaiiol. punk. rtK'k or just about any 
other music genre depending on the 
given night 

The House of Blues has a members 
only rtHim. called The Foundation 
RiH)m." and also a restaurant, known 
as "The Porch" 

There are several diflerent club 
nights and all-night events, such as 
"Sin Nights. " that take place at the 
House of Blues The venues arc either 
IK an^ver i>r 21 and over, depend- 
ing on the show 

The Hyuse ol Blues' musicTiall has 
been blesNcd with the presence M 
manv great artists over the years 
fcric Clapton. Paul Mc( artncv. KC 
and the Sunshine Band and 
Reverend W (ireen have all per- 
formed on the prestigious stage 
Rcceni ,sh«>ws have included the likes 
of Cappadonna. the Doobie 
Brothers Buju Banton. Social 
Distortion and even Mandv M<H»ie 



HOT SPOTS ON SUNSET 




8430 Sunset BM. 
For information on 
the House of Blurs, 
call (323) 848-S100 





6215SunatlM. 

For information on tltt 

Hollywood PaHidNMn. 

uU (323) 962-7600 



8901 Sunset IM 

For infonnation on the 

mmkff h-fuhOo. call (310) 652-4202 




Key CM 

9039 Sunsft Blvd 
For information on 
the Kfy Club, call 
(310)786 1712 



WKt MMidUi^llirtai IWMMkr tWItrCM IkrNOI IkrNMwP 




For infonnation on the 
RoKy Theater, call (310) 276-2222 



with Evan & Jaron 

"(The House of Blues) is where the 
heart meets the st>ul." said Jennifer 
Kahn. marketing manager of the 
House o\ Blues. 

HollywtMKl t*alladium 

Last, but certamly not least, is the 
Hollywood Palladium. Uicated on 
h2I^SiInsct Blvd 1 irsi opened in 
l')4(). the Pahaduim is a site that has 
contained countless numbers ol 
celebrities politicians, music groups 
and has housed several award cere- 
monies With a rich historv that 
includes everyone from former 
Presidents Truman and Fisenht>wer 
to riK'k n roll bands to British rt)yal- 
IV. the Palladium offers wt>rld-class 
entertainment 



VICTOK CMIN/tXpIv S<u.o 

The Palladium has a giant dance 
floor and state-of-the-art lighting and 
sound systems Glen Miller and 
Frank Sinatra held concerts there 
during the '40s Durmg the '6()s and 
*70s. the Rolling Stones and the Who 
also played in the Palladium Recent 
shows include bands ranging from 
Blink 1 82 to Latin ja// performances. 

The Sunset Strip is a dclinite relief 
lr»>m the tensions o( I ( I. \ and has a 
great history surrounding it It is one 
of the lew places on earth that has 
seen such famous names m the past 
and still continues to bring in the 
famouv names oi the present Other 
college campuses have nothing even 
remotelv as significant as the Strip 
Being so close to school, it is a defi- 
nite perk that contnhutes to the extra- 
ordin.irv commiinttv ol 1 il \ 




There are a wide variety of clothing stores located on Melrose Aven 
Segal to the reasonably priced attire of Retail Slut. 

Nevertheless. th«>se li>oking l(>r 
more urbane and sophisticated cloth 
ing with designer labels will have no 
problem finding it 



This IS what keeps Melrose s repu- 
tation as a popular shopping area for 
years, attracting btith ItKals and 
tourists 

Red Balls and Wasteland, along 
with the majontv ol the street's other 
stores, like Retail Slut, known for its 
gothic apparel, and ,^ti>mic (jarage. a 
lavonle among skaters and surfers, 
arc all reasonaNy priced and cater to 
the younger generation 

"The clothing on Melrose is lunkv 
and contemporary," Merntt said 
"The average customer ^ange^ from 
13 to 25. but we have siimething to 
offer everyfjody." 



Boutiques such as Betsc> Johnson 
offer unique clothing at higher prices 
With dresses ranging from SIM) to 
S20<). this boutique not onlv oflcrs 
high quality, but guarantees individu- 
ality through their clothes 

The first Bet,sey Johnson shop 
opened on Melrose in I9K6, and 
according to the manager, business 
has always been good Its ItKatton. 
along with its well-known name 
attracts people to the small shop 



ue, ranging from the pricey Fred 

Melrose's famous name and \»lld 
atmosphere entice shoppers nintmue 
to frequent the famous avenue 

"You don't find evervday sUilt 
here" said Nicole Lawn. 20. a regular 
Melrose shopper "Everything is so 
diffcren! and strange, but in a giHid 
way ■ 

■"It's not very likely you will run 
into someone wearing the same shirt 
as you when you get it on Melrose, but 
if ycHi shop at the Gap. or any other 
major clothing store, you look like 
everybody ehie Shopping heie gives 



"TllK 



\i<.iuid\. itiiK :::. 2(mii 



DaiK Kruiiv Artk 4 EalrrUnnment 



Stargazers can 



• • 



out celebs atiocal hangouts 



CULTURE: H()ll>v\(K)d hoi spots 
like Spapo pi\e visitors chance 
to \ iev\ famous laces up close 



By 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

While vtime people daydream of eating 
lunch wuh their favorite stars, others wait lor 
hours belorc premieres and alter concerts just 
u> catch a glimpse ol them 

Ht)wever. there^is an easier way 

Since celebrities are known to lead "normal" 

lues we can invariably lead "normal" lives 

^ with them Wc can g<i lo the same restaurants. 

the same bars, and even take the same dance 

classes as them 

I rom word ol mouth and a little research or\ 
\^hcrc cciebriiies choose lo spend their lime. I 
am viMting a lew popular places lo see how sim- 
ple 11 is u> spot and hang out with the stars 

The I'lrsl place on m\ schedule is a 
irendv cale on Melrose Avenue called 
I rthCafle _ --rr^ 

The place i> alu.ivs packed 
with people sipping the resiau- 
lani s organic teas, eating Us t 
iow-lat meals, and sociali/ing / 
.>t) Its perlcct-lor-people- 
v^alchlng palio 

1 here are celebrities. 
iiki.- Meg R\an. who arc 
^Ul.h regulars that the 
workcfv knos^ wh.ii the 
nI.hs Aanl even 
^icIiTc iliev order 
( )iic ol the pre 
K'li^ ni.iiiager- 
A .iNii ! oiiK lalkine 
itMiii which 

. ciehrilie^ i came 
!i mil ,thi' about 
Aii.ii iheii lavunlc 
^ iiul^ I'l ie.i were: 
..ml Hoiiiiic 

\K \cil .1 uaiiresN 
.i! .1 nLiehhoniie 

\noihci >pi>i 
:.im«Hi> !'>! It 
.cli.-brii\ Muhi 



ings IS a bar and club on ( ahucnga Boulevard 
called Hollywood t anleen. which has served as 
a home lo celebrities lor years 

Once owned by actor 
Betle Davis in the l«MOs, it — — ^— — ^ 
began as a place lor ser- 
vicemen with celebrities 
waiting on them In 1991. 
the lounder ol Virgin 
Records. billionaire 

Richard Branson, turned 
the place into a clubhouse 

that catered only to enter- 

tainment 

Its two new owners. 
John Kim and Michael Sutton, took over Tivc 
years ago and revamped the place into a bar 
and a restaurant With only three weeks since 
Its new liKation and opening, the place is 
packed nearly every night 

In HollywtuMl. il people start talking, its 
like seeing a giH>d movie." Kim said "Andifits 
hard to gel in. pe<.>ple want 



Rap stars Dr. Dre and 
Snoop Dogg recently 

had a party at the 
(Hollywood Canteen). 



to get in more On Thursday nights, we turn 

away a hundred people, and they come back 

Frbm its VIP ritom to its grassy bar area with 

' a shark lank, the bar's 

■■■■■■"■^^^™~" atmosphere is peculiarly 

warm yet modem Three 

separate parts of 

Hollywood Canteen arc 

supposed to simulate the 

atmosphere of New York. 

Los Angeles and Miami 

This ambience is undoubi- 

ediy what draws the 

celebrities in 

"Usually at a club the 
music IS really loud and you can't move." Kim 
said, "but celebrities like this place because this 
looks like the backyard of someone's house, 
like you're going to a house party." 

I did not run into any stars during my vmi*. 
but even when people do. ihey are known to 
keep their cool in this often star-studded 
bar 




"When you walk into a place this size and see 
Leonardo DiCapno. Matt Damon and Sean 
'Puffy' Combs, people think it's cool." ICim 
said "But no one really bt>thcrs them lis most- 
ly entertainment people here, like studio execu- 
tives or assistants, so they're not so star-stuck 
and run upio them" 

Rap suri Dr Dre and Snoop Dogg recently 
had a party\|t the bar. and a private UCLA 
graduation party was also planned to be held 
there Despite what its name might imply. 
Hollywood Canteen is not exclusive to only 
Hollywood and its denizens 

If not at the bar. celebrities can get their 
groove on in a dance studio On my previous 
visits 'to Millennium Dance Complex. 1 have 
run into recording artists Britney Spears. Mya 
and Pink The studio provides a convenient 
way to spot the stars while getting a good work- 
out and first-rate instruction from lUtop^lMWC- 
ographers 

•| don't think people come in only 
for (the celebrities)." said Levis 
Francis. manager of 

Millennium "We have some 
of the best cla.sses and instruc- 
tors here Wade Robstin. wht) 
teaches every other Friday 
night, choreographed for 
Britney Spears and 'NSYNC. 
The celebrities usually only 
rent studio space, but some 
aisi) take the group dance 
classes with the regular 
students 
"Just 
every 
day. 
some 

ty 



about 
single 
there's 
N^ Miiiic celebri- 
Jp ty here," 
^ ' Francis said 
They, gener- 
ally woh't 
come and take 
the dance cla.s.ses 
with everyone 
else, but I know 
that 'NSYNC has 
come and taken 
classes a couple of 
times, and I know a 
lot of the new 



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Westwood landmarks 



show blockbuster hits 



HLM: Theaters ofler glimpse 
of old-fashioned HoDywood 
glamour, classic architecture 



By( 
OMtyBnunSufl 

\ isiWc even from the d»»rms on ihe hill. 
the WcsIvickkJ to\ mo\ le spire beckons siu- 
dents lo Its box nflkc. showing the nevkcst 
flick Hoil\ wcHHi has lu ofler 

Three landmurk WestwiKni theaters, the 
Mann Village Thcaier (InrmerK known as 
the Fox WestwiMKJ Theater), the Mann 
Brum Theater, and the C rest, capture ele- 
ments ol Westwood s histor> and the 
m«ivie-going experiefKC ol an earlier era 
The> otVer studcnt!> a giunpsc ot the pusi as 



they watch the latest blockbuster 

In the |yiOs. UCLA moved from its 
campus near present-daN L..\ ('it> 
( oUegc. to Its present kKation The'Jansk 
Investment C ompanv designed >fcesiwiHxl 
Village as a communitv anmnd the schiHtl 
An an jur> selected an architectural slyk* 
lor Ihe Village a coUmial Spanish- 
Mediterranean design Mart X^anamakcr. 
vice president of the Lt>s Anfeies City 
Hi.slorical S<Kietv. said that WesiwiHid's 
design was unique lor Li>s Angeles 

"Its'like being m Paris where yixi can 
clearK see the f-.iflel lower, the opera 
h«)u.se.' Wanamaker siiid "In \^estwt.K»d 
you liMik up and can see its landmarks from 
ditVerenl vantage pi>ints ' 




The Mann Brum, built in 1937, and other theaters such as the Mann Village are tangible 
reminders of the past 



Plane crash transcripts inspire play New movies demonstrate 

prevalence of sex in dty 



THEATER: Catastrophes 
performed by actors with 
naA 'black box' dialogic 



By 

Daily Brum Senior Stdff 

As ill-fated airplanes nialfunclinn 
•a $mil»K and pilots despcratelv 
attempt to land, small recording 
devices called the C ockpit Voice 
Recorders. als«) known as "black 
boxes." capture the irftense .sounds 
that resonate throughout the air- 
piiine. 

Needless lo sa\. the black boxes of 
these craiihed airplanes a>niajn 



some of the most chilling and dra- 
matic real-life dialogue ever record- 
ed 

"Charlie Victor Romeo." a the- 
atrical documentary coming to 
I CT A s Macgowan Little Theater 
on \Vednesda\, is lormed entirelv ol 
SIX transcripts rect>rded bv black 
boxes that have been recovered from 
various airplane crashes 

According one ot the creators ot 
the play. Irving (iregory. the sht>w 
has thus far elicited incredibly 
intense reactions from audiences 

."Our show IS like a thriller, it 
leaves pcitple stunned and shiK'ked ' 
he said from New York during a 
recent inierview "After certain 
scenes. I can he«r a lt>t ol ga.sps frimi 



the audiences it s an intense the- 
atrical experience " 

This theatrical documcntar>. cre- 
ated b> Ciregory. Bofct Berger and 
Patrick Daniels. i»pcned in CX:ti>ber 
ol I'JV** and was originalK going to 
run for only five weeks The enthusi- 
astic response trom audiences, how- 
ever, convinced the sh»>w > creators 
lo continue to perlorm it for audi- 
ences acn>ss the I 'nited States 

• We were initially going lo run the 
show tor 20 shows. ' Daniels said 
■".As s4H»n as We started we realized 
we had lo extend People were call- 
ing and the phtme was ringing otT the 
h4H>k " 




afly^ruttL 




COLUMN. Tho9rf#ir5on 

VVesI C.oast aren't doinp it 
hke the> do in New V)rk 

It must be an [^t<'oast thine \i 
least, that is the onlv explanation 
that could make two ol this sum- 
mer s New Nork love draitU'dics 
understandable \o us p<H»r sexuallv- 
reprevscd West ( oasiers 

B«»th ■Ka.sl FiKxl. Kast Women" 
and "Sidewalks of New ^ork" are 
sujipt>sed to lake realistic l<H»ks at the 
complications of se\ and love, but if 
these are what relationships n( sexual 



freedom are all 
abtiul in the Big 
Apple n IS time 
to pack my bags 
It sail abi>ut 
sex Sure. 
hloll\wxK>d has 
been telling us 
this since the 
dawn ol popular 
culture, albeit 
much to the div 
may of religious 
and right-wing 




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Daity tiruin Arts 4 EiitertaiBiiieHt 




HOLMBERG 

From page 29 



It may be possible to spot celebrities dining at the Hollywood Canteen in West 
Hollywood 



STARS 

From page 2S 

,ir:isiv will .1' U1.-I1 " * 

li - .ihM'lulcK luil iiitinmlalinj: lor rcpulai 
pc.iplc hcnUiNC thai > nu>\\ ol our Liicniclc 
\i.luall\ lhf\ like that c:clcb^lllc^ come bccauNC 
lhc\ alwav'^ waiil to get a chance to see who\ 
(.oniiiii; 111 ne\l. I rancis adiled 

Slar ualclierN oiiK lia\c lo walk down the slu- 
il!o N .ii-<K It' -.ee ihe Mjined (I) cases and 
I>oslcl^ nl !\rese lessn.a Simpson, lennilei 
1 'pe/ aiKl Hritnev Spears anioni: others, wuh 
:\'^on.i' !(i.ink-\i)us wiiiien out lo Millennium 
I lie l.isi place on iv\ tisi lo visu. and the mosi 
'h\;.>u^ I- N^ollijaiij.' I'lick s Be\erl\ HilK 
■ csi.iiii.ini Spai;i> 

hi adilition tobeini! tilled with celebrities dur- 
iiL' .miuiai Xc.idcnn •X'Vvards atter-parties. it is 
kit.>wii lo cater to the niosi well-known people 
\Mih the most lalked-abotit names on a regular 



hasis 

During m\ usit. All L,andr>. Iamt>us tor her 
l^orili>s commercials, was sitting at a table ad|a- 
ccnt lo me Wollgang Puck paid a personal v isit 
to her and her lunch date but must hasc torgol- 
ten lo visit m> table 

Whether it is the Doritos mcnlel or Britnex 
Spears. I still get that immediate surge o( excilc- 
ineni when seeing a star However. I have actu- 
all\ never approached a celebrilv unless I was 
introduced to one Alter living in Los Angeles 
lor so manv years, it almost becomes second 
nature to run into a celebrilv 

It Is easier to spot celebrities in these popular 
hangouts than at events such as premieres where 
thev are bombarded v^ith cra/ed tans and cut- 
ihroal paparazzi 

These spots provide a close view ol ihe stars. 
rather than a mere. sighting, .md allow you lo 
hang out with celebrities without having to go 
through the trouble ol getting your people to call 
their people 



griHips And this Ickus on sex makes sense. 
icK). since It IS one ol the three vital acts necesr 
sar\ lor the survival of human kind, the other 
two being breathing and eating which admit- 
tedly have limited cinematic value 

Sex. therelore. is an important part of our 
culture that warrant^^ expression in artistic 
endeavors 

New York and Los Angeles are t)tten con- 
sidered to be the two cultural capitals ol the 
I niled Stales, so somewhere in between, 
probablv around Ohio, there has been a seri- 
ous disruption in sexual coi>sciousness 

Here, on the West C kuu>l. scx is stxncthing 
to be talked about and 
thought about and man- " 
ilested not m action but ^^^^^"~'^~" 

in enticing and or reveal- 
ing clothing, prelerablv 
leather 

There is nothing defi- 
cient in the sex drives ol 
us West ( oasiers. but 
let's just say it the sexual 
energv gone wasted 
could he harnessed, con- 
sider California s p«iwer 
crisis solved 

The New Yorkers, 
however, are walking the 
walk th.ii. Irom (nir limited view is only an 
idealistic lanla.sy To quote Cieorgc Michael's 
clear-cut song * I Want Your Sex", it is appar- 
ent that Sex is natural 'Sex is gtHnl Not 
everybodv dtvs it But cverybodv should " 

()h. and tht>se cra/y Fast C oa.si dwellers 
do It with anyb»Kly. liHi That is, «»r course, il 
we believe everything we see in the movies 

And wh\ not believe these films'^Onlv IN 
million or the six billion inhabilanis of the 
world live in \ew York so what di) the rest ol 
Us ignorani r(x>ls know abinjt a cily where 
people live in bt>roughs and travel in under- 
ground tunnels' Sounds a lot like a bunch ot 
rabbits 

Well that mav be the answer to all the con- 
liision abt»ul New York Rabbits are the sell- 



Oh, and those crazy 
East Coast dwellers do 

it with anybody, too. 
That is, of course, if we 
believe everything we 
' see in the movies. 



priKlaimed ( if they cxiuld speak that is) icons 
of free love Therefore, rampiuu nex a undcr- 
stjindabie in a city like that 

The ev idence is about as obvious as 
Qeorge Michael's lyrics In Amob HoUek's 
"hast hood. Fa«t Women. " a .^5-ycar-okl 
waitress. Bella ( Anna Thomson), is looking 
tm love in all the 4rrong places 

While unhappily sleeping with un older 
theater diretlor. she fiiuls that elusive paitsion 
in the womanizing Brurio. played casuallv by 
Jamie Harris, who. also happens to be sleep- 
ing with various women of all ages who find 
their wav into his cab First-date sex is gotxl. 
.ind is expected to be in this wimdcrfully alien 
world 

This could be pa.<<sed off as a fantasy if 
Eulward Burns' new comedy. "Sidewalks of 
,. New York." was not 

waiting in the next bed- 

rtKim. begging for its 
turn. Arranged as a 
scries of mcick inter- 
views, we are led into 
the panik. I mean pains 
of three uliimatelv inter- 
twined relationships 
Heather Graham. 
RosarioOav^'Stin. 
Dennis Farina atx^ 
Stanley Tucci all show 

up UM)king lor some 

action, and pretty much 
■: all leave satisfied The 
number i»f sexmil partners ranges from three 
to .SU(). wlucta i)kta||i) b> even "laduttry" «t«ii- 
dards '■^ . 

In both films, everything about sex is dis- 
cus.sed openlv. from affairs lo placing cologne 
on that "special place " It is an expected and 
completely accepted part of relationships. 

In addition lo ihese iwo new films, a num- 
ber ot other New Y brk-ba.sed sex comedies 
prowl the shelves PracticalK any Wcxidy 
Allen film, mosi notably "Annie Hall" and 
"Everything You Always Wanted ti> know 
aKwit Sex. " is New York-based and r(N>ted 
deeplv. verv deeply in sexual farce 

And where would u Ci>lumn about EuMt 





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IV .luni'ifi. 2(K)I 31 



PLAY 

FrofnpageM 

The !>etup is a>implc Eight 
iictors pcrti>rm ihc six diflerent air- 
plane catuittrophcs on a .set con.sisi- 
ing unl) ot the noiie o\ an airplane 
of a common commercial airline 

Coming up with the idea and 
getting the pla\ olT the ground, 
however, was a much more com- 
plicated prcHXss 

The idea's conception began m 
1999 when the plav's three cre- 
Mlors had involved themselves in a 
diaciuision about the V2K cra/c 
and its relation to the media s 
obsession with .shock value 

"We were talking about htm 
Y2K relates to the sort ot exploita- 
tion in the media ot sex and vuv 
lence. this conversation was ong(v 
ing and we were all sort ot engaged 
in It." Daniels said 

When in a book store. Berger 
showed Gregory a book ol ctKkpit 
voice recorder transcripts as an 
example or books that are mark% 
ed lor their.shock value 

As the two read the accounts of 
the crushes. Berger than suggested 
that the\ make a plav on this topic 

■erger. Gregory and Daniels 
thus began the lengthy process ol 
making their idea a reality 

"The three of us sort of ttxA it 
from there and chose a general 
group ol transcripts that we 
thought were gtxid to do as a the- 
ater piece." Daniels said "We 
picked the performers that we 
wanted to be in the thing. We were 
talking about how you might make 
a set. how you might do the lights, 
what kind of audio you might sup- 
ply & we just came up with it and 
jumped " 

Due to the small size of their 
performing group. Collective 
Unconscious. Berger. Circgory. 



and Daniels all had to pertorm 
multiple tasks m putting together 
Ihe play 

"Were alsi> performers." said 
Cjregory "We're a small operation 
so we got lo do all that w« can ' 

The three were in charge ol 
financial aspects, interviews, the 
set design, production and much 
more 

In organizing the play, the ltc- 
alors recognized the sieriousness of 
their endeavor and always made 
sure to be respectful of tht>se who 
died in the crashes 



"We were trying as 

much as possible to 

be ... respectful of the 

people who died,* 

Patncfc Daniels 

Play's co-creator 



"Reading the transcripts, we 
were thinking. Ciod. this is very 
serK>us siulT We had lo take it 
seriously and produce it with an 
eye to make it sod of reverent 
rather than taking advantage of 
the subject matter." Daniels said 

Nonetheless Daniels said that 
various individuals voiced their 
disgust about the subiect matter of 
the documentary and viewed its 
creators as exploiting the deaths of 
the airplane passengers 

"Some people have argued that 
we have sort ol exploited it to an 
extent." Daniels said "It's an 
exploitation \o a degree regardless 
of what you do. but we were trying 
as much as possible to be very 
careful and respectful of the petv 
pte who dwd. The people that 



bring that up as a major issue arc 
generally people who haven I seen 
the play " 

The plav has been well received, 
however, by audiences across the 
country It won many awards 
including $50.(HHl for the "Absolut 
Angel .Arts and lechnology 
Award " 

The past iwn years, the troupe 
performed the play to groups in 
the aviation and miedical commu- 
nities as an educationaT KhiI 

"When people told me thm 
Charlie Victor Romeo' was a 
potentially life-saving perfor- 
manct^and that perhaps lile-sav- 
mg lechnology iNnild be devel- 
oped out of It. It took my breath 
away " Berger said "1 never 
expected to be at use at that 
hitch " :.:':■ 

Daniels hopes ifiat the portray- 
al of the plane's passengers as 
4Kroes will rid viewers of any neg- 
/alive views they may have brought 
with them to the sho>» 

"People bring their own set of 
expectations to the table when 
they come to sec the show 
(jencrally speaking, were sort of 
dashing those and rtplacinj: them 
with another set. which is some- 
thing very simple and more or less 
p<ntrays all of the people as 
hert»es They're trying to save their 
own lives, first and foremost, but 
they re also fighting lo keep the 
plane in Ihe air and fighting to save 
all the pas.sengers' lives as well." 

TNEJITER: 'Charti« Victor Romeo' 
opens on Wednesday and runs 
through July 1 5 at Macgo«Man Little 
Theater Performances m at 8 p.m. 
and cost $35 for general admission 
and $12 for UCLA students with a 
valid BruinCard Tickets can t)e pur- 
cttased at Central Ticket Office. For 
more information or to charge tick- 
ets by phone call (310) 825 2101 



HOLMBERG 

From page M 

CoMst sex be without mentioning Sarah 
Jesftica Parker s pop- 
ular Sex m the 

City "' Sexis the ^"^^"""""^ 

thing, and New York 
IS the plitc^ to do It 

Now, lo talk 
ab«Hit West ( oa.sl 
sex comedies Well, 
there is, of course 
and then there is 

Apparently, the ■ 

number of West 

( oast bedr(H>m comedies are filmed m 
inverse proportion to the rising tally of 
MadtMina's partners In a strange way. 
this lack itf films about West ( oast sex is 
expected, given the generally repressed, 
or restrained depending on your inclina- 
tion, attitude towards it 

Sex here seems lo he better in the 
abstract There is no denying the sheer 
volume of sexually suggestive billboards 
lining Sunset Strip, but who is doing any- 
thing about It'' Southern C alilornia is the 
perlect embt»diment of this superficial 



MELROSE 

FrompagfZT 

you a chance to be yoursdt. to be origi- 
nal." Lawn added 

Apart from cU>lhing^Melro9e also 
offers eccenlric b*H)k. record and gift 
shops 

Stores such as Wacko. The Soap Plant 
and The Wound & Wound Toy 
Company, all provide peculiar and 
delightlully entertaining gifts fivr every 
occasion 

Although shopping is what Melrose 
thrives i>n. the street s people-watching 
experience adds to its growing reputa- 
tion as a hot spot 

The individuals on Melrose dilTer just 



sexuality because it is a culture based on 
fashion, style and overall appcar>uice II 
It IS below the surface, let it stay there 
That Is what the policeman lokJ inc any- 
way 

If art mirrors 
lite, then It is time 
""^^^'^""""~" \v take a long Unijc 
afour relkction 
lakmg morality 
out of the equa- 
tion. It isu wisc 
idea lo consKk'i 
the potential 
cITecis ol the sexu- 
al dismissal occur- 
ring throughout 
the Western edge of the I nited States 

New Yorkers, the cra/y bunny rabbits 
that they are. deal with scx^s the natural- 
ly understandable part ot stKiety that 
Cieorge Michael would certainly 
approve of Or maybe none of this exists, 
and It IS all just a fantasy created in the 
minds ol misled filmmakers Alter all. 
the\ are »>nlv movies 



Southern California 

is the perfect 

embodiment of 

superficial sexuality 



To^ir>d out if Holmberg lives by George 
Michael's lyrics, you can e-mail him at 
dholmbrg(^ucla.edu 



as much as the cUtthes. and one can 
encounter people with mohawks and 
fishnet stiKkings just as easily as trendy 
business men in suits and lies The diver- 
sity that Melri>se oflers adds lo its excit- 
ing atmosphere, leaving visitors without 
a moment ol boredom 

Since the majority of college students 
arc young and. m«>st importantly, penni- 
less. Melrose oflers trendy, sensibly 
priced attire fi>r those who cannot afford 
the posh shops on R»xleo Drive 

So. Ihe next time Melrose shoppet>v 
come across someime wearing 1!>2(K) 
jeans from Dolce hi (iabbana. they can 
pride themselves m knowing that people 
can look just as giH)d in a pair of SI5 
Levis thrift stwe jeans found on 
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SHOWS 

From page M 

"When lhe> bring in new prizes 
land chanyc the set. lhe> have to stop 
ia tfiere is a little down time." said 
guest relations manager lor CBS 
Karen Winchell "During that time 
Boh (Barker) talks to the audience, 
and that s when he takes their que*- 
lions 

Accitrding to WinchelL the show is 
pi>pular among college students, 
bringing them troip across the nation 
to the tapings.- 

"They come from all over 
Especially during spring break It 
starts in earl> March, because spring 
break starts back there earlier We get 
college kids year-round, but we get a 
lot or college kids during the spring." 

The Price is Right" is filmed 
Monday through Thursday. tVM> to 
three weeks ot each month. 



Oftentimes, guests get 

to see bloopers that get 

cut from the program. 



AlflKMigh lite ftice is Right" is 
one of the most popubr tapmgs stu- 
dents go !iee with their fkx>r. students 
can also attend tapmgs of such pro- 
grams as."F-ricnds," "Just ShcxH Me." 
"Will ft Grace." "Whose Line is it 
Anyway"'" and more than 30 other 
programs through a company caUed 
Audiences Unlimited 

Audiencxs Linlimited allows large 
groups 10 reserve seats at these tap- 

"There arc fund raising opportunn 
ties lor our shows st) groups like soror- 
ities and traternities can earn money 
lor their organizations You actually 
get paid lor coming to a show." said 
Steve Sheets, ticket department man- 
ager ol Audiences I nlimited 

Pnnluction companies hire 
Audiences Inhmited to provide stu- 
dio audiences for shows that require 
laughter and applause throughout the 
show 

Audiences l>nlimited also has a 
Web site, www.tvtickets.com. where 
customers can order and print IhOt 
own tickets, look at maps to the stu- 
dios, and get information about some 
of the shows 

"Really, the easiest way to obtain 
tickets and the best way to get the most 
information about our show is on our 
Website. Sheets said. 

•However, an individual ticket does, 
not guarantee admission to the show. 
On the day of the taping. Audiences 
linlimited recommends that viewers 
be at iIk studio no less than one hour 
before the taping begins, and guests 
with general admission tickets arc let 
in on a first come, first served basis 

Once in-side the studio, the guests 
are seated and given a brief mtrixluo 
tion on how the show will be filmed 

"All of the shows have what you<:al 
a "warm-up pcrstw. '" Sheets said "It's 
the guy who comes out and gives 
instructions and might set up the 
scTnes before the show starts Then, 
usually the cast will come out and he'll 
mtnxluce the cast to evcrybtxly Then 
they start " 

The scefjes are then usually shot m 
chronological ord^and the audience 
follows along as the story unfolds 

"It's very much like watching a live 
play." Sheets said 

Oftentimes, guests get the chance 
to see the bloopers that get cut front 
the actual program 

"One of the fun parts of the show is 
you get to sec all the bloopers and mi»- 
takes that you don't get to see on TV - 
they forget their lines, start giggling, 
break a door studio audiences get to 
sec aH that stufT.' Sheets said 

And they get to see it for free 

"It d<iesn'l cost anything and it s an 
opportunity to see yinir favorite stars 
and people you watch on TV m pe^ 
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Daily Brum .\rts 4 Eniertainmral 



Mofiddv. Jiim* 25. 2fMH T^a 



THEATERS 

From page 29 

A number of Spanish and 
Mediterranean-inspired towers, spures. 
signs and neon lights served as beacons 
to motorists driving on Wilshirc and 
Sunset Boukrvards One of th^we tow- 
ers belonged to what was formerly 
known as Fox WestwiKxl Theater 

S C'harles Lee. a world-renowned [ 
theater architect, designed the hox and j 
the Brum theaters on the intersection j 
oi Broxton and Weyburn Avenues j 

"When ytHJ enter the Fox, you see it j 
has a very large lobby that gives it a I 
feeling of luxury." said Ted Cioodmg. a ! 
director of the Theater Historical i 
Society of America. "Also, the projec- j 
tion and sound equipment is first-rate j 
You have to have gtKxl equipment 
because this is a college area and stu- 
dents expect that quality." 

The Fox was built in \9^\ with a 
Spanish colonial revival style with 
aspects of moderne - a combination of 
art deco and net>n Art dect) was a 
design of the J92()s and \9Mh with getv 
metnc and /igzag forms, bold outlines 
ami^new building materials 

The Fox movie company added the 
distina Fox Tower, a Wesiwcxxl land- 
mark, after they bought it from the 
JaiMB Company. 

The Brum wa.s constructed in 1937, 
using neon as a main element 

Being buih dunng the '20s and Mh. 
these theaters were made in a difTcrent 
era of motion pictures At the same 
time in downtown Los Angeles, mtirc 
than N) large and elaborate theaters 
were built on Bndway 

These "movie palaces" feature opu- 
lent interiors and ambitious architec- 
ture Several of the theaters still tunc- 
tKin today, such as the Los Angeles. 
Orpheum and Palace Theaters. 

The Los Angeles Theater, one of the 
biggest downtown, had a five-story 
lobby, ballroom, restaurant, lavish 
bathrooms, crystal fountain and two 
balconies It even had a "crying r(H>m " 
where mt>thers could take their chil- 
dren ti) avoid di.sturbing other patrons. 
G(K>ding said that the nearby 
Orpheum Theater tixtk 100 people a 
day to operate, including phalanxes of 
ushers 

When sound came to movies in 
1927, theaters were quick to respond 
The Fox and Brum had .sound systems" 
installed when they were built 

From the I97(K and on. multiplexes 
started to replace larger theaters T\k 
C rest Theater, built in I9K7. defied that 
trend with a single large screen and 
.exterior and interior design that piiid 
homiigc to the Fox and Bruin's era. 

Designed by Joe Musil. the (rest 
has an art deco interior with murals 
that line the walls illuminated by Mack 
hghts Musil. also a theater architec- 
ture historian, siiid that m his murals he 
replicated what Westwood and 
Hollywtxid looked like in 19.39 

LtK'ated south of Wilshire on 
Westwood Boulevard, the Crest is also 
known for its state-of-the-art sound 
and projection Musil said that for 
every Disney picture that opens at the 
Crest, a studio technician from Disney 
comes and checks the equipment to 
make sure it's up to certain standards 

"Disney executives wanted a special 
theater m Westwotxl with the same 
qualities their studios had." Musil said 
"They wanted to bfc aMe to go to a the- 
■iBr and .see and hear movies exactly 
Ac way they were put together in the 



that the Crest pr es erv es 
of the traditions of past nM>vie 
watching. 

"Tht movie^going experience is not 
as rasaantK as it ined to be.' Musil 
laid. "The Cre« has two workint stage 
curtains, colored lights and music 
before the show. They all used to do 
that Now a lot of Ihilen don't even 
mKHt a Aiyc crew, and SMw aai mmiv 
iie*aw" 

NotwiUMtandme the trends of 




T^ 



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COME MfOIlK AT THE 

* 

UCLA CENITItAl TICKET OFFICE/ 



DETAILS : 

♦ Now hiring for summer andfaW employment 

♦ Starting pay: $7.39hp v_, 

♦ Flexible scheduling 

♦ Ticket incentives 

♦ &reat work environment 

♦ The UCLA Central Ticket 
Office handles ticketing 
for UCLA Performing Arts 
and UCLA Athletics. 




o 

ticket 



office 

Your UCLA Entertainment Connection 



HOW TO APPLY: 



Come by our ticket windows at the James West Alumni 
Center and pick up an application. Completed applications 
must be turned in to the Central Ticket Office by 5PM on 
Friday, June 29, 2001. 

If you hove any questions, please call (310) 825-2101 and ask 
for Sandra. 



34 



Daily Bruin 



SK'k of looking at 
nudie p«rture« of 
Bnlne> Spears on 
th«' \^b'' Clomf 
visit us onliiit*' 
Click me. biib>. 
om- morr time M 



wwv%.dail.>i>rum. ucla.edu 




orts 



^^^I^^^^H^^^^^^^HM 






mm^^^^^^K^f^ ^^ ** Mcep you m peak 


^H^^^^^mH physical condition here M. 


^^^m^MvciA, , : .^ 


^^^^^^^^^H See pages ^ and M. 



Vlondav Juni>25. 2(N)I 



UCLA walk-ons prove to be true team players 



ATHLETES: Spots on teams 
not guaranteed; man\ cut 
during preseason tryouts 



Daily Brum Senior Staff 

hans arrived at I St s Dcdcaux hicid 
t-xpcciin^ lo >cc a matchup between iwn 
> >l ihe lop pitching pn>specls in the coun- 
ir\ .!> the Trowns' Mark F'rinr was >up- 
pi'Nfd ti^ lact.' i>n againsi the Brums Josh 
K.arp Bu! the duel between the twi> 
pitdicfN who wimld eveniualK hv t.ikcn 
^ccv>nd .tnd M\th inei.ill in ihc 2lMil 
\1a|or 1 caguc Baseball \maleui [>rati 
!n.\cr nuiicnali/ed 

karp pulled a i:roin muscle the week 
^^eiorc aiidw.i- out lor the •>c'ries. which 
v\.iN held th^ past \pril On the mound 
111 hi>. place was ritth->car senior Paul 
[)ia/ wht' at '^ leet Id inches and l^^ 
pounds had the bod\ ol a snowman and 
looked more like ,i K.risp\ Kreme cuv 
lomer ol ilw month than a Division I 
athlete \nd as he began his warnvup it 
was p.imlullv clear he didn t hdtve karp s 
ai!ile mines 

Seeing Diaz hurl his slow-motion last; 
h.ill i.> the plale one Ian veiled. We 
u.ini .losh karp'' 

Diaz however didn I mind that lusi 
.iKuii ^'vervone in attendance tht>ughi 
ih.it he h.id no chance v)t toppling Prior 
Me was Used to the underdog role His 
^U'r^ was like that of manv other walk- 
"is 111 Brum sports 



Walk-on athletes dti not receive schol- 
.irships however. mi>st ot them are 
recruited hven though thev don t 
receive tree tuition, thev are given favw- 
able consideration bv the itdmissions 
board bevond their grades and SAT 
scores 

Olten the reas*in thev don't receive a 
scholarship is due to a lack ot available 
scholarships lor the sport Somciimes a 
I ( I A walk-«in athlete receives schdar- 
ship oilers troni other sch»u>ls but 
prelers attending I CIA 

Kive vciirs ago Dia/ had arrived at 
I (LA as a recruited walk-»>n after a 
stellar but unspectacular prep career at 
Si F rancis High Sch<H)l in nearbv La 
( anad.t His high schiml coach lormer 
Brum baseball and UHUball plaver Jim 
Bonds, had called Brum head coach 
( iar\ Adiims and conv incx'd him to give 
Dia/ a shot 

Because he had been in contact with 
tlu- Brum coaching stall Diaz came to 
I (LA in the tall i>l l'^)^ thinking he 
was guaranteed a ri>sier spt>t That wav 
n t the case 

He was cut during the tryout process 
.ind wasJabeled a blueshirt .As a 
blueshirt. Dia/ couldn t practice with 
the team, nor did he receive any ol the 
cloth rng given to athkrtes His interac- 
Iion with the plavers on the squad was 
limited l»> getting ti^ litt weights with 
them . ^ 

Diaz still returned the lolkwing year 
and despite being all but assured he d be 
cut again. Diaz made the team In the 
spring ot IV«)S Diaz clawed his way out 



of the Brum bullpen to earn eight starts 
when the lop ol the pitching rotation 
was hampered by injury 

Over the next three seasons. Dia/'s 
existence on the Brum squad became 
one which was steadv and reliable He 
threw mostly out ot the bullpen, occa- 
sionally coming in to pitch a lew innings 
when the team was m trouble And last 
year, when the I ICX.A pitching stan was 
once more riddled with mjurv. Diaz 
became a weekend starter 

S«Kcer player Qru Hoshimiya. a 
third-year athletic sophomore. t(K>k a 
slightiv ditlcreni route to I 'CL.\ 

Through high schivl. Hoshimiya was 
a niidf'ieldei iox. the p«iwerhouse 
(laremoni Stars in the Si>uthern 
( alilomia club soccer circuit His team 
twice finished second nationally, win- 
ning several big-namc tournaments 
along the wav 

Like Diaz, it was Hoshimiya himself 
who initiated talks with some ol the 
schiK>ls he was interested in attending 
He sent packets to several college coach- 
es, intorming them ot the tournaments 
he d be at 

Hoshimiya. who graduated trom 
South Pasadena High Schwl in l«wy. 
decided to go to Calitornia when the 
school oflered him a half-scholarship 
After lust one year, however. Hoshimiya 
asked Berkeley lor a release that would 
allow him to talk to other programs 
regarding a possible transfer 

"I wanted to be closer to home and be 



See 



Sun 



Venice Beach is a kaven 
and onlookecs^^aliie 




V ^lA\»^■a .» 



The Venice Boardwalk hosts a multitude of sports irKluding gymnastics, 
skateboarding, handball, weightltfting, basketball and rollerblading. 



By 

Daily Bniin Staff 

It vou re l«H>kmg tor summer sp«>rts 
.iction Venice Beach is the place to be 

I rom surfers to h(»opsters 
iiniscleheads to chess enthusiasts. bic>- 
clists to Naders. Venice Beach has it all 

Just a lew hundred feet trom the 
Santa Monica Pier lies perhaps the 
most competitive sporting venue at 
Venice Beach Chess Park Lined with 
mersized chess pieces m the back- 
jiroiind ( hess Park is a haven for some 
of the I OS Angekrs area s m<>st compel 
line chess players 

L \en it you don t know a pawn from 
a rook the high-stakes action at Chess 
Park IS worth checking out 

Lor a lot ot the guys out here these 
aames are .i mattei of their liveli- 
hiuKls said Adrian Pepper, a sell; 
reputed "-cgular at the park It s atwuvs 
lun to sit back everv now and then and 
Aalch the more experienced players go 
•It It 

Some of the most interesting match- 



es involve cash stakes, complete with 
hand timers and trash-talking from 
both ends of the tabk- 

A lot of the time it comes down to 
two cons trying lo con each other.' 
Pepper added It s definitely tun to 
watch 

Venture larthcr along the bike paths 
and you'll come across Muscle Beach, 
one of Venice s mt>st notabk features 
The athletes here arc certainlv part o\ 
the scene.' said Markus Reinhardt. a 
professional bodybuilder visiting 
Venice Beach and its open free-weight 
gym called Muscle Beach for the first 
lime I couldn t imagine this place 
without the weightlifting or ihe basket- 
ball plavers 

Muscle Beach attracts some of the 
world s most noteworthy bodybuilders, 
not to mention the iKcasional rrkivie 
star <tt m<Klel ArnoW Schwarzenegger 
iind Bruce Lee arc among those who 
once l(H>k part in the lifting atmosphere 
at Muscle Beach 

"The outd<x)r gym here is a great 
opp<irtunit\ lor people who want to gel 




Former walk-on Bruin Paul Diaz winds up before throwing one of 
his trademark off-speed pitches. 



into bodybuilding or who just want to 
maintain their physique.' said Kevin 
Darkes. a member of the Muscle Beach 
facility. 

Neighboring Muscle Beach are the 
Venice Beach basketball courts, anoth- 
er popular area frequented b> sports 
stars It was on these very couns that 
Kobe Bryant sprained his ankle in a 
pick-up game the summer prior lo his 
rix>kie season Even notable Bruins 
such as Bill Walton and Gale CnxKirich 
have come to play m summers past 

"These days, the pick-up games are a 
lot different than they used to be." said 
Felix Lerma. a beach-goer who has 
been playing basketball at the Venice 
courts since 1959 

According to Lerma. there has 
always been mw talent playing in the 
pick-up games at Venice 

There arc some pretiv got»d players 
that play here, but ntost of these guys 
are just a bunch of park bailers." he 
said "Oul of five guys on a team, two of 



41 



Brace yourselves for big 
plays with Bruin sports 



E: Serious fans, 
LSC rivalry, exciting 
wins give I CLA life 

This story has a happy end- 
ing I promise 
But to all you incoming 
I'CL.A students, before yoi^' 
hastily slip on your Brum sweat- 
shirts. T-shirts, hats. earmufTs. 
parkas. 
whatever. I 
thought Id 
let you 
know what 
you're get- 
ting your- 
self into 

Another 
year of 
Brum 
sports IS 
about to 
take off So 
buckle up. * 

there may he a fair amount of 
turbulence on the way 

Back on Feb. 8. some fnends 
and I strapped on our Hak jack- 
ets and headed across town for 
the basketball game between 
UCLA and USC Oh yeah. I 
shouki probably let you in on 
something To you asptrmg 
comedians. L'SC jokes are about 
as difficult lo come by as squir- 
rels on this campus, and no mat- 
ter how bad they are. they're 
alwavs funnv 

So guys, when you see that 
girl start to stare Mankly into the 
distance after you mention your 
ability lo recite the names of the 




crew members of the USS 
Enterprise in reverse alphabeti- 
cal order, jusi make some wise- 
crack about how I'SC is in 
South Central and you'll be 
gravy. Trust me 

OK. back to the story So hcfe 
we are at the dingy Los Angeles 
Sports Arena watching our 
bekwed Bruins duke it out with 
the detested Trojans Most of the 
fans who made the trip are 
diehards. the kittd of fans who 
camp outside of Pauley Pavilion 
days in advaiKe for the best seats 
in the hoase 

Things are naturally rowdy as 
the teams exchange baskets, and 
with the Bruias clinging to a six. 
then four, then ihrce-poinl lead, 
disaster strikes With under two 
minutes left the heart and soul 
of last year s bunch of over- 
achievers, senior point guard 
Earl Watson, fouls out of the 
game 

Although my memory fails 
me as to my exact words, they 
were s uine lhin g like. 'Aw. damn 
It. Watson What the hell » 
wrong with you*" You foul out 
against USC^ We re screwed 
Screwed'" 

But as you will soon see when 
fall sports swing into season, 
none of this uncertainty is really 
out of Ihe ordinary for LiCLA 
sports. Leads are never safe. 
Nothing IS a sure thing 

And that's what makes it al 
so captivatinf. 

As the iniin lead continues to 
dwimfle. a collective gulp over- 



Daily Brum Sparts 



Vf<.ndd\. Junt- 2.'^. 2(M)1 :^5 



Student recreational needs best met at Wooden Center 



FITNESS: Building is now 
undergoing cxinstruclion 
to provide better facilities 



Ddily Bniin Reporter 

One of thc-^reatest phobias ol an 
incoming class, of first-year college stu- 
dents IS the dreaded freshman 15" 
Ihe 15 pounds yixj lose or gam your 
freshman year 

T|>e John W(K>dcn Center 
UCLA's i>wn fitness center, oflers " 
many ways to make sure that the 
weight gaming bug doesn t bite at the 
newest members of the Brum familv 

Whether students are interested in 
racquetball. Tae Ik^. pick-up games ot 
basketball or weight training, the 
Wmxkn Center is the place lor all 
recreational needs 

In order for students to get their 
meals, thev have to swipe their Brum 
c<(£ds lo gain eiitrance to the dining 
halls They can work off all i)f those 
extra calories in the same w av A sim- 
ple swipe of a Brum card al anytime 
between 6 00 a.m and V:45 p m 
(shiwner hours on Saturdays i gams 
free access to most of the WiuHkrii 
C enter's facilities 

The mt>st pt>pular W(H>den ( enter 
features are the weight training and 
cardiovascular exercise machines It is 
often difficult to find an open tread- 
mill or bench press during peak hours, 
which normallv run like LA s after- 
noon freeway rush htiur. frtmi .VOt) to 
6;.Wp.m 

"The treadmill is a major part ot mv 
cardiovascular workiHit. but it s verv 
hard to get one most of the time.' lin- 
guistics major katya Pertsov a said 

In order to give everyone a chance, 
there is a 2(>-minute lime limit for the 
treadmills and a sign up sheet to main- 
tain the running order 

The rtKMn past the wall i>t back- 
packs and kKkers contains enough 
free weights and isolation machines to 
complete the workout of every 



weightlifting enthusiast ^ strong 
weightliftiQg community resides with- 
in the walls of the 3.46K^uare-ftHit 
weight training rtxim Lifters i)flen 
ci>me in packs or meet up with some- 
one during an identical weighl-lrain- 
ing regimen and find themselves a 
workout partner 

If the muskv txlor ot lesimterone is 
loo much lo take, there are main 
other options to burn stime calories 
The nine racquetball courts at 
Wooden are als^^ in high demand but 
simply calling the W«K>den Center 
stall can reserve a court 

Strapping on a pair of Nikes and 
headmg down lo C ollins C ourt. UK.al- 
ed di>wn the corridor lo the right ot the 
front desk, is a surefire wav to find a 
pick-up game of basketball seven day s 
"a week 

The three indcxir basketball courts 
arc always lull and welcome competi- 
tion tor the expert and the nov ice plav 
er alrke Luckv basketball players 
might even get the chance to go up 
.igainst the CCL.A Brum basketball 
players, wb*> every once in a while w ill 
UhA Un a pick-up game at COIIins 
Court when thev re not practicing 
with the team 

The RiK-k Wall diKs cost monev 
but IS definilelv worth a tr\ The Rock 
Wall IS designed for all levels of 
climbers, with many difTercni routes 
to climb for a $^ daily fee Students 
can rent climbing equipment tor an 
extra dollar RiK:k climbing enthusi- 
asts can gel a M\- or ^klav climbing 
-card for $25 and $W). respectivelv 

The $15 quarterlyjcharge lor a fit- 
ness pass IS a price that manv students 
arc willing lo pav to expand their 
Wooden Center experience The Ill- 
ness pass opens Ihe dtx>r lo over M) 
classes that range anywhere from step 
workouts to dance classes like 
Balk;rina B<HMcamp 'The classes arc 
conslanllv ofYered. keeping regular 
schedules bclwc-cn ■':(K) am and 7:(K1 
p m 

Students can also sign up at the 
beginning of the quarter for martial 
arts clasnes in a wide arrav of iradi- 




Second-year international economics student Victoria Hoaytg climbs the rock wall dunng ResFest last year 

tions and styles Every class us readv to 
teach beginners as well as allow 
experts to practice their crafi 

The John WtHiden C enler is the 
capital ot Ihe I 'CLA recreation fami- 
ly, housing Ihe administrative center 
lor all classes and intramural sporlv 
that occur all over the campus 

Despite all of this aclivitv. the 
W<HHkn C enter will be under con- 
struction for a coupk of years during 
their major expansion project B> the 
lime that the incoming freshman arc 
|unK»rs they will have new showers. 
ItKker rot>ms. s;»unas and a weight, 
training r<H>m that will triple the si/e 
of the current one 

"I know a ItM ol people who go to 

AsMcy Karr, a second-year anthropology student, teaches Total 

Knockout, an aerobics class at the Wooden Center 





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CRADIIATF RETURNim. STUDENT'S 
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RELAXATK>N TRAINfNC AND BMIFEFDBAC K 



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CUMC WORKSHOP SERIES 

( tin- v*\wiMl llHlfll^hllfn tea livntf on vhmihjv mii-vs i**!*!!!**! I.i|a« - 
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Monday. June 2*). 20<)I 3' 



To stay in shape, run the scenic route 



PERIMETER: .lo^pin^ anuMid carnpiis can be more 
.iiilcrtamin^ than circlinj: Drake Stadium's track 



;)rtiiv Brum Reporter 

l)«K-> the icrtn trcNhnuin 1"^ 



mcms like >iiu kiu'W 1 p4)rki;(.i up in 
collcp:. Uxi The pcnmcicr land lav- 
ing of'l the d»>ughnulsi ma\ he the 
.ins\^cr tc vour pn>bkms 

But N^hat IS the perimeter' The 



• Hi With lc.it ' 

Runnmi! lap^^irxumi the- Hack at perimeter refers t«> the 4. 5-mik- edgcol 

Drake Stadium max seem tedH>UN. hut I CI A, generallv defined as Veteran- 

-. Jivsa IhanksiiiMn^rilledwttheom- Sunsei-Hilgard-Lei. onic Those who 




For many UCLA students, running the perimeter is a more exciting 
alternative to circling the track at Drake Stadium 



run around the schtK>l »wcar hy II. > 

I think running is the' hest was to 
keep your hod\ in shape and maintain 
\our fitness level. " said sophomt»re 
L'>mnast Angle Dickinson 

kim Anionio.lC'LAs assistant ath- 
letic trainer lor women s hasketball 
water p^^^ and cross ci>unir\. agreed 
i>n the perimeter s henefits 

"It has cardiovascular henefits 
hecause of the long distance, and it is 
hoth anaerobic and aerobic because it 
IS mM continuousK flat, shtrsiud 

.Although st)me pei)ple run the 
perimeter |ust for fun. others use it to' 
tram more scriousK 

"I ran it a lot to tram tor the LA 
Marathon." said assistant sports inlor- 
matum director Dann> Harrington 

Harrington noted that there is an 
e.tsier and harder direction li> run the 
perimeter, the more dilVicult being Le 
C onie. left on Hiigard. left on Sunset, 
and left on Veteran 

It s definiteK hiirder running it one 
wa> because it is more uphill I think 
most peopk run it the easy way.' he 
said 

Although you do n«)t have to be a 
marathon runner, the perimeter is not 
lor everyone 

"I would recommend it for someone 
who uheadv runs, Antonio said "It 



TWO WAYS TO RUN THE 



OFUCIA 



It IS catnmoniy behewd tiMl Ae 
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IQMt BMnRM nipMB MB wiK^B 




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isn t a beginninf run vaikss you 
log/walk i." 

Sprinters also avt>id the 4 5-mSlc ^ 
lance 

"f m a track and field person and a 
spnnter so it doesn't benefit my train- 
ing.' said sophomore Adia Mckinnon. 
w ho ht>kls the Pac- 10 4(M)m titkr. 

Antofvio does n<M think the risk 



VtCTOO CMHl/0*ty Injm 

should prevent the average person 
from running, however. ..;v . ■- 
"If you are wdl-trained. Wttt steii 
risk If you only run once a week. I 
woukin'l recc^mmend the perimeter. 
Everyone is different Some may fed it 
in their shins or ankles or feet.' she 



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ByW 

D«iiy Bruin Reporter 

Contrary to popular bdief. the Los 
Angeles Lakers arc not the only show 
in town just the most expensive. 

The Los Angeles area hosts a bevy 
of professional sports franchises, and 
hidden behind the luster of 
Tinsehown's darling Lakers are some 
of the best ticket dieals in town. 

For those with ambitions of 
stargazing at the Staples Center, the 
Lakers' historic success had made 
ticket availability tighter than a 
Britney Spears outnt. and the prices 
reflect it Tickets stan at $21. if the 
average spectator doesn't mind alti- 
tude, and top out at SI 60 for mid- 
court seating 

For courtside seats, find an agent. 

"The Laker games are for the elite 
people to go to. " said Loida Begley. a 
UCLA graduate student and a late- 
season Gipper ticket purchaser "The 
(Lakers fans) who are actually from 
the city are kind of left out I knew I 
wouldn't be able to get any Laker 
tickets " 

However, the Lakers' success has 
inadvertently made attending a game 
by LA s "other" NBA team, the 
Clippers, more feasible Despite play- 
ing in the shadow of the chantps. the 
Clippers, featuring burgeoning stars 
Lamar Odom and Darius Miles, 
improved by 16 games to a promitiiit 
31-51 record in the tough Western 
Conference last season For half the 
price of Laker tickets, basketball fans 
are likely to see an exciting game with 
the same caliber competition the 
Lakers play. 

Clipper tickets start at $10 for 
upper-deck seating and climb to $26 
for primo views Loge. or lower level 
seating, begins at $35 and climbs to 
$100 at mickrourt 

"The Staples Center is a mac 
place." laid Begtey. who purchased 
seats in the building's upper tier "I 
don't really thmk there are that many 
bad iitMi^y^f 

However, tT you would rather 
watch H pro basketball team that has a 
chance to raise a championship ban- 



ner this season. The Sparks of the 
WN B A may be the ticket for you 

The Sparks, who established a new 
WN BA record by opening this scasoa 
with nine straight wins, arc Staples ; 
Center's newest tenants. Their tickeM . ; 
range in price from a bargain $7.50 la 
: a reasonable $.15 for floor seats 

Compared to basketball pricet,. 
game tickets for Los Angeles' oideil 
professional -sports institution. Uit. 
Dodgers, are arguably a better deaL . 
Led by Cy Young candidate Kevia 
Brown and All-Star Gary ShefTiekl, : 
the Dodpers are currently in the thick 
of the race for the NL West's top spot, 
promising competitive baseball at a 
reasonable price this summer Game 
tickets for the Boys in Blue start at M , 
for outfieki and upper-deck chain, . 
and with 81 home games per seasoa, .■: 
ticket availability is usually a noa> . 
issue The best field views, according 
to the Dodgers, arc in the Blue- 
Preferred section between home plate 
and first base and run a still-afTord> 
able $ 1 5 The most expensive indtvid> 
ual seat in the house is S32. 

Reasonably priced attendance also 
includes Los Angeles' Major League 
Soccer team, the Galaxy. Boasting a 
roster loaded with Oiympic athletes, 
the Galaxy is a perennial contender 
for the MLS Cup. Tickets are SI I at 
the gate. $ 16 for reserved and $20 for :, 
preferred seats Their season xunt 
through September For the best deal, 
the Galaxy recommends buying tick- 
ets in groups. The Galaxy family 
package runs $59. and includes tk:k- 
ets. drinks, food and souvenirs for 
four people 

Last but not least, the Los Angeles 
Avengers. L.A.'s Arena Football 
League representative, is a team tiiat 
also ofTers great deals for admiaiaa. 
For the true football buffs, the AFL 
combines high scoring with limited 
d e f cna e . and tickets run considerably 
less then the avcrafe $50 nosebleed 
seat for a National Football 



**l iaak It's a game for sporu fans 
as «dl as entertainment fans." said 
Valerie Lindeman-Shaw, vice presi- 
dent of sales and marketing for the 
Avengers "It's much quicker than an 
NFL game with a lot more scoring 
and more touchdowns. 

"Even if you're itot a fan of tlie 



I)aif> Brum Sparts 



Monday, lune 25, 2001 39 



AfiASE 

Frompaqe S4 

comes the I "KLA student Nccliiin 
()n the freeMhrnw line in then- 
lunior forward Ra> \oung The 
Brums arc up b\ maybe three points. 
and perhaps the most iiKonsistenl 
shtHUcr on the team needs \o sink lwt» 
tree throws 

And then I heard it It was the 
sound ot jaded I ( I., A fans, scared 
that another one v^ould slip awa\ to 
ol"S( 

■Ray VtHint!''()h. (expletive) Let's 
gel t>ut of here and heat the irall'ic 
hd'ore we bk>w this lead " 
Free thr»>w « I jjimkI 
'Did I just see what I think I saw'' 
eHluHever. he'll cho-" 
Free throw «»2 gtHtd 
What we all hud failed to reali/e 
4HS that V'lHing. as haphazard as his 
field goal shcH>iing ma\ have been, 
was almost autoniutic at the line He 
went on to dram 1 1 of 12 from the 
line, vault the Bruins to a titanic K5-76 
win. and nearK gave all ol us heart 
attacks ot'shiKk 

It wasn't the first time a I ICLA 
team ttxik years oft oti m\ life, and I 
can assure you it won't be the last 
But on that night. Young made believ- 
ers ol us all. and some time during 
your four. five. six. or - for yoa schol- 
ars out there seven years here at 
LICLA. you itxi will hopefully He a 
ck)fie bond to Brum sports 

Not that It's all that hard to do here 
in Westwotxi With 22 varsitv sp<»rts. 
workk:lass facilities and eiite athletes 
lo match, it comes as nt> surprise that 
in 1997 Spt»rls Illustrated named 
IK'LA the No I \ocV schtH>l in the 
aation 

And thev aren't thtisc stcreotypieal 
||.C Slater meatheadjixrks Thev are 
gktdent-athlcles Thev are student-ath- 
letes who voii will sii next to in clasit. 
They are siudeni-alhkrtcs who you 
will fight with tor the last croissant at 
Riebcr Dining Hall 

And mt>st ol all. they are studenl- 
iMetes who are successful. 

■ Brmn spt>rts teams have racked up 
a natK)n-leading 86 NCAA champi- 
onships - m the last 50 years. If 
UCLA were a country, it would have 
placed seventh in gold medals at the 
19% Olympics in Atlanta And con- 
stdering all of the trophies on display 
at the J'D Morgan Imercollegiate 
Adiletic Center. UCLA could proha- 
Wy purchase a country of its own 
from allot the mdtecMowa preciOMS 
metals. 

I could ramble on about legendary 
UCLA athletes like Jackie Robinson. 
Jackie-Joyner Kersee. Lisa 
Fernandez and Kireem Abdul- 
Jahhar. but my editors only let mc 
wntesomuch 

But seriously, kiok around You 
are attending one of the fmest univer- 
sities in the nation and have the 
opportunity to watch (and pkiy) 
sports in some of the finest venues 
college athletics has to offer 

Pauley Pavilion is a mecca of col- 
lege basketball, and John Wooden, 
who IS a frequent visitor during Brum 
basketball games, remains a god-like 
fipae on this campus Sure, football 
paaes may be 45 minutes away, but 
they're at the Rose Bowl, and if that 
1*1 ssem like a big deal nght now. 
; fsady lo walk in. turn around and 
: what win become 90.000 of yoar 

;fnends 

If you want to get m on the actK>n 
yourself, check out both the Wooden 
Center and intramural sports teams 
that range from friendly to intoxicat- 
ed to rivaling the dippers and Angels 
iasMI level 

Most of all. get ready for another 
fut-wrenching. stomadKummg. frus- 
■oflraai 

iraecon- 
laadDiok 
Clark I'd Kkc 10 add a fourth the 
UCLA spar 

Last year, the fi 
UK) No. 3 teams to start iK 




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WALK-ONS 

on a team that cuuld contend tor a 
natumal title." Hoshimiya said 

Hoshimiya tallied to Bniin soccer 
head coach Tcxid Saldana and worked 
out a transfer Similar to Dia/. he wa.s 
not guaranteed a roster spot But. 
Hoshimiya said. "It was kind of a 
given I would receive one since they 
got me to transfer ' 

Due to NCAA regulations. 
Hoshimiya had to redshirt last season 
even though he made the team At the 
same time, he had no scholarship 
money coming in Yet unlike Diaz in 
his first year at UCLA. HoshimqM 
practiced with his team 

Having survived last year. 
Hoshimiya will get to lace up his cleiili 
as a Brum this season 

Months removed from that April 
night in which he faced Prior. Dia? still 
looks hack at that game as one of the 
highlights of his career. 

While Priors fasthalls were regular- 
ly clocked between 91 and V4 miles per 
hour. Diaz dehvered his pitches at ■ 
much more leisurely pace Diaz's fasl- 
balls never topped V, 3 mph and his slid- 
er dipped into the 60s. 

Bui as the game progrcvsed. the 
Trojans found Diaz unhittable He hit 
his spots; forcing several ground outs 
and pop-ups He didn't give up a run 
for the rest of the game Ahhough he 
lost the game 2-0. he could take satis- 
faction in knowing that Pnor. the con- 
sensus No I player m the country, 
needed his best outing of the year to 
heat him 

When the game was over. Brum 
head coach Gary Adams couldn't help 
but smile, even though his team had 
moved closer to finding itsctt'out crf'tfae 
NCAA Tournament 

"That's what college baaehall is all 
lAioul." Adams said 'It's great to see a 
guy like Paul Diaz, a walk-on^ take on 
a guy like Prior and pitch so well." 



AGASE 

Frotn page WV 

then managed to lose to Cal and 
use. two teams that finished with a 
combined eight wins 

That winter, just when Steve Lavm 
looked like he was about to put on his 
lust glob of hair gel as UCLA head 
basketball coach, the team beat then- 
No I Stanford on their home floor 
for the .second year m a row. then pro- 
ceeded to lose to hapless Washington 
to close out the season 

Like i said, it's going to be a 
bumpy adventure But that's what 
keeps you coming back knowing 
that occasionally, often when least 
expected, things smooth out and a 
team to which you become vitally 
connected hangs up another champi- 
onship banner. 

Welcome to liCLA Enjoy the 
ride. 

AgH« doesn't live m the dorms any- 
mon and reaHy misses brunch. If you 
have Premier Plan arKi vvould like to 
swipe him in one ^weekend, e-mail him 
at agase#ucla.edu. 



nCKETS 

From page IS 

sport, there ace. video clips, music 
clips and a great dance team," 
Lindeman-Shaw added "It's a lot of 
entertainment ' 

Avenger tickets start at S9 and run 
upward of S45 A season ticket for all 
seven Staples Center home games 
can be purchased for as little as 
S52 50 The Avengers are also con- 
sidering offering student discouiNs 
for the 2000-2001 seuon 

"On a college budget. SS2 50 for 
seven games is a fr«at dtai," 
Lindenuin-Shaw Hid. 

The scnitinizmg sports fan wilt 
notice that there are quite a few | 
deals availabk in L.A. 






Daily Brum Spw te 



M(MKia\. .Iun<- 25. 2(Nl| 41 



PERIMETER 

From page IS 

taid. 

Most runners do not aeoM con- 
c-emed either / 

Til worr> abtnit n when Im old and 
crippled I'd rather be in shape now. 
said second-year engmecrint! student 
Joseph C(K' 

"I don't worr> ab«)ui my knees 
because I don t need them." said 
women's tennis head coach Stella 
Sampras 

Her players, however, need their 
knees. st> she keeps them i>n the track 
where she can alst) keep an eye on them 
so they don't slack (>n 

.■■()n the perimeter they breatlte *Bf» 
much smi>g." added women's tennis 
auMStant coach Jon Reeves 

Car exhaust and joint ussues aside. 
man> people prefer the perimeter \o 
the track because ii is more scenic 
Perhaps Sampras' brother. (ea^M ttOR 
Pete S;impra>. put.s It best 

"Runninp m circkrs is boring." he 
said. 

"Ihi track is monotomnis," agreed 
second-year undeclared student Mvlcs 
Regdc I sec a ton ol people, on the 
perimeter .Anytime you go. y<»u'll 
always find another runner, even at 
midnight ' 

So whether you arc kHtking for com- 
pany or just trying to keep little sister s 
fat jokes at bay. the perimeter might be 
for you 

VENKE 

From page 34 

them will lake all of the shots " 

A thing that makes Venice Beach sv 
popular tor onkMikers is the fact that 
watching is completelv acc-eptablc. m 
lacl. It IS a regaiar Icaiurc i»l the p*ipii- 
lar beach s setting 

Seating is set up all alon^ the beacli 
lor visitors t(> watch the athletic staple 
of their cht>ice One can ch»H>se lt> 
view a pick-up basketball game, watch 
the skaters do their tricks ai the skate 
park, or simpiv stare at the tlexmi: 
bcxlybuilders at Musele Keaeh all are 
on public display 

"Whether yt)u re working mit or 
just strolling b\ Venice Beach is lust 
one big part\ lor everyone" Darkes 
said People like to watch people, and 
It's up to yiHi whether you're one ol 
the people doing the watching or one 
ol the people being watched 

If you're still not satisfied, the 
beach caters to other sp«>rting inter- 
ests, including beach volleyball courts, 
a smashball court and a beach-long 
bike trail frequented b> bicyclists. 
rolk:r hiaders and skaters alike 

It that still doesn't do the trick 
Venici Beach oflcrs one ol the most 
ecccp . ic beach cultures on the 
Cai' trnia coast Its outer strip is lined 
willi shops, musicians, psychics mav 
sage therapists and plenl> ol other 
unique characters 

You name the sport, and Vcnicx" 
Beach has it 



WOODEN 

From page 3S 

L..\ Illness because Wtniden is s*) 
popular" said mechanical engineer- 
ing student Matt Vlasado "The 
expanNH>n ol the weight riHtm and the 
ItKker iacihties will bring everyone 
back aiHl make >^«H)den ihe perleci 
place to wi>rk out ' 

During the ct>nsiruction period, 
the John WiHxlen ( enter w ill he mak- 
ing many coneessums ,m> sunieniN are 
not aflected b\ the expansion cOort 
" We re going to have as nian\ activi- 
ties and features that we've always* 
hati but with less r(H>m to do it." Nuid 
W(H>den Center manager Dennis 
koehne "Our hours will be e'xpanded 
to make up for an\ inconveniences 
caused h\ e(»nsiruction We want to 
make sure that inside the Wooden 
Center, the students won't even know 
that con.'itructuNi is going on" 





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UCLA'S 

VBIONPUUii 
AND STUDENTS 
EYE-IMED PUMH 




FREE CONTACT 
J.ENS SOLUTIOM 

You JUST NEED 
TO STOP IN 



fmmn,ml «r»*t-. f.1. Ik, • 1 f « ..laimMiif 



The difference ts HIGH QUALITY service 



Close to campus in Westwood Village 

Across from Jerrv s Farnous Deli 



42 



Daily Bruin 




\l()ii(ld\ liinr 1!.") 2(t(il 



I'Vhl^l^iil^irVl 



Campus Happenings 
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■ for Rent 
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ffousing Mae4ad 

Room far Nalp 

Room far Rent 

Roommaies - Prfwaie Room 

Rao mn tales - Sh a red Room 

vacation Rentals 



index 



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1 IH Kerckhdff Hull 
SOH \A<e!Slwo<Kl Pla/ii 
Los Angeles f'A 90U2* 



E Mail diissilierlSifi media iiclfi edu 
yA/eb http 'wwvA/ claiiytxuifi iiclii edu 



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at 1 2 noon 
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lor variable rate infornmtion 



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accept Visa. MasterCaid. and 
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J 



' «. 



woriung days tof mail payments 



I Mon Thu y OUani 3 OOfKTi 
j Fri 9afTi 2 3Upm 

v_ . _ _ _^ _^ > 

Th.; AiSut ^ CimiMiumcJIiom Doan] iiiHv juppons me unnarsty ol 
ikrnii'«>inij mh, iir mpiv ItMi ttMty jn- imiKNi lo pi»(ion& cjpaM 
«Ov«*ttvnnf*H'. '(;pre%«nlen d Ih**. tism Any person beligwii^ Itlal m 

Dwv Bnaii MBKncknol) n^u 10H Weslwgud PW4 ^os AngMn CA 90024 fy mmlmttm «■» tOuwng OitummjiKvi protiwins cai n» UCt* Hmanig OSic» a O10l»7&-4??1 
47s.ti«-i Ci«H*«) MS aao anwiK nn-mc ai nnp "wmrw dmylsnjn urn adu Wto iimii an a » » n Si il as * . miiptniin i iy Mrwct lor am temm i »m » iw ^iwwWB Tlw O 
^ ■n-.t^hoT' lotk Minw lypoyiBliK:!! «f rors «w noi iiypig lo. .eiunds Fo any n/tund. m« Daly Brum riwrtnil Daoaftinrm must Da iiuWuU ol an mm oi mr hrsi day m pubkcann 



* Stan youi ad with the 
merciiarKtwe you are seMmg 
This mattes it eeater (or readers 10 
qiNCkly scan the ads and locale 
voiii Items 

■ Always include the pnce a( youi 
Item Many dassiiied readers 
sirnpiy do not respond to ads 
withotii prices 

■ AvoKl atjbrevtations- -rnaite youi 
ad easy tor readers to urKter starid 

• Plaoe yourself iri tr>e reader s 
position aak what you would hke 
to tuiow about the rnerchandisc 
and mckide that in ttie ad Inckidt' 
such mtoimation as tirand rionies 
cotors and othei specakc 
descriptions 



■'taatsy an i 



t Hat t&Mjc Tiui^i;\j i 



111 icxtt* adua nu ai n a m aladi pnaanl pwioi u ol 
■>u' itM- ASUCI> Comnwicainm flaaid has 
lonOnriii m i a a u ii stakMJ Iwan mouM i;u»>iwiMiw,an 



m a 
•ly ol «» nw w a ui n naad or w«e 
lania ai aMlaiB lo Ika AaaMM DmcMir 
can iMa MMalaSt Far Nayang (Mca a (3 1 01 
■ly Bnan s laiponaMi tarStalnta 
by noon 




1100 

Campus Happenings 



1100 

Campus Happenings 



y JKtdilaliMt (Hfh^eai a 



CnwSPiaarMaa 

Ourinq these two days you If learn ta 
-QuMt yotir mind <nd rvija you body • 



-Find imm smposr In ll^ 
-Dnvisp tfw ^tiitK.<9^ you «mM to kaar 
-li m y a tf nwdkJtior into )ioiir My 
actMlin 



ANNUAUQUARTERLY 

1(V1-9n 1CV1-12/3 

MEMBERSHIP 

ballroom@ucla.edu 

40/150-F HOURS OF 

FREE DANCELESSONS 

SWING-SALSA-TANGO 

SAVE 25% 

POSTMARKED 

BY SEPT. 1ST 

SPACE IS LIMITED 

Mail to BDC/IFDC 914 Westwoofl Blvd •i^^ 
t A CA 90024 LEARN SWING SALSA 
TANGO WALTZ CHACHALINDVMOP* 
NEW LINE DANCES trom Latin America 
&Around-ttie-Woric) IMondays 7 iipm 
OUCLA Acherman StudentUnion-Building 
2ndFloorLounge-24i4 The Ballroom 
Oarx:e ClutAlntemationai Fofh Dance Club 
at UCLA Email bsHroomSucla edu or Uni 
versitvDarKeClut>sausa net 310 2843636 
Pre* Qiub i-shin lor first 100 Annual Mem- 
tiers Additional Annual M'tmber t>erw(its in 
elude Free Ice Cream Socials all 5 Mondays 
n-OctoOer(9 tipmi Free S«nng,'Salsa Par 
lies Free Club Semi-Formals & nurT>eroui 
field inps including additional lessons i/2 
pnce at participating local darKe studios eli 
git)iiitv for the BDC/IFDC Pertorming Dance 
GrouprMondays6 15 7pm) Details at 
www studentgroups uda edu/t>aiiroomdance 
A www geocities com/SwingSalsa Tango 
24l^ Romantic Dance Lesson Senes t>egins 
Monday October 1st-Eipenence ff>e Joy of 
Dancing Where Great Romances Begin 
EVERYONE WELCOME' 

BIG DANCE 

14TH ANNUAL 

NEW STUDENT 

WELCOME OCT.22 

SALSA LESSONS 9% 

FREE CELEBRATION 09PM •AGB (Ack 
erman Grand Ballroom 2rxl floor) First 1000 
Participants will be admined See inspiration 
ai Salsa/Merengue Pertorming DarKe 
Groups Questions call 310 284 3636 
www studentgroups ucia edu/ballroom 
dance/cetebrotion mmi battroomAucia edu 



s 



'^-ep of' chd'QP 



aaatf flbr *asffr s^ dbl^ iMif 

to diTi to 4 pm Sdturiiay dnd Sunday 

July 14 and I") 

Viewpoint Conferpttcf Roofi. 
AckerTTiar Jmor. Lfvel A, JCLA 

IW> •fW<f <all V W ■<« '■•wMdj C^ilo ■rrimr 
•^*t^^m^ Sfc» K»» ' U « H «»« Iw^ fl u M» :' 

•rlil<l ■» m wiii w •« »'tmmt0mt^^M9 9mm 
1** S- 'Hi«**wfl|p*»«i«.C«»tt»cHt^ *"«**•■ 




Alcoholics Anonymous 





EXPERIENCE 50^ YEAR 

TRADITION AT UCLA 

SALSA LESSONS dIO 

LEARN FAMOUS LINE/ROMANTIC 
PARTNER DANCES Mondays 9- iipm First 
meeting October isi OLXDLA Kerclihotf Hall 
Grand Salon Regular mreekly meeting room 
OUCLAAckemwn ^2414 Learn cool Swing 
Moves 09 4Spm Salsa 'Cuban Casino 
Rueda' Lessons lO-iipm En|oy dancing to 
music from Bra2ii-Gra«ce-Me>ico-Ffarx» 
Turkey Egypt -Italy-Bulgaria -Spain-Israel 
Morocco-Armenia-lreland-YemervLat>anon 
Europe - NorthAmenca - Asia Africa South 
Amenca THE WORLD"*' International FoNi 
Dance Club 310-284 3636 Cuttursl Even 
ings Latin 10/22 Qraati/Armenwn in No 
vember Persian-Arabic-Afncan-lsraeli Dates 
TBA UniversityDanceClubstfusa net Co 
sponsorshiD of ottier EtTinic/Cultural Student 
Organizations/Campus Departments Wei 
-ime""'" www studentgroups uda aduAMll 
roomdance/IFDC html Annual BDC/IFDC 
Merribers en|oy 150 hours ol free dance 
Wessons annually 

JOIN THE 

PERFORMIHG 

DANCE GROUP 

danceusa 9 usa.net 

Deinonstrate fun dartcss •onAoll-campus 
cultural events tWss fc ly raheafsats Oct-Jan 
Mondays 6 l5-7pm •UCLA Acfcerman 
Union room 2414 First meeting October 1st 
www studentgroups ucia edu/ballroom 
dance/IFOCPDG html CaM 310-284 3636 or 
email UniversityOanceClubS^usa net An 
nuai BOC/tFDC mambershv) required 

SUMMER 2001 

LEARN 

SWING-SALSA-TANGO 

A FUN LINE DANCES 

teUroom O ucla.edu 



1200 

CnrTinus Orcinnizii'i '^'-^ 



JANE AUSTEN 

VICTORIAN-RAGTIME 

VIENNESE WALTZ 

VICTORY SWING 

DANCES 

EXPERIENCE HISTORY 

Annual Southern Calitomta Autumn Ball 
Saturday. October 13th 7 30- m idnig h t Learn 
simple-eiegant ballroom dances of the early 
I9iricentury Lessons lOam/Tpm Tea Time . 
4pm Costumes welcoma/not raqwrad Din- 
ner inctudad For mtormation caa:2l3-3e4 
6622 Details at wrww regencyfnends org 
40th SOI Victorian Grand Costume BaH No 
vember 24th Contact laha^pacbell net 
eigJ92 34S4 UniversityOance 

ClubsOusa net Caipookng avaiiabte. call 
BOG 310 284 3636 284 3638 For upcoming 
htstoncal costume dances see www student 
groups uclaedu/baliroomdance/historicai 
dances, html 



1800 

Misceliaiieous 



ON CAMPUS BANKING 

Vour on-campus & on-line firtancial services 
source for students faculty A staff Visit us at 
Acherman A-level on-line at www ucu org or 
call 310-477-6628 



2200 

Research Subjects 



PESEARCH STUDY 



Research Institute needs heatttiy 

fnen, ages 21 -45. tor a 5 week study 

of alcoliol and an investigational drug 

Must be avalit)le tor tfiree 

tratntng/basettne visits (3-4 ttour; 

eacti) and tour weekty treatment/test 

days (7-t- hours each) Testing 

includes cotnputerized tasks of 

reaction time and dnvmg skills 

EvnSeooinralurty 
CilSunnloMeily«i«NMy 
310/390-8463 M-F 9w»-5|»n 



1300 




I last and have normal 
•) wM tie mviteO to 
tmaaanali c sludy 't 
diabetes Subfacts «i« be paid S 90 
lor partKipalion. 



•^ rtrripiis R»' 



DO YOU LOVE? 
ISRAEU DANCE 

I A DANCE/SOCIAL EVENTS 7 NIGHTS A 
WEEK www geocities com/israelidance 
Email israeliDancetf yahoo com Holiday 
dance camps and ansnd dance 
in Braiil (December) Msmco 
(Man:ft). New Vbrti (Apnl). Boaion^^anadi « 
Israel (July) Ask about the Isfaati Dance 
Peftormif^g Group 




Egg Donors Needed 

Healthy iemales ages 19-28 
wishir>g to help in^ile couples. 

S'i.nno 
t Call MMNA (818) 832 1494 4 



2200 

Rfst.'itrcli SiJt))e(:ts 



2200 

Researc h Subject*. 



I Dance CMVIR)C at UCLA Mor 
days 7 10pm June 2S-Aug 27 tfUCLA 
Acherman Union S2408 310-284-3636 

inm.mttmtfvtttAtat.mtJttttmamtmKm 
www.gaocNMscam/SwingSataaliMtgo 
Space • iMMd tor Fan Qir Svit«i today* 






CMidoffl Study 




E«m $1 40 for partldpattng 

Couples tnuft be 

▼ AtH8-45 ▼ in a sMile icMtomMp witti or>e pwtfNT 

V wmni to npon on 8 oondom uses 

* Ci»»wi \am of BMh Control Wh. WO. Norplem. Depo. or 



800-521-5211 

KOIg 



DmK Brtiii) Classified 



\«ornb\. Juiir if). 2(KH 45 



2300 

Sperm / tgcj Donors 



2 3 00 



2300 

Spent) ' Egg Dortors 



2300 

Sperm / Egg Donors 



Special Egg Donor Needed 



■ii ;" ■'■ .!. -v. 



Preferred Donor will meet the following criteria: i 

•Height Approx. 5'9'' or Taller -S-A.!. Score around 1300 

or High A.C.T. •Caucasian 'College Student or 
Graduate Student Under 30 'No Genetic Medical Issues 




Compensation 




Paid to you and/or the charity of your choice. 
All related expenses will be paid in addition to 

your compensation. 

(Extra compensation available for someone who might be especially 
gifted in athletics, science/mathematics or music.) 



For more information or to obtain aiLappIication please 
contact Michelle at the Law Office of Greg L Eriksen 

(800) 808-5838 
or email E^|>onorInfo@aol.com. 



S900 

Financial Aid 



STUDENT LOANS 

Get you' SiattoitJ Loar, ffon- UiivcfSilv C'eO 
It Union (Lender Ccxh? 832123| We if or 
^an^i> at Ac(»eimHri A lever m 0.-47^ -«62H 
Lucuorg 



6000 

Insurance 



CycieTime ,r«iur8n;e Se^ . 



• Motufuyute ♦ Woiu. b«_uv>itr' • Moped « 



■ 
■ 



t' '• LESS i»<*N • '^ 'M'**-* 
No KiOOirvg' Cad 'o' a "ise quote' 

(310) 275^734 

[.•':»**"•»« •i»to« m.>tinu*fi. $n; Ot 
Iv Out' tu^ tr^HufjM^*^ t*MtT-r\«fc»' 




/lllstate. 



MMWini 
(3 10) 3 1 2-0202 

I :'« ) \A/**stv»^<>< >« 1 HiA/' 1 
(;-■ I iiu . s- . • <• Wii?,i\ic<.) 



6100 

Computer/ Interne*! 



$11.99/MONTH 

UIV4LIMITED INTtH'.E ' A e SS '>■ '■ • 
$11 99/fnontn No Aos Nt Busy Stgrwis 
CaH 81B-7t»2-3467 o' visit wmm Uuiiaognost 
ing.cofn 



61 SO 

Foreign Lanquaqe 



wfmmitflk 



*lliis ad is being placed for a particular client and is not soliciting eggs for a donor bank. 



Translations 
All Languages! 

DIPLOWAb THA\bv MlPlb U: 

Certification & Notarization 

Tel (310(260-7700 

Fax (31 0» 260-7705 

Visit our Website: 

worde Kpress.net 



6300 

Leqai Advice/ Attorneys 



♦BANKRUPTCY* 

G€T OUT Of OeBI NOW- Ffef Cinvult» 
tior Expo'ienoed attrn'ie^ ^e<^.■>(^1rt^•l 
tees iCrieryte M Wtiite UClAt^ »6' 8ni' 
420 9996 PicoOvertana Wl A 



Pay your tuition 
with eggs. 



II y«i(j re a wnnian between l^ 

and ^^. you can earn moncx easi 

ty. anon ymiHj sly Donale youi 

eujis to .in tnleniK- couple 

S'i.tMII) .iihI up. dcpendin}! on 

vou education .inJ olhci quaiili 

c;un»nN Call Toda\ 

Th£ Center for Egg Options 
310/S46 6786 




transportation 



IdUU-DDUU 



4900 



S300 

Scooter / Cycle Repair 



■ MoiorcycM • Motor Scoot*' • Motwfl ■ 
g Saiw • ilHMira • ln«ur«nc« ^ 

■• EXCHMMC AD MM MK nCN-U^i 

■ nC^AM, OR iniltCHASE DtSCOUNT. ■ 

• (310)275r6734 • 

■ 1632 S U Cianagi BMl Su Btoda Souir al P<co ■ 



sunnnnerbruin 



M C ^ ~ '^ 



5700 

Travel Tickets 



6600 

Personal Services 



2600 

Warttrc' 



RECEP. WANTED 

BH CO rteavy phones gei oBice duties 
FuH-lime Cell 310-286 3960 



<97n OATSUN 7mZ S^MeO deewc Mvei 
wt)urgundy mnfiar inleno' Excellent condi 
linn engine rebuiH Alpine slef«<> S5000 
Sti-veS^SZei-OMi 



1994VWJETTA 

While t-nrnii rriHnuei sunroot KC rnj* 
tires new brakes, great condition 
it3 000mi »«M(Vabo CaM Aoben 31 0-403 
-401 or yMfoOVhotmaii com <mari to ym- 
rot) (WMSi . oovn > 





AQUA TRAVEL HC 



WORLD WIDE LOWEST AIRF ARES 

Lowest Domestic and 

International Airfares 

Tour Packages 

Euroilposs 

Hotel Accommodations 

Cor Rentals 

•Asta*Airica*Austroha'Etjrope'Soun^ 
Amefico'lrxlia'3arx)(3a*Mexico'Ha\waic 



PHONE r3iq)33d«)25 



:Jt .:& AtMtfs Ji i 



.1^* 




load. «v«is unfit truon^fn 

^ri^r\it\\ 7 30 «<n j» Hii"\«m^ S>»ncr Cmv 

H'; N Ht||liljnrf *wr ictiwvnj M»ht»»> 

'ini MS 8?<»' 



BEAR S RESEARCH. 
WRITING & EDITING I ^ 



ShUfO' B».»' Pti U 1.^1111 4 ■•o.n, 



advertise 




in cias:.ifie(l disc 



206.3060 



:la«;«;ifipcl'^ 
2221 



Display 
.'06 306( 



U \l(mda\ lum- 2'>. HHW 



I)ail\ Brum CUssifit^ 



5680 

Travel Destinations 



5680 

Travel Destinations 



STUDENT TRAVEL 



ffimiQDYiSaiaMi^ 




310.UGU.Hy tr iSI795 




TRAVEL 



6200 



6200 



,. .,!.., s,.,, 



CoupxDn Value $ I OO 

Ir * li jrJir trj It i of fiV p-blp;ir f>ir ig or Mompkii 9l*^Hr U'r ic^ 
M-i<^ tjf' I i<.pd for ^ K^ (i<:»r itdl ^.ervicc*^ riPpfiPd.. 



r 



Dr. 




Dental Office 



Cosmetic Sk General Dentistry 

1 092 ] Wilsh.re Blvd #505 
Westwood, CA 90024 ^ 
310-824-0055 
vy^ww WestLADentist com 



"^ 



summe'-bruin 

e V [ K Y MONDAY 



To advertise call 

Display 
(310)825-2161 

On-Campus 
(310)206-7562 

Classified Line 
(310)825-2221 



6700 

Professional Services 



Since '970 PROFESSIONAL WRIT 
ING'EDITING Pape's reports statistics 't 
..evKs proposals siiidies theses clissen<i 
■' ns yraduale application essays Any 
-ivip requirentenl 323-87lt3r»n 




Classified'- 
825-222 



7000 

Tutoring Ottered 



MATH TUTOR 

1 tutor SAT mat^ Pre AlgabfB. Algabra i ana 

2 Geometry Tngonomelry. and beginning 
Calculus- UCLA Student rnath-relaled 
ma|or Five years expenence tulonng matt> 
and two years teaching experience 
S2S/tK)ur at my home S30/twur ai yours Caii 
toi more inloimation Stephanie 3 10- 702- 
6455 

TOEFL PREP/ACTING 

Free advanced ESL instruclion M TH Fro«n 
I GAM Stoner Park 1B35 Sidner Ave In 
small gym above suvimming pool 

WRTTING TUTOR 

KIND AND PATIENT Slanlord graduate 
Help vvith tt>e English language— lor stud 
ents ol all ag««/levels 310-440-3118 



7100 

Tulontu) Wanted 



ENGLISH AND 
MATH TUTOR 

For 9th grader 3hours/'day M-F 
SlOOWmonlh 323 732-5957 



TEACH THE SATs 



Need energetic people with 

High SAT scores to prep 
students 1 -on- 1 or in classes. 
All regions $15-$2S/hr Flex 
hours Car needed Call Tom 

310-448-1744 
^-^-w.tutoriobs.com 



rJTTTTT 





— employment 

7400-8300 



7S00 

Career Opportunities 



BARTENDERS 



• 2 «Mak mntna 4 Jab 

Wee— U Hl mSk0aat 

• ITS iiM a iat> -It I a MMTV« 



SCMOl ^ 



. » . t.a* . - r\./ii X X < t . 1 ■ »'* , 

I i.i(i< »i I. lit >.irt< >t »i I 



7600 

Child Care Ottered 



PROFESSIONAL 
NANNIES 



Live m and live out posiiions avail 
iMa MuM have 3years expenence and be 
CPn cerMied 3iO-22»-S221 

THE BABYSITTERS 
CLUB 

Provides on-caii sttier service to parents 
Days evenmgs and wreehends 310-226 
2900 

THE STORK STOPS 
HERE 

Provides baby nurses Ooulas and more lo 
•amtiies ol na««botns 310-286 2845 



7500 

Career Opportunities 



7700 

Child Care Wanted 



CANTONESE SPEAKING BABYSnTER is 
needed in Westwood -B-5 30 $20O/«4i 310- 
470-7594 



OMLOCARE WANTED Must Drive 
up daugMar trom school Daytime ; 
Females orny PocsMe iive-in 310-271 
8066 

CHILDCARE^>RIVER 

Pick up Ironi camp supervise piay lor2boys 
ages 9&13 T.W.F 3-«pm rnaaitHa atfMon- 
ai hours English ipaaliing Oian car wAn- 
surance Close to UCLA 310-470-20*7 

Dnmng babysitter lor Sy/o girl Pick-up from 
school 10 home near Westwood MWF 8AM 
10AM $9mr 310-474-28S0 or 310-449- 
726 ^ 

GREAT SUMMER JOB 

Babysitter tor two boys, age 749 15-20 
hours/week Stan immedntely ExcoHom sal- 
ary Home in Laurel Canyon Must have car 
irtsurance arxi pertea dnvmg record 310- 
842-5346 



7800 

Help Wanted 



A FUN SUMMER JOB 

S12 $2SMR.Cast >y PT Gay artist 

seeks loMlf elaaf Tiale urxler 22 lor 

figure rrtodeltng e|L inexperienced pre- 
ferred Oanny«ei0>9eo 1666 

JiWiALlOVER 

NEEDED to help care for numerous animals 
10 private twme Well cared lor flexible 
hours $13/hour (nogoliable) 818-763-0470 



7800 

Help Wanted 



CARBS AWAY 

PREMIERE FAT BURNING cart) reducing 
laas product Eapananoa rapid m- 
J'daah ano lapio wnQni loas vMMir.to- 
taNyorganc fraeMe com 

CAREGIVER WANTED 

For '. 3-yaar-old boy with down syndrome lor 
momh ol July Education or special 
Hon maior prelerred 310-271- 



CHILDREN'S STORE 

HELP WANTED Near WaMMa pawMan 
P/T $8rt>r 310-204 1896 

CLERK/RECEPTIONIST 

t5-20hrvwk Computer illiterale and organ- 
ized $9/hr Brentwood law ofhce 310-820- 
7900 



F/T OFFICE ASSISTANT 

Wanted Work in Weslwooo meOkal office 
Must De prolicient in MS Word and have en 
cellent orgaruzational skills $8/hr to start 
Fax 310-657 7716 



ANYONE CAN DO THIS Work around your 
school schedule $500 $i500/month Part 
lime 818-751 7961 



BANKING 



Or Hie drawing models waMad by photogra 
phei Call Peter at 310 558-4221 

FILE CLERKASSISTANT 20hr/week Law 
firm in Century City Must have one-year 
commitmertt Filing/laxing^copyiri(^o(her du- 
ties WiNing to pay SlO/hr. Fax Resume 
310-553-5037 



wiM do 



PT teller/nevn accounts positions at Univers 
ity Credit Umon EacaNent pay hours & envi 
ronment Some ai^xanence prelerred Apply 
at 150C S Sepuiveda Blvd LA 90025 Fax 
resume 310-477 2566 oi on web 
www ucu org/|Obs htm 

CAFE/BRENTWOOD 
GOOD$$ 

FlaidMB hours Great atrTx>spt>ara #H^. 
erwrgelic Iriendiy people wanted 
PT/FT/Weekend positions availatMe for 
mgmt counter and bansta positions 12081 
Wilshire Blvd. Brentwood Apply today 



GET INTO LUCRATIVE busmaas ol 
ing< WeH-reapected photographer 
your pontolKi artd lirtd you |ob Not 
sanly nodHy 310-478-4734 

GUARDIAN ANGELS « now hghtmg noise' 
Activisis iiimiBiil s naadart Mao secretary 
Voiunieer Good cauae PoaalblB luture pay 
310-478-4734 

HOTEL DESK CLERK 

Hoiei desk clerk- P/T momrngs Westwood 
Vriiage Hotel 310-208-3945 

ncon document 
servk:es 

New oNice in Century City Ptviiocapy lagM 
documents can Tamara for an inMr«w» at 

213-489 1700 



Don't call your parents 
for extra cash. 

Call us. 



If you're male, in college or 
have a college degree, and 
would like a flexible job 
wtiere you can earn up to 
S600 per montti. call for 
details on our anonymous 
sperm donor program. 
You'll receive free 
compret^ensive health 
screening Plus you can 
help infertile couples 
realize their dream of 
becoming parents. So if 
you're looking for a great 
job and little extra cash, 
call us first. 




310-824-9941 

or e-mail us at 
donorsOcryobank . com 



7500 

Uiire'tT Oppcirtijnilies 



7500 

.art'ff Oppdrtiinities 



Advertising Opportunities 

The .Jewish .lournal's advertising sales 
department is expanding. We are looking to fill a 
\ariet>' of positions from experienced Account 
Executives to enfry level Sales Associates. Strong 
interpersonal skills required. Knowledge of the 
.Jewish Communit> a plus 

ATTM: 




Career Opportunities 

The Jewish Journal is expanding. 
We need a full time administrative 
assistant. Strong interpersonal skills 
required. Knowledge of Jewish 
Community is a plus. 

Please fax reswme: 213/36»>16M 
Attn: General Manager 
NO PHONE CALLS 



l>ail\ Kriiiii ClasNified 



\)<MI«L 



iiiii*> 



2fM»l 4.'. 



7800 

Help Ul.»ntf ri 



7800 



7800 

M**tp VUdnied 



We have j f/TTJ/TJCTpositions available. 

^^CLAfund 

Looking for ^ 

flexible hounr 

$9.76 

Mils BONUS 




•Convenient Scheduling 
(Mon -Fri evetuiigs & Sat. Sun.) 
*Build Your Resume 
"Speak Directly to Alumni 
*• We are an equal opjMHtunttv eniplover 



Call Sandin for Appoinimeni *■ 

310-794-0277 h 



1083GaylevAve.4th 
email callcenter@support.ucla.edu 



m • 




Get the Facts on 



In observance of HIV testing weei(, the Pedro 
Zomoro Youth HIV Program, in conjunction wilh 
the Ashe Center, will be offering FREE, anonymous, 
orol HIV testring. To get tested or gother more 
informotion, visit their booth in front of the Ashe 
Center (on Westwood Plaza) on Thursday, 28 June, 
frwn 11 00 am to 2:00 pm. 

FIff t-^ilrts FfEE condoms ond more. 



mw 



INDONESIAN 
TRANSLATORS 



tl" Strong experience re 
quMWl 3MMK-8811X1015 or amail micni 
iDaiianguaoa.com 



LEADERS WANTED 

SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEUR . seeks 
Mte-mmded big Itonkers* INT'L opp 323 964 
5702 

LEASING ASST AND 



Are you a model 



LiM>kmg tor all iype% 

mnlc/temalc nvxlels/actan 

Wi- jUii have Hlus MK 6i. Chiltlmi div 

I "I ptini A mm-unMin wiMinu-rculs 



For Real Estate Co Word and Excel e« 
paMNM raqd Will assist me President 
OM oMi. stK>w vacancies typing, tiling 
I reports, set appoimments local er 
FuH time ♦benetns B1B-907-0800 
OKI 306 or tax resume 818-907.0787 

LOOK CLOSELY 

Pr\ WORK FT PAY Bright students wanted 
Culver City office Generous salary plus 
commission Good phone voice Gra- 
ham 310-837 OSOSext 174 

MILLIONAIRE MNOED? 

Entreprfineuf seeks M»o pan-time indivtrluais 
10 malie SiM7 m the naxt two wreaks Urn 
t- 



%<• Ksli-nctuc Vrii-vv<n 

Mm S<«wi^ chtMmi ill i$fs uas 

■UR. V> Hln^ I miimrfci^. \laiia)^nrv 

litr iKT-o'itil iiilfn H-ii ^iill i/iMi 

310.659.7000 




SWM MSTRiiCTORS 

At diant how s $20-$24/hr Strong 



8^00 



arierKe with smaH children 
Summar ampioyment Can John 8i8 78' 
7676 ext 1 



8000 

It.TIlStlipS 



GAY-FRIENDLY INTERNS NEEDED tor na 
tionaKy distributed gay mens iilestyie and 
eniertainrrtem magajnne iOhrs/»»»i unpaid 
Fax resume 323-467-8300 



MUSIC ROYALTY 
AUDITOR 

CandNtole «mII be responsOle lor performing 
rTMMK royalty audits including audits oi 
record companies ttaMalf ol recording adists 
arKi audits ol music publishers on tMhalt 
A BS in accounlir>g o' linarx;e 's pre 
Previous expenence worfcing wii^ 
foyaities Tv^ilm participation aapewance 
or a CPA CetMicate is a plus Excellent com 
murxcaiion skiHs »nO prohciency with Excel 
Word and Access needed Compensation 
commensurate iMth eapanerMre and pedor 
mance Piaaae appty sMh raautws and cove' 
letter to'i 



8300 

jnteer 



NOW HtntNG ADULT MODELS AND DANC 
ERS SSO(Vd«yup FuN-time/Pan-time No 
EKpenence Necessary 310-663-7308 

OFFICE MANAGER entry level win trair 
tun-lime M-F 9-6. 10 mmutes Irom UCLA 
Computer knowM|a fa^Mfad Salary/ber>e 
Ms 310-476-420S 



\ okuilcc'is .NcLtkci 

S(M-iHl \<Hir Stirninfr \v( >rkit»^ 

with kuts ,i>»<s t> IM TImH<»ss 

.1111 1 < .irK < liil) ol \<M)i< »• !)»•(•( K 

\ < M 1 to ,»ssisi will \ rill I in >v;rHi 1 1 

ctn-.is .hhI iifld tri|>s TIk 
sitiuiiM'f iTovirrtiii rijiiH 7_' 

'III Vt<H)<lH\ hri<l.»\ H<IMI 

ii|iiii We .ir<- l»K rtK'd .11 

I.IIK <>ll1 itlHl W'IMl (• 

» .III »l(>- t«a»-447T \'irmi)i.i 

I'M JJMi (If flerri- KM J tKi loi 

,_ in. <\- ml' iniMlii Ml 



1-MMUTE TO UCLA 

1 Ddrm turnistie clean security entrance 
large closets laundry room pool lyr lease 
$1200/mo 310-824 1830 

1380 VETERAN -2bdrm.2btti $1S96 Park 
view roottop pool/|acu/Zi intercom entry 
gated parking laundry all appliances Move 
in ASAP Cats considered '310-477-5106 • 

5MI EAST UCLA BACHELOR $S85/month 
2bed/ibalh $i200/mDnlh Large arxl bngnt 
upper Evenings 310-858-7760 

BEL AIR ibdrm pool parking great iuc<<tio' 
$675 310 395-RENT www weslsiderer 
tals com 

BEVERLY HILLS private room large closets" 
garage $550 www westsiderentais-com 
310 395-RENT 

BEVERLY HILLS 2bdnns comer unii hard 
wood tloors large kitchen $1295 310 395 
RENT www weslsiderentals com 

BEVERLY HILLS Apartment hardwood 
llrmrs elegant building utilities included 
$850 310 395-RENT www westsideren 
tals com 



NTWOOD 



1/2 time (morrwigs) 2RN at VA Medical Can 
ter West LA ProHciant in Word and Excel 
$ii/hour Some benatlls Fax resume to: Su 
san Orrange 310-208-4404 

STUDENT ASSISTANT 99 TSrtir WDili Mu 
dy-aUpMa Qanaral oWca duliaa/Ma«t in re 
■ aar c h (eaanfNMa aniiy) 0»aai apportum 
ty to laafn bualnaas la aaa i ch DetaiK 
can 310-794-0422 



LiassiTieas 
R?5-22?i 




NORTH OF WILSHIRE spacious 
3bdrm/2bth upper w tMicony New d'Sf- 
wastiei retngeraior stove etc Ouiei 8unii 
bidg w garden sundcxk $2295 ti92' 
Gostier Ave «4 Open Sunday or by a|)pi 
310-571 0293 

BRENTWOOD ADJ. 

2bdrrTV2bl^ $1590 Lease to two No prits 
Nea' Wiishire/Bundy Bright uppei 123() 
McClellan Dr 310-826-8461 

BRENTWOOD townhouse tiardwrood floors 
a/c liraplace $ii00 310 396 RENT 

BHENTWOOO ibdrm patio pool subterra 
nmmr\ parking $875 310 395 RENT 
' waaMdaianiats com 



uda Ashe Center 



the health care you ve already paid for 



TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD PUZZLE 



ACROSS 

1 Fourth base 
5 Terror 
1 Help a burglar 

1 4 Party cheese 

1 5 In good time 

16 Actress Moore 

1 7 Oelight in 

18 Pasture 
entrance 

19 Mineral deposit 

20 Sot! leather 

22 Croorwr Como 

23 Lhasa — canine 

24 Caboose s place 
26 Large lily 

29 Retreat 

33 Etching fluids 

34 Kind of pool 

35 Gtrafte s place 

36 Steals from 

37 From Havana 
36 Jostle 

39 Snoop 

40 Cavalry sword 

41 Hawks abode 

42 Where to buy a 
Milky Way 

44 Dot 

45 Sfwka s tivaming 
48 L— any man 

46 Concentrate 
51 Freedom 

55 "Once — a time' 

56 Guffaw 

58 High spirits 

59 Twitch 

60 Tally 

61 Famous lioness 

62 Dark 

63 Oyster produa 

64 Huny 

DOWN 

1 Embraced 

2 Garfield s 
housemate 

3 Force 



. _Pf»EVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED 




2001 uniaa feature SynacaM 



4 Green gems 

5 Writing tables 

6 Proportion 

7 Ireland 

8 100% 

9 Change hair 
color 

10 Rapidly or 
sk)¥Vly e g 

1 1 Malt t>everage 

12 Kuwaiti royalty 

13 Minuscule 

21 Health dubs 

22 - Mall London 
street 

24 -M-A'S-K clsrtt 

25 Pizzazz 

26 Haat 

27 Oak product 

28 Qaddafis 
country 

29 Dietary plus 

30 Color of lapis 
lazuli 

31 Stand-up - 



32 Ruble 

fraction 
34 Band 

instruments 
37 Cars for hire 
36 Was a member 

40 Winter sports 
gear 

41 Curly hairdo 
43 Peanut bunar 

variety 

46 Bigger 

47 Aaress 
Barrymore 

48 Volcano in 
Japan 

49 Ftoady to do 
business 

50 Bonie stopper 

51 Emanation 

52 Earthen \m 

53 Gl s dinner 

54 Yup'' 

56 Racing circuit 

57 Mellow 




Dispid' 
206, -^-^ 



■Ml' III 1. 



tr» «^ » ^' * ».-»^ 



4<> VtomijN .luiH 25. '4(N)I 



DaiK'Bruin 



Dailv Brum Classifird 



Apartments tor Rent 



Apartments lor Rent 



WALK TO UCLA 



www.keltontowers.com 

310-2081976 



GAYLEY MANOR 
ARTS 

Iaihh Clean 
S///t,'/< \ A I Hcdfoonis 

Across the Street from UCLA 

Watk to ViUage 

Near Le Conte 

N,-i Pets 

729 Gaytey Ave. 

(310)208-8798 



^ 



WESTWOOD PLAZA 

GREAT SUMMER 
DISCOUNT 



Bachelors $525-$820 

Singles $750-51 200 

1 Bedroom ..$1000-$1 200 

FumMied - UtiNties IncludML 
Short t«nn svaMaMe. 

31 0-208-8505 



CULVER CITY soacious ibdmi landscaped 
va'd. large excellent closet space $695 
<i; 39s RENT MrwnM wesisiderentals com 

MAH VISTA lowntiouse iJtKimis ' S Lwtti 
li'.'iwdstief w d- ti()<)Kups parking $t19f> 
'V' 396 RENT www westsiderentals com 

NEARllCLA ibdrm wood ttoors new paint 
• year-lease SlOOO/morim 8 unit tKtiMing 
AyiiilatXe now' Belly 310 479-8646 

PALMS 1BDRM IBTH $925/mo Newly 
iiriintHd qaTed parking inlercom lacui/i 1 '^ 
t)io.:K Iv UCLA bub Kay 310-842-9127 

SANTA MONICA Apanment cat ok jMtlief 
r mkImO gr.MI location $69? 310 395 
f'f \T .•.■v.v, wt'sti^derenials on. 



AMA MONICA LOltaqt tCKlmi nardwood 
'■, *,(!». I D»?,«ch*Mair Street $1145 
. 1 ■<>?■ HEM www weslsideif ntiiK com 



5ANTA MONICA rjuoie* leai Doait^ larqt 
siinri,;, K mnnt^ turnonft utiiitifs in< liided 
$• " 31(1345 7368 www westSicl.TtM. 
tais cam 



f BRENT MWOR 1 
APIS 

.\\iikI W osIwimmI lonls 
I mil.- H. L'CI.A 

Singles, 
I ik'l llctinxiiiis 
l\ml Niai luis lint- , 

No fK-ls 

1235 Federal Ave. 

Noai W'll.shiic BKd 

.(310)^77-7237. 



SANTA MONICA guesthouse wini a view 
Pet ok maid sen/ice $800 310 395R^NT 
www wrestsiderenials com 

SANTA MONICA STUDIO $875 walk to 
markettiub street parking available 9'5 
Garage $lSO/rnonm avaMMe now 1234 
•4tf' Street 310-471 7073 

SANTA MONICA iripie* pet ok 3 bedrooms 
'I'sfiwastier nardwood Hoors $1900 310 
«4f RENT www westsiderentals com 

SANTA MONICA pet Ok port room reing 
f'rator stove mon^^ to-rrwnm $450 310 
m5 RENT www westsiderenlals com 

SANTA MONICA i? bdrms relriqerator 
stove patio parking included $1200 3i0 
395 RENT www westsiderenlals com 

SANTA MONICA Garden style ibdrm re 
Irigeraioi stove parking $890 310 396 
RENT www westsiderentals com 

SANTA MONICA Townhouse 2bdmis 2 5 

t)atris N ol Wilshire A/C W/D hookups 
S'2»4 310396RENT www west sidermi 
lais com 

SANTA MONICA L*pper bachekif hright 3 
t'io':Ks to hearri $425 310 395.RENT 
www westsideientals com 

STUDIO in tmautilul pnvate house w/back 
yard harriwnnd floors and assigned park 

"(J Only one rrole Irom UCLA Soul^ ol 
Wilshire 310-470 7594 

VENICE heach iMrm ocaar vww iitiimes 
■'•riiided $fl«#f iiOSgS-BtNT wwwwMt 
sideienials com 



Classifieds 
825 2221 



J 



"% 



W(:stw<K)d \'iiid>^( 

AAA KriKMl .\\C 

1 Bedroom from $1225 

2 Bedroom from $1700 



Extra large luxury units include 

• f-ully equipped kitchen 

• Central heating and air 

• Extr;i closet space ^ 

• Wetbar 111 selected units 

• Private t)alconv 

• 2 Bdroms have 2 baftis 

• intercom entry & gated parking 

'wiiti 1 ytariease 

Prokr;sionallv irwuQed tr, 
Inloeralcil Kruptrrtv SorMccs liw 



VENICE 6 blocks to bea^h 2bdmis paik 
ing $1050 310-395-RENT wwwwestMdaf 
entals com 

WALK TO UCLA WESTWOOD Singles 
tt)drm/1Mh 2bdrm,'2bm Pod |acu22i walk 
in closets lirepiace luii-fcitciifln gated ga 
rage instant broadband avail www keltrxi 
lowers com 310 208 1976 • 

WEST LA ONE BEDROOM $950 Ctose to 
bus/market 1242 Barry Ave Just south ot 
Wiishne Available Sapt 1 -year -lease No 
Pels 310-471 7073 

WEST LOS ANGELES 2t>drms rclrigeralor 
stove parking $800 310 995-RENT 
www weststderentals com 

WEST LOS ANGELES Apanment upper 
3bdrms 2baths plus den Dishwastier 
$1200 310 395-RENT ¥»ww westsideren 

lais com 

1 f^ 

WEST LOS ANGELES Close to UCLA 
bright utilities included $390 310 396 
RENT www westsiderenlals com 



WESTWD. WALK UCLA 

Small 2bdrm,iMt >".■• .mo itifd 't>tn 
$1450 & $1485 Parking slove retrigeralot. 
laundry room Available' end ol August 
Beautitu< hardwood liocs-carpets Large 
?bed/'ibath beautiful hardwood floors 
$1850 310-8242112 

WESTWOOD 

Bachelor Naar campus 310-444 1478 

WESTWOOD 

Charmmg. ibdrm. $1400 irKhides all utilities 
HanMwood floors Ibdrm $1300 on Midvale 
969GayleyAve K 310-208-7123 

WESTWOOD townhouM pal ok rafngera 
tor Move iacu2zi parking $1250 
www waatSMlarentats com 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE Furnished Bachalor 
$725 Ratngarator hoi-plaie UMilies paid 
No parking One-year laase No pats Avail 
able Saptember 10990 Strathmore 310 
471 7073 

— -■-I- .111^111 I . .1 ^^— ^ ■■ I 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE 
TOP LOCATION 

Ibdrm lumor $1150/month All utilities and 
one parking included Days 310-475-7533 
evenings 310-659-4834 



^ 



Summer (Discounts 

Sir>gle $950 $1045 

1 BD $1145 $1395 

2 BD $1645 

2 BD w/loft $2015 

660 Veteran 
2CW-22S1 



WESTWOOD VIUAGE Unturmshed 1 bed 
room $1400 10990 Strathmore Furnished 
Ibdrm $1350 547 Landlair 1 year lease 
No pets Available Sept 310-4717073 

WESTWOOD Bacheloi $795- uMilws paid 
no parking 'bedroom $1400 3-car park 
tnq 10943 Roebling i year taMe r«o pett 
available July 310-471 7073 



WESTWOOD Pnrt rm 
ctoaelt garag«^ uiiiiiiaa 
3B5-RENT wwwwaaiMa 



m 
310 



iiM».i 



8400 

Apartments lor Rem 



8^00 

Apartiiients liir Ri'iit 



84^00 

A(i;inm»Mi»v for Rent 




If 



Luxury 4«arnments w "ttie Heart of tMiestwoo(f" 



♦ PALMS • 



LOrr TOWNNOME. FP. 
CENTRAL AIRMEAT. GATED GARAGE 
SEC ALARM. CAT ON 

2*0 2BA rOWNMOME. fP. CENTflAI. 

AWVHEAT GATED GARAGE 

SEC AUWM CAT OK 

3814 FAMS OR. S13H/MO 




• • 



GuENRO. 



APARTMENTS 
GLENROCK 

AND 
LEVERING 

Sinitle. 1&2 
Bedroom .Apartments 

|- .1 Blocks to Campus 

Rooftop Sundrck & 
Spa 

Fitness Koom 

Study Lnunftr 

Laundry Facilities 

Gated Assigned 
Parking 

Individual alarm 
systems 

MICH. MUCH MORE! 

RESERVIYOUR 

APARTMENT NOW! 

SUMMER 01 

F.\LL 01-02 



West LA. living at its l>est. 




# Close lo tfwatr^s. shops & restaurants 

# Beautiful arcfiilectural details througfiout 

# One & two tiedfoom apartment homes 
1 ♦ Ne^ designer inienors 

# CiOurmel kttctien 

# Built in appliarKes 

# StateK>f-tfie-art fitness cenior 

# Roof-top sun deck & ip» 

# Controlled access A gated parfciwf 

# Extensive Resident services 



Call Today! 

(310)47*^205 
10983 WeWworth Ave. 
Los Anfeles, CA 90024 

thep<a2a#rwselby.com A 




Casablanca West 
Available NOW 

1 Bedrooms from S1195 
Bachelors $795 



530 Veteran 
208-4394 



8600 

Condo. TovA/ntiou«.p for Ppn» 



WESTWOOD Watk lo UCLA Studn. liliMies 
mdudad $575 323-«34-REI^ www west 
icom 




LEVERING ARMS 

Large Sunny 

Singles & 1 Bedroom 

Apartments 

Walk lo S< hool aiHl Vlllai!r 
No Pels 

(310) 208-3215 

667-669 Levering Ave. 
Near Cilcnnick 



;1fs 

2 Bedroom.'? Bath 
tj * Private <{ara<)r » /pnvate enlranr«M 
.^ 2r^ivdlrfkTk.s (Vcanvieu 
"^^ Short distance to all 

'"^ ' Santa Mohk <i srhools 

Short dislanrr lo IrpndN 
Main Strcrt & beach 
[wm ISOOsq Irct 

yjuly I $2500/monlh 
MH (310)566-1111 



87 OO 

i)IUl!l ll)WlltUH(S» ttJt S.llt 



CITY VIEWS 

WESTWOOD bnghi tk«^tto«h condo 
w/city kghiB views Mm tmm «nd pamt 
BMcony and Hn^Ma iMMNy buidns 

Pool, apa, aMaa. tm pany mam iNMk id 
W'eaiwood viNaga and UCLA $227 000 
Shon/Romax 310-473-0156 

IMAGINE OWNING «VIL9HME Comdof/H 
Rne wn0a. lor mam |ltgK-<Z80K 
*o-UCUk/Mk«a. wnnnuan 
pool lacum sauna 
I 310-478 I835e« 109 



Displa) 



\lon(lj\. luiic 2.'). 2(M)I 4": 



^700 

Condo /Townhouse for Sale 



WESTWOOD Flooded w/sunshine' 
itxJrrrviblh condo w/some mountain views 
Secunty pool ipa gym Munas and more 
Parte and tenn« courts across the street 
to Wesiwood Village $209 000 
310-473-6156 



8900 

House tor Pen? 



SANTA MONICA houae. pet ok ibdrm 
itiath. plus dan hantuMiod w/d hookups 
$1295 310-395-WENT wwwi 
tals com 



9itOO 

Room tci' Rfiii 



1 BEDROOM 1 Baih 2362 Overland Ave 
Microwave Small relngerator $450 pkis uW- 
lUes 310-475 5673 



8900 

H(itis( lor Rent 



2BDRM/2BATH 

WESTWOOD REMODELED CONDO 
QUALITY UNIT w/hardwood/tile Hoors 
Gramie counMr lope dwhwaaher parking 
laundry awail l il ij now $1975 and $2500 
310-276-4S05 



BEL AIR HILLS 

2t>d/2t>a bungalow wiiri piJur hardwood" 
liodrs tireplace central A/C parking laun 
dry Pets ok $2500 31^276-8505 

SANTA MONICA house 3bdrms hardwood 
tloors. wM garage $2000 310 396RENT 



9300 

Room tor Hrli 



MUST SEE! 

WLA large one bedroom with balcony, large 
in 2 -story. 3bed- 
eniry Laundry. 

pool walk to bus I5mwi to LXTLA Female 

only $S72/month Kale 310-592-2585 Avail 

able 7/1 

WESTWOOD LIVE IN 

NEEDED Room/bath with !>eparate en 
trance in exctiange (or 3-4 mghts/week o( ba 
bysining Long term only 818-421-6006 



SPACIOUS STUblO &bath m private hoine 
Garden setting Fireplace Some lumiiufe 
available For responsible male post grad 
who likes dogs Relerencas please 
$690/monlti 310-472-0042 



9700 

SuOiets 



SUBLET & ROOMMATE 
SERVICE 



FIND or LIST A SUBLET!! 



>A/ww thesubiet com 



|8MblaUinaWcitiaa!!(201-aP*-11M) 



Got StuFf? 




BRIGHT CLEAN BEDROOM with private 
bath in 2bed house to share wrth recent le 
male UCLA grad Females only $600/monlh 
310-478-0208 



9700 



Melveny 8 Myers LLP 
LawFimi 



Siiblc 



tWESTWOOD FALL QUARTER SUBLET 
9''i'i'i/02 (appro* i luuiriously spacious 
2bed2bath $1200 own bedrtwfh $600each 
to share bed'bath Darnel 818-618 2448 



bhorper'xS omm.com 




Every Monday 

Ceaie ta KercMioH IW ta arfvertrte. 




— Nl:irkt'tj)l;iLV()istiiamM()-sruaent deals € ^ — . 

Hver\ *(ediiesda\ aiid Fnda\. the I>aily Brum (ilavsifitds jinivides Brum Barnaitis .i 

place wlwre simlenLs are able lo adwrtise ;»bs(»linel\ KKKH* «Miie ol tlie best deals m 

*estw(K)(i Check weeklv lor updates so vcni diMi I miss (»ut oii ^reai saviiiip' 



ttem 



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2iy 



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21 MONITOR 
SPORT SWITCH 
ABDO-ERPRO 

BED ' 

BEDFRA ME 
BED-QUEEN '.'■ 



»»q.mutwl 

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_3io-4g7-eo4i 

310-497-6041 
J10«4-a565 

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213-480-5773 
310-440^)027 



BOOKSHELF 

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CALCUL ATOR 
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RECRUITMENT 2001 

JOINING A FRATERNITY IS FUN, SIMPLE & EASY! 



REGISTER WITH THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

Register now for Fall Recruitmenti There is no cost or obligation artd you will be 

nr»iled irrtormation over the summer 

UE-maU McOucla.edu OStopby 105 KerckhorrHaN 
U Register online at www.stuclent9r0ups.ucla.edu/IFC 

ATTEND IPC RECRUITMENT INFORMATION EVENTS 

IFC will hold a kick-oft event and information forum before recruitment laegins. At 
ttiese events, learn about the Recruitnnent process, and meet representatives 
from each of UCLA's fraternities 

ATTEND CHAPTER RECRUITMENT EVENTS _ 

Each fratemity schedules a vanety of events which include meals, speakers, 
activities, etc This is the best opportunity to meet the brothers of each chapter 
and evaluate each fratemity on a personal level. 




2001 IFC Executive Bomrd 



Friendships tor Hh 



UCLA Interfraternity 
Council 

Fall 2001 Schedule 

Monday Septet'iDe; 24 
12-3 pm Kick-off Fair and Reception 
Drake Stadium 

. jav Septe^be'- 24 

7 pm Chapter Events Begin 

■ K tralernity schedule in Daily B'uii 

11-3 pm Informational Fair 
Westwood Plaza 

^^ec " September 26-27 

Sundown No official recruitment 

activities m observance of 
Jewish holiday 

Wednesaav October 3 
B pm End of Official Recruitment 



Questions: Contact IFC in 

105 Kerckhoff, 310/825-7878 or 

www,studentqrouDS.ucla.edu/IFC 



SOROIIITV RECRUITMENT 2001 




Spring Bmek 2000 ihttotgattable 
' ¥1101 your t 




Dear New Brum. 

Congratulations on attending UCLA' Mjiy may be 
wondenng wtiat sorority life is like As a woman wtm 
did not expect to join a sorority upon entenng UCLA. I 
understand your confusion After deciding to go 
through sorority recruitment on a whim. I realized it 
was the best decision I could have made Being in a 
sorority has given me opportunities that are not 
available in any other single organization on this 
campus. Not only does my sorority provide scholarship 
resources leadership positions, affordable housing and 
philanthropic activities it has become my home at 
UCLA My sisters truely are like family and I can't 
imagine going through life without them As I enter my 
senior year I appreciate even more what the Greek 
community has given me and I encourage you to learn 
more about us. 
Sincerely 

Jacguie Hamann 

Panhellenic Director of Recruitment 



Women's Recruitment 


Fall 2001 Schedule 


12 pm 


4 
Kick off Fair & Reception 




Drake Stadium 


7-8 pm 


Orientation Meeting 




Moore 100 


Sa'i/-: 


' ^ 


9 am 


Potential (\/1ember 




Check-In (g^ Brum Walk 


10 am-7:25 pm 


1 1 events 


SunOdv S- 




9:30 am-6 pm 


8 events 


Monaav u^' - : <- 




5:30-9:50 pm 


4 events 


Tuesday Oc 't'?^ . 




6-1 0pm 


Preference Night 


\/\/ednesa ■ 


A 


5 pm 


Bid Day 



Mom's Dmy and Dads Day provide 
Ofifiortumtme lo share your aoronty 
i ¥»itti your parents 




you a break Irom 



gnm 



FOR QUESTIONS & REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

Email: Danhel@ucla.edu and leave your name, summer address & phone number. 
or call 31 0/206-1 521 . or you can find on-line registration at 
¥ifww. studentgrouDS. ucla. edu/panhellentc 

Watch for our 2001 Greek Life Booklet whrch will be mailed to all Incoming students in August. 

V^HECK IT OUT...GET IHVOLVED! 
www. greeklife. ucla. edu 



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<DK^ OKA nK<D lAE IX IN lOE IH 0X OAX 0E TRIANGLE ZBTz 




\. 



and Stock Up on Provisions 



Fast Trade 





Fast Tmck 



-•St- 




Tbeiang^si 

and Women's sportS¥vear with 10% 
discount available for UCLA students everyday. 

Essthtiils— ^-AU the necessary school supplies, including 
/ X ^^*^ spirals and notebooks. 

^LA---— ^Offers low academic prices for UCLA 
Computar rK>t available elsevvhere. Great deals on 

and software. 






Essentials 






Computer 
Store 



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i%^2^t^«^^AVi^ 




Market ----^ Snacks, sui^Htcold beverages, cards, 

gift wrap arxl more! 

B tokZofie — ► A full servfce bo(^tore with a wide rangi 

general interest, acadenric, technical and 
— V reference titles. 



PLUS 



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Copeiaatrs Sports, Moby 



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FuU<olor photographic 
journal of UCLA campus 

BookZone 





airline tickets 

courtesy Southwest A 



Find entry details on the UCLA Stor^ 
insert enclosed with your Housing 
pocket this summer! 




www.uclastore com 




UCLA 



DAILY BRUIN 



SiTvir^lh* r<'L\M»nirTiunii\ situi- V.)V.) 



M<tNli\V..Ir\K2r). 2(M)1 



«\\\\ «l;iil\l>riiiii III I.I <-«lu 



Time Tor mon* (iore 


Life's a *x»ach 


Wild weenies 


. U" Al wan ts I h« ■ | >r« -sid* 'm>' in 


Lt'jirn a^Mn^t Iwmh \oll«*yJ>all 


KH< K^s W<'<'ni«' H(»as( rcalun'd 


:' 2(M»4.h<(JlM«nf'rstiiy in lh«' 


ami ihr Hruins who |»lay it. 


♦•xriJiri^ |M'rlorinaiM'<'Naiul M>m«' 


s|K»tli0U. VIEWPOINT, PAGE 5 


SPORTS, PAGE 12 


surpriM'mn'sis. A4E, PAGE % 



Summer sessions may alleviate Tidal Wave 11 crunch 



CNROiLEMWft t^nif ffsify 

hopes to speed progress, 
free up spa<T diirinp year 



By 

Daily Bruin Senior Stiff 

It increased siimmer $e»sion 
enrollment c«»ntinueN over ihc next 
decade, the liniversit\ ot California 
expects that it cur alleviate the 
crunch caused b> Tidal Wave II 

Reduced lees, summer rmancial 
aid and participation in the incom- 
ing transfer incentive program b> 
the .SIX largest academic depart- 
ments at UCLA have led to a 20 per- 
cent increase in overall summer 
enrollment and a 45 percent 
increase bs UCLA students, accord- 
ing to summer sessions director 
Dtivid Unruh. 

UCLA IS one of two campuses 
expected to be hit hardest by Tidal 
Wave II. as roughly 6().(MM) addition- 
al students will enter the UC over 
the next decade B\ ollcnng more 
required courses lor students to ta4(c 
over the summer, the I nncrsity 
hopes lo speed progress and tree up 
ckiNNfoom space during the academ- 
ic year 

If summer enrollmcm continues 
to climb at the systcmwide level, the 
UC could save S20(U(M) million 
because of classroom and facility 
space that will not need to be built to 
accommodate the new students. 



according to I C" reports 

"The plan of reduced fees is 
Morking better than anyone 
expected." linruh said "Students 
are really taking the courses that 
count toward requirements, and 
that should help them ^i through 
fasier " 

In May 2(KM). Ciov Ciray Davis 
entered a contract with the state 
legislature to phase m .state fund- 
ing for the summer quarter if the 
UC upholds Its end of the bargain 
by meeting 40 percent t»f the 
enrollment that is accounted for 
during the regular school year 

A 4 percent annual increase in 
the state general fund, along with a 
1 percent increase toward full 
funding to eliminate "budgetary 
shortfalls" in maintenance and: 
facilities are incentives lor the L'C 
to enter the agreement 

The Umversity s shift lo fees on 
a per unit basts has made financial 
aid availability possible, pulling the 
y}C toto year-round operation, 
Unruh said Because summer ses- 
sions now run under the same guide- 
lines as ihtwe for the regular acade- 
mic vear. students qualif> for the 
same financial perks as those during 
the rest of the yenr. 

This means that students eligible 
tor work-study during the regular 
sch^Htl year may take advantage ol 
the program during the summer lor 
the first lime 

"We've sent out <»(K) referral 
forms." said Elizabeth Paniagua. 
work-stud\ coordinator "We re 



i >;■ 



UC ANTICIPATES REDUCED FEES 



Incrf ased enrolltnent with nudmts taking up to 40 pfrcpnt of regular courseworfc ioadi 
dunng thf summer may miramiff space crunches from Tidal Wave U. 



!200(M)1: State Budqet act provides j 
i $13.8 million to reduce summer 
jj^ion 2001 fees 



1 2101-02: Governor s budget 
I mdudes $21 million to fund 
j summer enrollment at UC Berkeley, 
I Los Angeles andSanta Barbara 




25 percent Increased enrollment at 
UCLA for summer session 2001 



Jl 



State and federal Hinds subsidize 
financial aid ynce summer session 
2001 will be changed on a per-unit 




UC estimates that inaeased 
summer session enrollment over 
next decade could reduce number 
of new bdlities needed to 
accommodate students, thereby 
saving the university $200- $400 
miHion S 



MSB 




• man. UMmiy H (jMb«< IMir o( 'mrAM 



actually looking for more employers 
to sign up for our program " 

Another tinancial incentive is a 
tec waiver of up to $500 tor neu 
transfer students 

The SchiH>l of Fnginecring and 
the psycht^logy. hnglish. pt>lilicai sci- 
ence, economics and sociolog\ 
departments are participating in the 
incoming transter incentive pro- 
gram, which enrolls transfer stu- 
dents in Session C lo salistv as man\ 
requirements as possible 

Since prerequisite courses are m 
such high demand, summer sessions 
have relieved crowding in these 



VICTOn CH{N.'D«ty Bium 

courses over the remaining three 
quarters, said Laurie Okimoto- 
Wheatley. student affairs ofticer lor 
the psychology department 

Lach department is given 25 slots. 
which they may till on their imn cri- 
icna Students arc notified b\ phone 
or e-mail if accepted by the program.: 

"To be eligible, they have lo enroll 
lull-time Ml the tall, she said If 
they don't, they have to pay the 
money back " 

Ihe tnglish department, as with 
most of the other departments, cur- 
rently has 12 lo 15 students enrolled 

As of now. spaces have been given 



oft a ftrsi-comc. first-served bas'is 
because the university did not have 
sufficient time to plan how it 
wished to implement the program. 
Unruh said 

Because this is the program's 
tirst year, it is still m its piloting 
stage and will be reassessed after 
transfers ctmiplete the session 

'\\i further accommodate the 
changes in students' needs, starting 
this year and tor all summer ses- 
sions thereafter, the university will 
cut some upper division courses 
and offer more lower division 
courses to meet the demand of stu- 
dents taking prerequisites or gener- 
al education courses 

"We've increased the number of 
classes available by 10 percent." 
Unruh said "But we ve been filling 
seats that were empty ^\ Mtm- 
mer " 

Lub courses and composition 
courses are among tili M^ in 
enrollment 

Since January, the university has 
hired more leaching assistants and 
taculty to teach these courses 
Unruh said the ratio of non-tenured 
to tenured taculty wilt remain con- 
sistent with ratios during the yeai 

Summer Sessions has also worked 

with campus resources and tacilities 

namely libraries and n>mpulcr 

labs - to extend hours this summer 

tor students 

"Wc want Id make sure we have 
the academic support services avail- 
able for all who will be here " Unruh 
said 



University cuts down 50 Eucalyptus trees 



SAFETY: .Ariwrists advise 
removal, but community 
members oppose decision 



By 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

Only mounds of din remain /is uni- 
versity officials order that the 50 
Vimmalis Eucalyptus trees, which 
have lined Westwcxxi Boulevard for 
72 years, be cut down for safety rea- 
sons 

"The bottom line is that this is a 
safety project." said Jack Powazek, 
assistant vice chancellor for Facilities 
Management 

Bui others disagreed with the 
removal of the trees 

"It IS an outrage to me." siiid long- 
time Westwood resident Steve 
Goldberg "Something that links the 
school to something that old with his- 
tory, and they just decide to cut it 
down " 

UCLA decided to spend $69,000 
replacing the .50-loot Lucalyptus trees 
with Canary Island pines after an 
investigation by two independent 
arborisls. university officials said 

"These trees arc near very heavy 
irafTic areas and having received 
reports from cTrtified arborists that 
these are a safety hazard, we must 
remove them." Powazek said "The 




REvking stmcture oxistruction 
to dose down Intramural Field 



SUMMER: Project alters 
IM sports; teams utilize 
Drake area, Incrediballs 



'ANt ',v ^. .* v«v H»i;" Vtwr** St,# 



Stunnps remain after workers cut down 50 Eucalyptus trees thait lined 
Wilshtre Boulevard in front of the UCLA Medical Center last week. 



safety of students, stall and visitors is 
more important than these trees." 

But Cioldberg said the university 
could have approached the situation 
differently, such as trimming the trees 
or only cutting down the dangerous 
ones 

He added th<it if the university had 
to cut down the trees, they shoukl 
replace them with other Eucalyptus 
trees instead of Canary Island piiKs 

The Daughters of the American 
Revolution originally donated KO 
Eucalyptus trees in 1929 The univer- 
sity has since removed .10 trees 



because of old age. disease and decay 
Six oI those .M) actually fell, and 
two of th»)se hit cars." Powa/ek said 
"The last one (hit) on the first da\ ot 
classes last fall Luckily it hit the trunk 
ot the car half a second earlier it 
would have hit where the driver was 

Bob Hansen, one of the indepen- 
dent arbiirisis that conducted rhc 
investigation for UCLA, said the 
trees became sick from several vears 
»>f expansion 

After widening Westwood 

SmIHI 



By 

Daily Brum Senior Stdff 

Construction of a new parking 
structure, which is to provide an 
additional 1.500 parking spaces to 
the UCLA community, is expected 
to begin this summer beneath the 
Intramural Kield 

The iJniversity of California 
Board of Regents approved the 
funding ot S44 million tor the pnv 
posal at Us May meeting m San 
Francisco, according to Renee 
lortier. associate director »>t 
Transportation Services Parking 
Services, along with the university s 
C apital Programs office, will select a 
contracl(fr \o build the parking lot 
wuhm the next tew weeks 

Eorticr forecasts the project will 
be completed bv hall 2001 The IM 
Eield will be closed beginning this 
summer and through<fut the dura- 
tion of the pro»ect 

The field's cUwure will decreaiwr 
the already limited amount of space 
availabk for campus sports and 



recreational activities 

But UC LA Recreational Affairs 
plans to find alternative venues with- 
out having lo cut programs during 
the construction period 

"Clearly losing nine acres of play- 
ing field grass, when you're on a cam- 
pus that has the second least amount 
of playing field grass of all colleges 
over 25,(KM) students, is a problem." 
said Mike DcLuca. as.s(x:iate direc- 
tor of Recreational AITairs 

DeLuca said his office worked in 
tandem with Parking Services, while 
plans for the new lot were being 
devekiped 

In addition. DeLuca said when 
the protect is complete, the campus 
will benefit from an IM field that has 
a new surface and new drainage and 
lighting Practices tor IM and club 
sports will be rel<Kated lo btMh the 
North Athletic f leld and Marshall 
Field at [)rake Stadium 

IX*1 uca projected slight varia- 
tions in some sports due to space 
constraints, such as the planned use 
ot Incrediballs for IM softball teams 
I think we ve got a pnvactive plan 
to try to minimize the overall 
impacts We re gt>ing lo be creative.' 
[XH.uca said 



\1(.n<lj\ )un< 2:.. 2(Kil 



DjiK Brum News 



Superior court finds Westwood frm paitialy at faii^ 



; fli • 



VERDICT: Mclims mother 
pushes to raise guardrails 
urapartn>ent eomplejies 



Bv 

Ddily Brum Sentor Staff 

NlmpK twn \car> atlci ihf dcnlh t)l .1 
lorrmT" I (I \ -.tudL-ni the Li>> 
\n^l.•l(.■^ SupcruM ( oun lound .1 
WcsiwcHHJ piDfKTiv-ivwninj; t'irmguilt\ 
'■ iicLiliucnci.- v^hcn thf .ip.trtmcn; 
huiliimy l.iiicd lo nice; acceptable 
nmldini! CiKies 

Krjs Kui/kc r<'. lei! lout •stories U> 
tii^ dealt! or Jul\ I" I^W alter irip- 
piiii! .>\e' the irackmi; ol .1 slidinj: jiiaNN 
di'ii' ^Uiiie dnnkmt: al a part\ 

[ .i< month, the iur\ lound R N^ 
Selr>\ \( .' >»^nerof :^r" Midvalcand 
.1 nuniher o! other West\MHKl complcv- 
ev 2^ porcent t!uilt\ rn a civil ca.sc ot 
^auvition iti the accideni hecause the 
ap.irtmcni did not compK with accept- 



able building codes 

BecauM' ( alilomia in a "ctmipara- 
iive lault stale, the |urv can calculate 
the guili percentage as thc> sec I'll, 
atlectmp nionev distribution 

The court ordered Seibv lo pa> 
SIKO.tXKi lor "■k)ss of love, sttcietv and 
aflection" lo K.ut/ke s lamilN 

Sclb\ ii. ( o declined to ci»ninien; 
u hen contacted and its altome\ could 
not be reached 

Ouesiioning the saleiv ol the build- 
inu lo\ kut/ke. kn> ffiother. urged 
cii\ investigation ot the apartment 
complex in \ovemtxT IW*; 

I pon investigation, citv oflicials 
lound tha! the balconv guardrail 
kui/ke lell over measured .^5 inches 
hrgh one inch shv ol the acceptable 
standard tor non-public areas accord- 
ing lo the IX-parimeni ol Building and 
Salctv codes AdditionalK. the tracking 
ol the slidini! glass door measured 2 ^ 
inches high, two inches over the legal 
limil. accordmg to citv olficials 

The C il\ ol l.os Angeles Housing 



[department issued two orders tor 
Sclbv to comply after noting the breach 
Irom the area s unilorm building ctxles 

Selbv retrofitted the balconv and 
tracking to compiv with the standards, 
but onl\ in thai particular unit, accord- 
ing to Alvin Gomez, the kutzkes 
attornev 

kids should be in plaices that are a.s 
sale a.s can be." said Jo\. who is trying 
to have 52"^ Midvaie raise its balconv 
guardrails to 42 inches, the minimum 
height required in the cimimon areas ot 
the complex 

Ciome/ said that because the bal- 
conv Is ItKated on the exleruir at the 
building, it should'V considered part 
ol the common area, making the mini- 
mum height 42 inches instead ol the ^^ 
inches sanctioned lor priv ate areas 

While the kut/kes and others sav 
the accident occurred hecaui>e the 
apartment did not compiv with build- 
ing code standards, according to 
dome/. Sclbv said that kut/kes alctv 
hoi consumption that night caused the 




COiViivi Lfi mj Etuep 



Ss 



University creates 
faculty position 

The universitv is accepting applica- 
tions and nominations lor a nevk asst>- 
ciate V ice chancellor lor lacuitv diver- 
siix Applications should be sent lo 
the AV( hacultv Diversiiv Search 
( ommittee bv Aug I 

According lo the ^V{ facultv 
Duei^if Scared ( ommittee cre- 
.r.ioi; !'! ihe ncv^ piisition reallirmv 
( ^ 1 \ V Jedic.tUon lo l.iculiv divers • 

I !u' n;." >..!' who hokiv the nev^ 
•-> >n;'. ; m: ~ evpeclei! lo pursue l.iculh 
. j'>i . .1 . p.ir 1; .ic.ideniK e\i.e - 
i.'M. . .:: 1 1 \ I ne vmI^ repor' t ■ 
.. .'i.iiivi.'lio' 10' ..u.ioeniu pe' 
- 'ii.' i! .; ,ul\is,' :tK' wii.iiueiio' .iiui 
■':, .'v.Mi'iv ,■ \ ivc ciiaiKelio- 

\ .injij.iu-- mus! n.i\. liie .icidcPi- 
, .rjaeiiu.ii- !iecess.ir\ 1. be hiretl 
!.••.; I ( I \ tenured pi>siiior. Ihe 
p. >NiiMii uili i;o inio etieci in wmier 
21K1; 

Spring Midnight 
Yell uneventful 

Burning couches, firecrackers and 
water balloon tights al midnight dur- 
ing finals week mav have been a short- 
lived tradition lor UCLA students 
spring quarter 

"You could describe this quarter s 
Midnight \e\\ as uneventlul." said Ll 
Mannv Ciar/a ot university police 

According to Garza. L'CPD issued 
fewer than one dozen citations Most 
citations thcv issued involved noise 



complaints 

T ive or l(t minutes and it was 
over We were out ol the area in 20 
minutes." he said "A lew fireworks 
were the highlight of it ' 

Midnight Nell is the tradition 
where students scream lor several 
minutes outside their apartments or 
on r<H)ftops to alleviate the stress ol 
finals week 

During Midnight Yell in fall IV«W. 
officers from the Los Angeles Police 
IX'P'iftmeni arrested !*> students lor 
arson ,ind 01 failure to disperse 

Bui hv tail 2(MKi Midnighi Ncli 
aciiMlies had subsided due to 
increased unnersitv recuialioiis 
I ( Pn entereu into an agreemen; 
with L MM) to patrol Midnighi Yell 
nc^-iusc ihev leii siudcni^ would 
rjsp. md better ii> campus police 

I commend them lor usin^' 
I ( I'D Mislead or L\ PI) said Rvaii 
McManus .1 lourth-vear business 
ecv)nomics siudent 

but McManus also thought the 
I C I'D s presence was more than il 
needed lo be 

Thcv re not needed in lull force 
rhev had like 5(t t;ops in two hours, 
geared up at b or " p m . " he said 

Both UCPD and other university 
administrators say they are satisfied 
thai they have reached their goals 

"Wcve brought it back to where 
wed like It to be." Garza said 

UC vice president 
receives award 

Cornelius L Hopper, vice presi- 
dent lor health atlairs emeritus of the 



University ol California, is the recipi- 
ent of the first National Medical 
Fellowships Founder's Award 

The Natioiuil Medical 

Fellowships, a private nonprofit orga- 
nization, was founded in I94t> to (Pro- 
vide financial aid to Afrtcan- 
Amencan medical students 

Hopper IS a medical statesman of 
the very first rank." IK" President 
Richard C" Atkinson said in a state- 
ment "National Medical Fellowships 
could n<it have chosen a more appriv 
priate person to honor with its first 
Founder s Awartl 

• Hopper retired in October I9*W 
alter 2tt years with the UC" As vice 
nresidcnl lor health atlairs. he 
presided over long-range planning 
and poiic development lor .1 
statewide health sciences academic 
establishment that is the nation s 
largest encompasMng 14 health pn>- 
lessions scho«tls that enroll I .''.(KKi stu- 
dents and provide clinical training in 
I C s maior medical centers and alTil- 
lated hospitals throughout the state 

Before joining the UC . Hopper 
brought together a network ol physi- 
cians, dentists, nurse practitioners 
and>administralors to create a multi- 
county primary care network in rural 
south central Alabama 

Shortlv after his formal retirement. 
Hopper, at Atkinsons request, took 
on the job of chairing a l4-meniber 
Medical Student Diversity Task 
Force Hopper currently serves as 
chair of the Board of Regents at 
Samuel Merntt College m Oakland 

Repofts wom OiMy Bniin Hmf snd twifp 
services 



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accident 

Kut/kes friends at the party said hi.s 
drinking was under control 

Regardless, prosecutors said the 
owners are aware of student drinking 
and should take extra measures to 
ensure minimum safety standards are 
implemented 

"I m not a proponent of alcohol, but 
I understand the reality of what goes on 
and so do the owners. " Joy said 

"They should make .sure standard.^ 
are raised: they don't have the right to 
hide behind alcohol "' 

Ciome/ said that kutzke would not 
have fallen ofV the balcony if it w as at 42 
inches, despite drinking thai night, 
because his center of gravity was 
around .^K to 4() inches. 

"Anything that hits you lower than 
the center of your gravity will cause you 
to bend in that spot." Gomez said 

Because the |ury cannot order Selby 
to raise their guardrails. Joy said she is 
on a mission of her own. 

She said she will push to have the 



complex and other apartment build- 
ings that house mostly students acrosts 
the state retrofitted to ensure safety, 
adding that this victory will aid her in 
the prixxss 

'We have a document (the trial sum- 
mary) that indicates there was negli- 
gence and causation on behalf of R W 
Selby." Joy said 

'What we did very clearly put them 
on noticT " 

But CJotnez said Selby II Co is not 
compelled to fix anything in the build- 
ing unlc*ss further inspection proceeds 

"The jury only awards money." 
CkHnez said. 

io\ said she liofies to spread her 
story nationally, to educate the public 
about the many injuries and deaths that 
(K'cur from balconv falls Raising the 
standards of building safety in college 
areas IS her long-term goal 

"(The verdict I will help me get to 
people wh<^) want to make a dilTerence 
and maybe save one person's life." she 



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Accmim Earaitwes: 6fri jumor; fi*ia OMXho- 
Account RcpmtnMiMK M^n [tt(itk< 'ac/t^ni 

QHBRCS vRptay WCBMIt CIRMINK NXf 

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Unwenity Account Ite^rHMMiMKMfQd' 

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Communications Board All rights are reserved Reprintirtg of any material in this putlli- 
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policy on rKKi-discnrmrtation The student media reserve the right to refect or modHy 
adveftisir>g whose content discriminates on the basis of ancestry, color, natior^al origin. 
race, rehgion. disabtlny. age, sex oi sexual onernation The ASUCLA Communications 
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Esteemed professor Nobel Prize recipient dies at 82 




.i»»f^v ol iK t* »'tic>fnqi,ii»»»\ 



I J. Cram, a Nobel Prize-winning UCLA professor, 
died of carKer earlier this month at the age of 82. 

UC UCLA medical 



LAMfSUTT: Former intern 
claims undue scrutiny of 
performance due to race 



OBTfUARY: Oam's colleagues, 
students remember his son^s, 
bow tieji, sc^ienliftc discoveries 



ByLMilM ■' ■ 
Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

His colleagues called tiim "Don." grad- 
uate students called him "D J ." and 
undergraduates called him "Prolessor 
Cram ' But the> all knew him as the gu> 
who always wore bow ties and played his 
guitar on the last da> of class 

Donald J (ram. a Nobel Pri/e-win- 
ning chemist who worked at UCLA lor 
more than 50 years, died of cancer at his 
home on June 17 at the age ol K2 

Since he started teaching at U(XA in 
1^47, C ram has worked with more than 
20() graduate students and taught about 
8.000 undergraduates 

"He had extremeK high standards, but 
he was so accessible to students that even 
il" you weren't the best student, he made 
you feel comfortable about what you were 
trying to learn A lot of times at big uni- 
versities, you don't have professors that 
focused on leaching, but he was." said 
Beverly Sellc. who studied under C ram 
both as an undergraduate and graduate 
student 

Selle recalls how (ram would wear a 
bow tie to school each day. whether he 
was lecturing or working m the lab 

Once as a jt>ke. Selle and the other 
teaching assistants arrived to class wear- 
ing white shirts and bow ties which they 



managed tti take, from his drawer Cram 
didn t understand the huiruir when the 
class started laughing ^ 

He thought. What s >o lunn>'' He 
hadn I a clue." Selle said 

Btirn in Vermont in 1^14 to Scottish 
and (icrman immigrant parents, (ram 
earned his bachelor's degree in chemistrv 
at Rollins ( ollege in florida and his mav 
ter's at the I niversit> of Nebraska He 
received his doctorate al Harvard 
I niversny 

At I'CLA. (ram published more than 
400 research papers and seven books In 
195V. he co-authored a lcxtb(u>k with 
(atlech profes.sor (ieorgc S Hammond 
called 'Organic Chemistrv" which has 
been translated into 1 1 languages 

While man> students are familiar with 
his textbtuA. more often thev remember 
him for his singing Always on the last da> 
of class. Cram would appear with his gui- 
tar and sing such tunes as "I (jave M> 
Love a Cherrv" and a song that turned 
out to be a parodv of chemistrv 

"Here would be this guv. W) years old. 
climbing up on (the stjige i. and he'd plu|ik 
his chair down and play his songs. ' Selle 
said. "Sometimes we'd clap along " 

Often, (ram's former students would 
return on the last dav to hear him plav 

"People would come back year after 
year and wait for his performance.' Sellc 
said 

Acciirding lo Roger Helgeson. an assiv 
ciate research chemist who wtirked with 
Cram for nearlv 25 years. "La Bitmha' 
was one of the chemist's favorite songiL 

L ncoKveniional in other wavs. Cram 



, once drove up m front of Campbell Hall 
on his motorcycle because he was laic ti' a 
class he Mas lecturing 

IX'spile such behavior. Cram went on 
ti> receive the title of university professor 
from the I ( Regents in l*)SK. designalinp 
him as a pri>fessor at each of the campus- 
es This honor has only been held by 
about 20 people 

In NKI he shared the Nobel Pri/e f»»r 
creating "host-guest' chemistry, which 
allows scientists to buul large molecules 
ti) smaller ones .''>. 

.According lo an Oct 20. |y87 article in 
thc"^ Daily Bruin. ( ram said of the celebra- 
tion his department held in his hiinor "I 
went from being a scientist to a celebrity 
in one hour My hope is lo return lo the 
former status as sot»n as pt>ssible " 

Cram's other honors include the title of 
California Scientist of the ^ear in 1^74 

"When he gave the acceptance speech 

he pulled out his guitar and gave a 
three-stan/a summary of his research 
career, causing the science writer tor the 
Los Angeles Times to walk out." said 
Christopher Foole. a prolesst>r of chem- 
istry whtim Cram hired 

In l*)**}*. the Chemical and hngmeering 
News included (ram in their list of the ""5 
most important chemists of the past 75 
years 

Besides science and singing, (ram was 
an avid surfer, skiier and tennis player 

According lo M hrederick 
Hawthorne, a university professor of 
chemistry who was the fifth graduate .stu 

See OMM, paqr 4 




I win go to trial in discrimination case 



By 

Daily Brum Contributor 

A ct>urt of appeals, which reinstat- 
ed a former medical intern's racial 
discrimination lawsuit againsf the 
University of California and the 
UCLA School of Medicine on June 
6. u expected lo set a trial dale for 



early next month 

Admitted to the UCLA Sch(H>l of 
Medicine's intern prt>gram in l*W\ 
David Dixon's internship was lermi- 
natcd in March 1994. two months 
before he was to obtain his license to 
praclice medicine in (all forma 

"The medical schtH>l operates like 
a giiod old boys' network and as the 
only black in my department. I felt 
singled out and overly scrutinized." 
said Dixon, who is asking for $ 10 mil- 
lion in damages and compensation 

While he said racial discrimination 
played a role in his terminatum. the 



"As the only black in 

my department, I felt 

singled out," 

David Dixon 

Plaintiff 



university cites poor evaluations 
from his supervisors as the reason for 
his renuival. 



y 



"Although the university is disap- 
pointed in the court's ruling (lo rein- 
state the case), we bdieve wc have a 
.strong case.' the I ( Office t»t 
'Ckneral Council, which represents 
the university, said m a statement 
I riday 

"The University believes it will 
prevail afler it has had an opportuni- 
ty to present it> position to the trial 
court." It staled 

Dixon initially appealed his termt- 
nirtion to the Department ol 
Medicine in 1994. claiming racial di.v 
crimination 



An ad Imk committee composed of 
medical school facuhy concluded 
that It was unlikely he was discrimi- 
naled. because multiple ctimplaints 
o\ Dixon's inadequate performance 
had been reported by his supervistirs 

The campus counsel als«) reviewed 
the case and decided the inlernshir 
program s decision was not racially 
motivated 

Dixon then t(H>k his case lo the 
courts, where lawsuits have been 
pending since I9VK due lo a series o\ 



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lidih Brum News 



TREES 

From page 1 

Hi>ul(.-v.iti.t ihc iic^* Lurh came wiihiri 
inches i)l ihc tree nnXs and restricted 
itu- nxit /one the .trea when the 
roDis needed tn spread. Hansen said 

Maybe a eouple ol trees ct>uld 
ha\c been saved lor a couple more 
vears but this *vas the right thing to 
do." he said 

Hansen ais4> cited pipe trenching, a 
change in the level ol soil surrounding 
ilie root> and the concrete Irom the 
Medic.ii Pla/a placed over roots, as 



contributini; lo the trees detcrixua- 
iion 

^ccoTdlng to the Tree Adv»v)r\ 
( ommission lot the ( itv ol Sierra 
Madre ( anarv Island pines grow to 
about 40 leet 

I'owa/ek said the university decid- 
ed to use the pine trees becau!>e ol 
their strong riH>t structure, straight 
growth and last-growing qualities 

But according to the commission s 
Web Site. C anary Island pines have 
relativelv shallow and aggressive 
r(H)ls and can damage v^alkways il 
they aren I given enough space 

On luesdav several people 



protested the cutting down ol the 
hucalyptus trees on Westwood 
Boulevard According to the June 20 
Los Angeles Times, environmental- 
ists cTiticized the university lor not 
inlorming the community in time tor 
an independent arbonsi to investi- 
gate 

Powazek said the university sent 
out a memo to 2,500 university ofTi- 
ciais 

Many students, who had already 
left lor summer break, did mH know 
nt the afTair 

"This IS the first time I am hearing 
ol this." said Christine Riordan. a 



lourth-year Spanish and international 
development studies student and a 
member ol the Environmental 
( uaiition "But it seems like some- 
thing that I would have gotten 
involved in " 

Gail Cowling, executive officer at 
Kacilities Management, said the uni- 
versity will cut down the trees in 
Westwood on June IK-2*> as part of a 
first round The second round, which 
will include the Eucalyptus trees along 
the northern part of Sunset Boulevard 
near the liniversity Elementary 
Sch(K)l. will begin in August. 

Superintendent of Grounds 



Michael Kitasalo said everything 
from the trees will be biodegradable 
Wood from the trees will be ground 
into chips and spread on areas ol cam- 
pus lor weed and erosion control, he 
Mid. 

Corrina Aragon. business n unag er 
of Patient Relations in the Medical 
Ptaza. said she will miss the trees, but 
she understands that they must be cut 
down tor safety reasons 

"It IS very sad to cut do%tm beautiful 
trees like that." Aragon said 

With reports by MichaeleTurnage, 
Daily Brum Senior Staff. 



PARKING 

From page 1 

l! - not iiomi' u< be vvithoul 
some pain but I rcalh think the 
Uiliirc bcnelils will outweigh the 
inipaci> he continued 

Ihc parkin}; structures con- 
*.Mui.tioi: had conic under lire 
v^hilc It vva> in Its planning! stages 
\roft^ >oinc members ol the campus 
o>mmunii\, v^ho said the universi- 
i> shi>uld allocate Us resources to 
public transportation options 
rather than build more parking 
spaces 

Once ol the project s critics, 
public policy Professor Donald 
Shoup v^ht> also directs IC LA's 
Institute of! ransportation Studies. 
p«>inted out in March that the cost 
ol building 2' parking spaces is 
enough t»> fund the BruinCit)' bus 
program lor .i year 

BrumCio'. which provides free 
rides to Brum C ard holders on the 
Santa Mt>nica Big Blue Bus line 
W(m I be in eflect this summer but 
vmII resume in the fall 

The completion of the nev^ 
structure mav begin to ease the 
parking sh(»riage problem on cam- 
pus, but with an increase m enroll- 



meni and projected campus 
growth. It IS unlikely the number of 
parking spaces im campus will be 
able to meet the total demand an\ 
lime so«,)n 

Bui Kortier said even with an 
increase in summer session enroll- 
ment her otTice was able \o accom- 
modate cvervone wh(i needed a 
piiss this summer The universitv 
has issued 4.^(H> student parking 
permits so far lor the summer 

I nlikc during the regular sch(H)l 
year when parking passes are 
issued on a need-based pt>int syv 
tem. Parking Services doled out 
summer permits on a first-come, 
first-served basis starting m earlv 
May 

I '("LA parking officials also 
recently announced that for the 
first time m two years, thev are rais- 
ing the fines lor parking violations 
in an attempt to keep up with cita- 
tion fees in the surrounding area 
and to discourage would-be viola- 
tors from misusing I i(LA parking 
lacihties 

f-ortier said that revenue Irom 
the parking citatums are used to 
supp«»rt the Campus Express bus 
program as well as alternative 
transportation programs, such as 
UCLA van services. 



DIXON 

From page 3 

setbacks The judge ongmallv pre- 
siding over the case in 19^8 was 
disqualified due to his atViliation 
with the UCLA School of Law 

Last year, the Superior Court of 
Los Angeles County issued a sum- 
marv judgment in favor of the uni- 
versity and the Schw>l of 
Medicine The judgment stated 
that Dixon failed to prove racial 
discrimination was the motive 
behind his termination 

According to the court, Dixon 
did not present adequate evidence 
of satisfactory job performance 
The summary judgment's ruling 
said that 15 out of 24 of Dixon's 
evaluations ranged from p<xir to 
unsatisfactory 

But in June, the court of appeals 
in the second appellate district 
reversed the summarv judgment 
According to Melanie E Lomax. 
Dixon's attorney, the court found 
that Dixon had satisfied the 
requirements for admission into 
the program and that some of the 
dtK'tors who gave him ptH»r evalua- 
tions had not seen him perform 
medical tasks 



Lomax said the School of 
Medicine vuilated its policy by not 
informing Dixon of his poor evalu- 
ations prior to his termination 

"The School of Medicine is 
required to tell an intern if there 
are any deficiencies m their perfor- 
mance, and for six months Dr 
Dixon was given p*K)r evaluations 
but was not told of this at any 
time " Lomax said 

Representatives for the SchtKil 
of Medicine could not be reached 
for comment 

Lomax said few African 
Americans participate in the 
Medical Center's intern program, 
thus leading to an atmosphere of 
racial prejudice 

"Dr Dixon was only the third 
African American intern to be 
employed at the Family Medicine 
residency program at UCLA since 
\91'\. and because of this he faced 
a hostile environment in which bis 
performance was overly scruti- 
nized." Lomax said 

Dixon, who IS residing in 
TuCMtn. Ariz . has not practiced 
medicine since his termination He 
said he hopes his case will help 
increase the number of African 
Americans in the School of 
Medicine. 



CRAM 

From page 3 

dent to earn a doctorate under the 
Nobel Prize-winner. Cram's motto for 
life was "work hard, play hard" 

"And that s exactly what he did^ 
Hawthorne said 

Helgcson recalled that Cram enjoyed 
reading classical literature and that he 
once considered becoming a novelist 

Cram is survived by his wife. 
Caroline, and sisters Margaret 
Fitzgibbon and Kathleen McLean 

"He never really separated teaching 
from research . . they were just different 
sides of the same box He was just as 
turned on talking to sophomores about 
elementary organic chemistry as he was 
taking to his post-doctorate research 
people about their research problems." 
Hawthorne said 

"That makes him a truly great 
teacher and researcher and a very 
unusual person" 

The Department of Chemistry and 
Biochemistry will bold a memofial ser- 
vice this fall. Donations can be made in 
Cram's name to the organization of the 
donor's choice For more information, 
contact the department at (310) 82S- 
3958 







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— Dailv Bruin ^ 



Viewpoint 

Monday June 25. 2(M) I I 



i.ds VnmltN Lledions 



I)ail\ Briiii) ( oliiriinist 
|)rrs<>nts analysis of ta( tors 
leading to Jim iiahn s v\in 
in tht' nia\(>ral clcdions 

viewpoint tf^medMucla.fdu 



Al needs to ride his donkey bade into the limelight 




Ex-veep's failure 
to stay in public eve may 
hurt his chances in 2004 

Oh where, oh where has m> 
vice president gone ' Oh 
where, oh where can he be' 
With his days so empty and his bellv 
so full, oh where, oh where could he 
-be? 

In the midsl 
of my morning 
routine. <i& I . 
waited at 
Pu^/les for my 
smoothie 
before class, a 
large man wear- 
ing a dark suit, 
sunglasses and 
an earpiece 
walked m He 
stood stoically 
by the exit. 

apparently inspecting the joint for 
any suspicious activit> I thought to 
myself. "Wow. this guy looks like a 
Secret Service agent I wonder why 
he's here at UCLA on a Thursday 
morning." 

Of course, he was there to protect 
our almost-president Al Ciore from 
any menacing students lurking in 
Puzzles who might be looking to 
harm our beloved cx-veep 

Now a visitmg professor at 
I'CLA. Gore was on campus May 
10 to give a lecture on 'community- 
building " The commotion he 
caused made me realize (hat. other 
than a couple blurbs m the news 
about his post-election academic 
endeavors. I have heard very little 
about the activities of Gore since the 

Hansen is a poHtical scierKe and history 
student. Sooner or later, you will 
succumb to his views. Send your 
objections to kxkesmitt>#hotTnail.com 




Wipe awav those croctnlile 
tears. Al Without you al the 
helm, the DemocratiL Part\ 
lucks a unifying leader 
With the notable exception 
of Sen Jim Jeffords 
detection from the 
Republican Party, ihc 
Democrats have been 
lloundenng ever since 
Gore s defeat His div 
appearance from the 
national spotlight 
c.ivcs no strong 
voice Irom the left 
to counter Bush s 
conservatism. 
In their disar- 



o 



Supreme Court gave him the highest 
boot in the land, denying him the 
presidency in December 

Is he still recuperating from his 
colossal defeat'' Is he hiding from 
the limelight because he has put on 
more than a few pounds ' Or has he 
finally given up on the crusade 
against Bush s compassionate con- 
servatism'' In any case. Gores 
departure from the public eye is 
detrimental to the Dem(x;ratic 
Party, to his chances for election in 
2004 and to the L'CLA community 
as weH 



OUOHtfClMh ^^n,«^ -x-riKK SljH 



ray. the DemtKrals have consistently 
failed to present compelling alterna- 
tives to Republican initiatives, allow- 
ing them to make progress on tax 
cuts, education reform and missilc 
defensc Even without an elected 
position, (iore should mobih/e the 
ranks and travel the states in an 
attempt to get out (he liberal mes- 
sage 

Perhaps with the Senate in demtv 
cratic hands, things will change and 
the DeimKTats will get their act 
together But without Ciore. the 
party faces a challenge in (he 



upcoming presidential election 

Maybe Gore s disappearance was 
orchestrated b> the vast righl-uinj; 
conspiracy m an attempt lo elimi- 
nate the besi [X'mtKratic candidate 
lor president in 2004 Or maybe the 
smoking man m the X-llles has kid- 
napped (jv)re and replaced him with 
a duller and chubbier alien cUme ( )r 
mavbe not 

If Ciore insists on remaining a 
p»)liticdl hermit, the IX-mocrats will 
li>se a proven winner \oi onh has 
Ciore shown he can win the maH>rit> 
iifthe popular vote, but he has alsii 
demonstrated the capabiliiv to beat 
the man who he will challenge il he 
decides t»» run in 20(>4 

In addition. ( iore is the only 
potential DemtKratic candidate wht> 
invented (he ln(ernet 

Sure, (he campaign is a few years 
down the road, and there is still plen- 
ty o( time to declare candidacy, but 
the more time Ciore spends out of 
the public eye. the worse his chances 
are for winning in 2004 

If Ciore stays out of (he limelight 
for too long, the American public 
will forget about him His absence 
also increases the legitimacy of 
Bush's presidency, becau.se (he man 
for whom half of America voted is 
now nowhere to be seen 

Gore risks being replaced by 
ambitious party upstarts if he stays 
out (tfthe realm of ptilitics much 
longer Already (here is a growing 
cadre of Dem«Kra(s who may have 
presidential ambitions Ciore s own 
running ma(e. Sen Joseph 
Lieberman. is already in (he priKess 
o\ forming an cxploralory ci>mmi(- 
(ee and Senate majority le;ider lom 
Daschle is increasingly assertive in 
his leadership role within (he 
Democradc Par(y 

In my considera(e eflbr( (o pre- 
ven( (he reader from shuddering in 
fear. I will neglecl (o mendon (he 
name (ha( s(arts with "H" and ends 



University drinlcing 




• It 



b unfair to students 



AiXXMOL Claims made 
by officials are illogical, 
give Students little credit 



If administrators like Chancellor 
Albert Carnesale wonder why col- 
leges and universities continue to suf- 
fer from chronic alcohol abuse prob- 
lems, they might refer (o (heir own 
■MiqMMed reasoning 

la ■ recem response (o a studen('s 
question regarding the university's 
alcohol policy which is essentially a 
zer(v(olerance stance C arnesale 
begins by saymg. "I see no advantage 
to taking an action (hat would 
increase (he consumpdon of alcohol 
by students" ( Daily Brum. 
Viewpoint "Ask the CT»ancellor." 
June 7) 

However, instead of expanding on 
IIm idMk Carnesale continues by say- 
ing. **Viiifi dnnking of alcohol is a 
terious problem at universities 
nationally " Therefore, instead of 
believing that students would make 
responsible choices about alcohol 
consumption. iIk fsaeral opinion in 
Murphy Hall is (hiil greater access lo 

Soteros-McNamara is a fourth-year 
political science student. 



btwze IS going to mean more rapes, 
riots and headaches for (he 
University of California Police 
Department 

Nevertheless. Carnesale contra- 
dicts himself later by saying (ha( 
"inost UCLA students make respon- 
sible decisions " Following (his logic, 
even if (he drinking age were low- 
ered, the incidence ofnegative activi- 
ty would still not involve ■■mos( stu- 
dents ' 

So why K Carnesale afraid (o chal- 
lenge (he status quo'' 

The firs( answer is (ha( (he U'C 
prohibits the sale and consumption 
of alcohol at all university events, 
regardless of age Since (he universi- 
ty's policy IS more restrictive than 
state law. it would seem (ha( every 
person involved is equally inconve- 
nienced 

Bu( (his IS no( (rue Mysteriously, 
the l-aculty Center at UCLA can 
serve alcohol to its patrons Yet sitKe 
no siudent can enter the center or 
even be served at this location unless 
mviied by a faculty member, it is 
unlikely the 'binge drinkers" that 
Carnesale fears so greatly will threat- 
en university safety 

However, with this loophole. 
Carnesale insinuates students canno( 
make responsible decisions aboul 
alcohol bu( faculty members can 

Surely, many among the great 



minds a( UCLA have ba((led alcohol 
addiction, and to act as (hough alciv 
hoi rela(ed problems among lacuUy 
are less serious (han (hose m (he 
undergradua(e populadon is an 
insul( 

The second reaiion why C arnesale 
has no( challenged (he s(a(us quo is 
because he is a pragmatist 

There is no doubt that if alcohol 
were completely unavailable to stu- 
dents - less rapes, riots and fraternKy 
parties that strain university security 
resources would occur 

But the unrest at such "riotous " 
events as the now-infamous March 
- 14 takeover of Roycc Hall by student 
protesters cannot be attributed to 
"binge drinking. " the only type of 
alcohol usage C arnesale seems (o 
believe students engage in 

Instead. i( can be argued (hat as 
(he qualKy of life a( (he universKy 
condnues (o decrease. s(uden( in(er- 
acdon with (he au(horides and (he 
adminis(ra(ion will also condnue (o 
de(erioratc ^n angry and frustrated 
student b<xly combined with easy 
access to alcohol creates an explosive 
situation lor all parties involved 

C arnesale probably disagrees with 
this, since he claims at lea.st one-third 
of the campus arc (ee(o(alers anyway 

However, (he real reason thai 
UCLA remains frozen m Prohibition 
lies in neither of these aforemen- 



tioned possibilities 

Rather .idminislralors like 
C arnesale use the presence ol alc(»ht>l 
to Ignore the larger structural prob- 
lems at the university 

Alcohol is a much easier target as 
the cau.sc of unwanted .sexual assault 
(han. for example (he lra(erni(y sys- 
tem Binge drinking is a better villain 
lo blame for student-related prob- 
lems instead of (he U'CPDor (he 
S(uden( .Aflairs Ofl'icc 

Even The Economist, a very con- 
servative and staid British publica- 
tion highlighted the silliness of hav- 
ing the minimum drinking age at 21 
("Free Jenna'. June *>l 

Of course, any college s(uden( 
riled by (he age discrimmalion in (his 
country from (he bar st(H>l to the 
car rental l<»t must (urn the blame 
pardally on (hemselves 

The low voter pardcipaiion and 
political mobili/adon of IH to 24 vear 
olds has everything (o do with wh\ 
college s(udcn(s get shalteil while 
other age brackets dv not 

It's not impossible to think that il 
a m<itivated group of undergraduates 
wanted (o end (his iniusdcc. (hey 
could 

Yc( (he amount ol work to reform 
the system is likeK (oo much (o inler- 
es( a person who. in (hree years, will 
no longer be (he (arge( of the law 
anvwHN 



with ■ iltary " 

II the cx-vccp IS nowhere to be 
seen on the national level, he can 
only scarcely be found at I C I. A 
where he .iccep(ed .i proless«>rship m 
the School t)f Public Policy and 
Social Research Gore iiilends lo 
develop a curriculum on communKy 
buildmj; and hopes to bridge diller- 
enccs between all areas oi campus 
During spring quarter, he was to 
have a teaching presence meenn}; 
regularly with students lo the disap- 
pointment of many students. howe\- 
cr ( iore only showed up <'Mce dur- 
ing spring quarter on May Id 1 his is 
hardly a regular presence 

Also, his first session was inacces- 
sible to many >tudents. because you 
had to be chosen by a member of (he 
lacuhy from (he Sch(H)l of Public 
Policy and Social Research. Public 
Health. Medicine. Law. or the 
Anderson Schotil 

If Mr Touchy-feely is (rying to 
bring people together who are inter- 
es(ed in the same issues and bridge 
(he diflerences belween all areas of 
campus, why Can'( any UCLA s(u- 
den( si( in on his leclure ino( ye( 
plurah' Is (ha( community building 
Mr Ciore' 

Although i( IS an honor for 
UCLA (o have such a distinguished 
and accomplished figure as a visiting 
professor. Ciore has done little to 
interact with students and (caching 
I hope all you Muldavm support- 
ers launch a vigorous campaign (o 
deny Ciore his professorship, since 
leaching is (he mos( impor(ant com- 
ponent of being a professor here at 
UCLA 

My advice lo you. ex-veep Ciore. 
IS to slop crying, restrain from the 
Twinkle binges, begin actually teach- 
ing students at UCLA, and come 
out from hiding to show (ha( you 
can in lac( be (he leader of (he lefl- 
wing if you indeed have wha( i( 
takes. 




■mil amine 



C8lwniiist! 



Ivplicatl6iis 



available la tiia 



aim 

larckkaff lall. 

TiMvartaMla 

CiaaUaMac 

Maia's bn by 

Tbarsiay, let 4, 

bySML 



DaiK Bruin 




ldU<- d br<*dk from l(N>kiniL; foi 
dUorfiatives to Na|)st«'r an4„. 
visit thr DdiK Brum Online' 
wMwddilybruin uclaodM ■/. 
MoikUx ium' 25. 2(M)1 



Pop extravaganza has fans dancing in aisles 



MUSIC i)<"\(.f«'('s flock 
Id Dud^M'f M.kIiiiih I<»i 
\\iiii::(t Tiiii::<t ciuiccfl 



H. Sophia Whang 

Ddiiy Brum Seniot Sidtl 

•!;i.M *ij.i'- :^'\;-iHi.-i.i!iiii' l.ii 

Kiis-i \i . m: -, ,1 i,v.„ i.tdio 

^:.i!hmi Iii'>1c(.1 iIk' lliiiil amuial, 
ii>-ii,iui nii.-i;.i-\iMucn kii<'\Mi .t-- 
\\.mi;>' l.iiiL'. ii |)(>iti!i."i SMtiuim 
.■\i.-: iv\,> il.n-. i.isi S.iinriLi\ .ind 
Suikl.r* 

^tnkU-d It! I lie Dodger Suidmni 
Hiilicid ii'i itu c'.ciii .livmi: with 
U'.i' .Ki-iiinp.iiniiii.' .Iiinibiiiri'tis 
i.M iIk- i.iii> .iiul .m .iddiiuMial 
" ''(Ml loUlmi! ch.iir- u< .n.o>mnu»- 
J.ilo ilic l.iruc Lii'wd 

I hi.' .mdicncL' w.in tilled with 
^i.i/cd l.iii^ will' c.inK- \vilh h.ind- 
i;i.idc p>>Nicr^ .mil ..clehntv p.ir;i- 
p'ktii.iIm s. miv t.iii- ^■\i.-ii c.imt 
.i;o-M\t ,1- the:' !.!\.>ntc pfrtorm- 

I il> iv IMS Mliul I'llK- tUTl.- 

Vint \1,ift:,iic' IViLV 14 I ^.imi.- 
ii'.'i. I.. M.'!.- liu B.uk>in.-ci Bi'\s 
.!'ui Kkk\ M.inm m p.irikui.ir 

NI.'iiL' u!ih ilic B.kkNlivr! 
H.'>. ~ S,iUiri.l,i\ ■- 1.1 'IK' I'll .iK>' 

llJlkied •! VV \lkk,t I iKl.i 

kt\Ni.ii liif S,ini.iiilli.i Miiinh.i 
L'NNk.i Simp>>>i', Sluiei-'v, Nl'IK 
I urt.id.' .nut BliK- Vl.in drnup 
Hk- (.I'Difii ctulct.1 with ,1 d\n.imn. 
pi.-r|.>nii.ini.i.' h\ Rkkv Mariiiv 
..'mpieic vMth ^lr^.•^^^>rk^ ITic kinj! 
.)t 1 .IV \ot:a> V\.i\nc Sewion. wa^ 
.iIm> iin iltrd In cnlcrlain ihc cnmd. 
.iiid he hrouiihi aloni: h^ wil his 
^^ani>> ,tnd hiv liddic 

BritiK'\ Spears who disap- 
p.'iMled !ans with onK .i hnct 
.ippe.iiaiKC was Saturdav s L'uest 
ii>si \ci.<r Selnui Bkiii and 
kils ^ VI. 'si Re».)iiesied hosi 
c ,iis, m HaK made smpuse 
.ippe.iianees ih.il same d.iv 

Ihc perlorm.iiKes leatuievt sui 




Ricky Martin shakes his bon bon at Wango Tango to a sold out 

crowd on June 16 



prises as well, siieh as .IcNsica 
.Simpson hreakmi; into Sir Mi\-.i- 
ioi s B.ih\ (nM Biick and Bliie 
Man droup throw mj! marshmal- 
lows into the erowd Ihe crowd 
was cspeeialK excited when all five 
members ot the Backstreet Boys 
look ot1 their lakers ierse>s and 
sij!ned them betore giving ihem to 
luckv .uidiencc members in the 
Iron! f 

Shaiigv also knew how to work 
ilk ^lowd with songs Irom his 
i praiiinn w inmiiL' albinu 

\itendees m the whole slatluim 
WLie on then leet w.i\ing then 
.irnis .md singing aliMig with him 



He Liter brt>ught a V4»ung girl Irom 
backstage up l(* reprcNenl all the 
angels m Lo> Angclcs bclore per 
lomiing his hit single. "Angd " 

Phe crowd was sti encrgi/ed b\ 
NNangi> Tango s beats that u was 
Itching to come back lor more the 
lollowingdas 

The second da\ con<»isled ol 
well-known minKs such as Eden's 
(rush. Vertical Hon/on. Dream 
•\merican Hi-I i. Tyrcse. 
Aerosmith and the Bee (ices The 
show alst» included a Npecial per 
lormance ot the song Lady 



• W.K* Kit y !'.„i, Hti.u 



Sm 



paqeS 



(Top to bottom) Pop sensation 1 
Spaars hosts Wango Tango at Dodger 
Stadium on the first day of the concert. 
Aerosmith frontman Ste v e n Tyler headlines 
the second night of Wango Tango. 



Popularity of energy drinks increases within dub scene 



BAR: oniciiiK worn Ihiil 
(H'u hriinds arc Jiimfd nl 
parlNji/xTs. not alhlcU's 



By Krtstcn Wyatt 

The Assonated Press 

\l I WIN \evei mind wh.ii 
ihc label s.i\s I he new brands i)| 
L-neiL's drinks are .timed more at 
marathon parliers ihan serious .iih 
leies \nd th.il has health ottici.ils 
\uirrieil 

I he drinks eome in llashx cans 
.iiul honies with names like Red Bull 
\dien.iline Rush and tones Whoop- 
\^- I nerL'x nnnk I he\ don i t.isie 
L'le.ii hui lhe\ te the t.isiesi-grosMiie 
scgnieni ''the bever.ige market 
bei.auve lhe\ delivei .i quick punch '>< 
cnei L'> 

\ couple ot vears .tpo the\ were 
..'i; >>! .in undergroutui drink sei\"eil 
"hK .It ^lubs I'retiv soon the\ re 
L'ouiL' lo hi. i.'serswhere saiil Ni.ix 
Rodriguez .i marketing manager lot 
the I ilge ( o which imports Aiomu 
I nergs Drink Irom Bra/tl Ihev 
.•ti.ible ^ou lo practicalK sia\ up all 



iiighi .md not gel realK drunk 

Ihe energ\ kick is delivered b\ a 
cocktail ot stimulants Many ol the 
drinks contain catteme and guarana. 
,1 South American plant used .is a 
siimulant. plus a long list ol herbs 
and vitamins pnmiising better health 
.md athletic performance 

1 he> delinitelv deliver a bu/7 or 
a |olt. said .lohn Sicher. editor and 
publisher t>t Beverage Digest 
Ihev re generallv partv drinks A 
\erv large percentage are consumed 
in bars or restaurants and used as 
mixers " 

It detinitelv put me on a last 
pace said Flame Bartletl. ^K ot 
suburban I orest Park 

It gets vou drunker quicker it 
vou can stand the tasie ol it.' said 
Brent Isbell V). ot Anniston Ma 

\t ( osmopoliian a trendv mid- 
lown Atlanta bar bartender Chris 
B.iles once served 400 Red Bull-and- 
'.odkas Ml .1 night Ihe slim silver 
.ind-blue cans are stacked behind Ihe 
h.ii alongside the bourbon and rum 
and Bales described Red Bull as 
absoliiiciv the mosi popular thing 
we have 

We L'o through them like \ou 



wouldn't believe." he said "People 
want to get drunk and sia\ awake, 
and this prettv much dvKs both 

Ihc drinks are so popular that 
beverage giants C oca-C ola Co. 
\nheuser-Busch. Pepsi Cola and 
C adhury Schwcppes have all rolled 
out iheir own energy drinks in recent 
months or plan to launch them soon 

The drinks first showed up in 
nightclubs in New York and Los 
Angeles and were favored by revelers 
who like to drink and dance till dawn 
They spread to bars nationwide and 
are st)ld in liquor and griKery stores 
Most cost about $2 for 8 ounces 

Fans sav the drinks help them guz- 
zle alcohol w ithout passing out at the 
table But dietitians warn that fatigue 
IS the body s way ot saying it s had 
enough to drink and that energy mix- 
ers mav tool people into thinking 
thcvrc not as drunk as they arc 

What you'll be is a wide-awake 
drunk said Chris Rosenbloom 
head i>t the nutrition department at 
Cieiiirgiu Slate I nivcrsity "It s dan- 
gerous, this false notion that il I take 
thisenergv drink I m alert and C>K " 

ArxMher dietician. C ynthia Sass of 
the I niversity of South Florida, said 



several stimulants, when put together 
can amplify each other and become 
dangerous And. she cautioned, a 
long list of herbs and vitamins don't 
make a product healthv 

"Thev think if its natural, then the 
more the better That s not true. " 
Sass said 

Stimulant-spiked drinks can he 
tricky before exercise, loo. dietitians 
said A Kansas man suffered a heart 
attack in 1998 that caused perma- 
nent brain damage after drinking 
Ripped Force muscle drink, which 
contains cphedrine. then lifting 
weights 

The weight lifter Shane Garrett, 
now 25. sued the company that made 
the drink A |ur\ last month declined 
to award Ciarrett damages, finding 
him equally at fault for ignoring 
warnings on the drink 

Hansen Natural C orp insists its 
energy drinks are safe for workouts 

They re ideal drinking before 
working out if you re looking lor an 
cncrgv boost. Hansen chairman 
Rodnev Sacks said 

Sacks said energy drinks represent 
$140 lo $150 million a year in sales 
lor bevert^ mamilHCturers 



Mislclllu'athon 




A diverse lineup fueled KROQ's annual Weenie Roast 



Holat by CATHBMC imvCMy ki*i SfMDi iull 

After Staind's last song, the Stcme Temple Pilots made a surprise appearartce 
at KROQ's 9th Annual Weenie Roast at Verizon Wireless Amphitheatve. 




(Top) Sha^aMaO'Naal of tha Los Angeles Lakers atso made* 
surprise appearance and rapped for the sold-out cr owd at 
Verizon. (Bottom) Blink- 1 82's drummer, 'taalt BartMr. Mt a 
fast tempo during the band's set at W een ie ttout. 




By 

Daily Brum Senior Staff 

The stage rotated around to present yet 
another band, but all eyes were drawn to the 
bright sky. The "Superman Theme" provid- 
ed the soundtrack ah a helicopter hovered 
over head, circluig the thousands of squint- 
ing fans. 

Slowly the Lakers' logo and **Man of 
Sted" title became clear, as did SbtquiUe 
O'Neal waving from the cockpit. 

The Ninth Annual KROQ Weenie Roast 
invaded the Verizon Wireless Amphitheater 
in trvine Saturday June 23 bnnging two 
stages, It bands, more than nine hours of 
live music and a few surprises 

AltemaUve rock station KROQ 106.7 
FM put together a lineup for the c^haritv 
show that brought several headlming bands 
together on the same bill Concert tickets 
sold out eight minutes after they went on 
sole June 16 

Weenie Roast raised money for the 
Surfrider Foundation. Al Wooten Jr 
Heritage Center. Heal the Bay aad AIDS 
Walk Orange County. 

New to the Weeme RoMt this year was 
the Bud Light Punk Rock Side Suge. which 
was located over the sweltering blacktop, far 
removed frdm the main stage m the 
amphitlMaier. Dcq>ite almost unbearable 
heal, aaarpnd tes moshed and crowd- 
surfed to the MMadi of Sum 4L, The Lnring 
End. New Found dory and Pennywise 

Feanywtsc ctoted out the stage with an 



intense performance that featured songs 
spanning their long career 

"We requested to play this stage, so we 
could t>e here with you guys." Jim Lindberg 
of Pennywise told the crowd, refernng to the 
bands placement on the .smaller stage as 
opposed to the reserved-seating mam stafc. 
"Fuck playmg for the $200 seats." 

The rock band Stabbing Westward 
kicked off the main stage show later that 
day Crazy Town. Disturbed and The Cuh 
all tried to rock the crowd despite the very 
un-rock-'n'-roll lime of day A sunburned 
group of fans seemed more interested in 
waiung out the heat with their cold dnnks 
than getting involved with the show 

Coldpiay provided a break from the 
testosterone^lnven music of the afternoon. 
with mekxlic tunes that fit m perlectly with 
the .summer day festival teeling 

As the sun began tu sink beneath the 
mountain. Papa Roach and Linkin Park 
delivered their popular bard-htttmg rock tu 
an exated crowd 

The eclectic 311 took to the stage in 
Lakers attire Towards the end of their set. 
the band was joined by none other than 
SIhm| himself, who rapped over the sounds 
of 31 1 as he bounced about the stage and 
through the scTcaming audience It takes a 
lot of people to crowd^urf the more^tuin- 
300-pound Shaq 

The mo<xi of the concert seemed to shift 
during the intense acoustic live version of 
^Outside" by Aaron Lewis of the hard rock 
band Staind. as lifters throughout the 



amphilhealer and small bonfires on the buck 
lawn lit up the night sky 

The concert s defining moment came 
when Stone lemple Pilots ttx>k -over the 
siuge unannounced The t)and was not on 
the bill and their surprise performance stole 
the shcm. as lead singer Scott Wetland capti- 
vated the crowd with his stage presence. 

Stone Temple Pilots contnbuled a heavy 
dose of their older mau;rial along with their 
new radio single "Days ot the Week " The 
veteran quartet left the crowd chanting 
"STP" long after the band left the stage 

Next up were tiie three wisecracking jok%' 
sters Mark. Travis and Tom. better knowm 
;ls Blink- 182 Equipped with a full pyrotech- 
nics show. Blink 182 played their popular 
blend ot punk-pop. 

The marathon concert came to an end 
with a short but powerful appearance by 
Jane's .Addiction Perry Farrell and ci>mpa- 
ny graced the stage in glow-in-the-dark black 
light painl and costumes The echcv and 
reverty<hiven melodies provided a dreamy 
soundscape for the crystal-clear night 
Jane's Addiction brought the eclectic and 
intense show to a soft landing, as they per- 
formed their anthemic song. 'Jane Says." 

The Ninth Annual KROQ Weenie Roast 
was a practice in excess, with a little too 
much of everything. The show was a sum- 
mer music festival on steroids, sporting S6 
burritos, tK>nrires. hours of nonstop hit 
music, celebrities, surprise appearances and 
thousands of soldout sei.ts - all under the 
clear summer sky of an amphitheater 




f , ead vocalist of Sum 4 1 , starts off the 
day -long concert wttn loud arKi fast tunes. 



(Above) 

of New 
Found Glory plays 
on the Bud Light 
Punk Rock Side 
Stage at the Weenie 
Roast Saturday. 
(Left) 
lead singer of Janc^ 
Addiction, glows 
during the band's 
set, which 
concluded KROQ's 
9th Annual Weenie 
Roast. 



\|i.ini,i\ iniii 



jdlil 



I >jil\ Ki iiiii Arts L Ent*TUiinm«*n( 



Diiih Hruiii SfMirts 



\l(in«la\ 1un«- r./2«MM H 



Opera performances are 
finally available on DVDs 



TECHNOLOGY: in spih' ol 
^iiiiill niarkcl. iintu in^' 
xiN's cncoiiriJLM' liilx'ls 



\| U ' ' iKK \ 1)\ I) .Hill 
' .'•■ ^ ,!• ^ .,!». 1. ,11 ',ri , A I ■: 
'\ i I S..^ ■ .\'lt:' ..■Llln; 



:;k':' w.i;,i- 



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aivi kc ii; I i.iU- piCsi- 



I'ini.ii N ii.iiiiiiij; iiiwitci .icccp- 
:.iiKi. VViih i.iscrdiNtN UNsticii m the 
;w>)(Ki ihcrc was biji cnttuiM.iMii lor 
,1 hill ihi' ti.'sull ^v.!-. nTLiinlv loucr 
ill. in \M- h.tci hoped NVv h.wc lo mc.i- 
Mirc the Jcmand 

( l.iNSK.il imiMC ^ m.irkel i> titn 
comp.irfd ii> pop (I) iitk'N cm sell 



itisi .1 lew ihoiis.iiid iiiut> .1 v^eck .tnd 
;:i.iM.- ;Ik lop 1(1 .Hid the DN'I) iii.n 
kei :v even smaller 

\ tvendi I nivers.ii vvhieh osmis 

'Ik Deuisihe (ir.imnioplu)ti IX'cea 

.hkI I'hinps iaheis. didn i release its 

iHsi classical l)\ I)s until December. 

uhen II r>ii! out three hallet [>VDs. 

iKiudin;j ( iiseile ' and 

\iiicr.ickcr aik\ !oiir operas troni 

'hi- Mciropohum < )per.t conducted 

n .l.iiiic- I cine ' C .irmen" with 

\i:iK- H.ilts.i .ind lose ( .irreras 

N.il.i 'A Mil \prile Vliilo and 

I'l.iciJo Donjiiiiio. "I! I-'ovatore 

\;ih I aci.mo l'.i'..iroii! I ..i M.irton 

.iiKl !)■'!.".; /.iiitl ,iiKi the I)a\iii 

ilocMic M.iiiic 1 lute pioduciton 

\il: k.ilhiecJi Battle ami Kurt Moll 

!'. ■ -u\ui!K i;ri>\Mn_u S.irah 

i .ici sieiiau. unisjc business man.igcr 

■; I'loiiee! 1 ntertainmeni said oi 

he Li.is>ical I)\ I) market 

■\^e h.uc been li)cir>iing on the 
Metropolitan Opera There are \erv 
stroni! projirain titles tealuring 
I'lacido Domingo and Luciano 
I'.u.irotti We re locusine on i>ne a 
month perhaps certain months two 
I'robabK l> m :(K)i ' 

It s hard to judge hou well 
I niversal s tirst DVD releases sold, 
but Cjore said. "We re encouraged 
with the sales growth over the last six 
months 

The label has announced seven 
releases this month 



WANGO 

From page C 

Marmalade" by Chrisiina Aguiiera. 
Pmk. Vl\u and Missy Elliot The sec- 
ond da> also leatured special appear- 
ances b> Jenmler Love Hevmt and 
Sean P Didd> ( onibs. who inlr«v 
duced the pop girl group Dream 

Anytime we can get onstage to sec 
the lans and to be singing and dancing 
IS such a wondertul time lor us. siiid 
Kctte ol bden s Cnish "Its a time 
where we led we re at home 

We lust want to have a'giKnl time 
on stage, .iddcd Maile. alst> trom 
fcden sC rush 

T\\c members ot Eden's (rush, and 
most ot the other lemakr pertormers. 
were clad in midritl-shtiwing tops and 
hip-hugging low-riding leans The 
male perlormers came dressed diller- 
ently in casual altire 

\monu some ol the only tcmaie 
perlormers who were not in leans 
were the ladies ol " Lad\ 
M.irmal.tde wh>> were mstead 
dolled up in their lingerie as they 
lounged on sotks and strutted down 
the red-tarpeted stairs 

However, even without the use ol 
lingerie. modcl-turncd-Mnger-turned- 
•ictor Tyrese had no trouNc getting 
the audience excited 

"I dont know what to teel because 
I haven t gone on stage yet. but I'm 
really a crowd-driven perstm " lyresc 
said belwe his set "Whatever I end 
up doing will be because of what the 
audience calls me to be " 

The Bee Ciecs. the only ^group that 
has had a number one hit in each 
dcxade Irum the (Ms, to the '<Mk. hud 




Howie D. of the Backstreet Boys shows off his Lakers jersey JD the 

crowd at Dodger Stadium. - ;^ . 4; ; 



people dancing in the aisles during its 
pcrlormante ITie band was promot- 
ing Its new album. "This l> Where I 
i ame In 



Tyrese had no trouble 

getting the audience 

excited. 



Between each act there were enter- 
taining commercials played on the big 
screens, music videos and clips ot the 
radKi station s DJs mocking various 
movies, including a spiKit of the 
"Lady Marmalade" music video, 

.\ central theme ol btHh concert 
days was extrenK Lakers pridc- Tbexc 



were clips ot previous Lakers games, 
including those from last year s cham- 
pionship game P Oiddy appeared 
wearing a Lakers lersey. a.s did the 
Backstreet Bt>ys and Krystal The per- 
formers were alst) constantly stirring 
up the crowd with Lakers remarks 
and reminders ol thus year s champi- 
onsihip victt»ry 

Along with promoting unity 
through Lakers pride, most perform- 
ers were there to promote their new 
albums and make their fans proud 

"I've never been about the money 
or abtMJi being how huge I can be." 
Tyrese said 'Tve just always been 
about greatness and looking to make 
people proud " 

The word "greatness" just about 
sums up all 16 hours of Wango Twtgo 
This concert is likely to be a tradition 
lor many «i'"»'TrrT *" fnr 




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Ddilv Brum Sports 



SOFTBALL 

From page 12 

I ( I \ head LDiich Sue hnquisi 
\v,i^ excited lu he able U> host ihc 
LAhibiiion jiamcs and have the 
I .ish>n Stadium Mle available tor 
thceveni 

N\ith leam I SA playing m 
Hawaii ( anada and Venezuela the 
re^t ol the wa>. this marked the 
tiiil> lime tnguiNl was able to 
uaich her current pluvcrs in action 
It was also one ol hnquisl s leu 
davs od with ussistanl eoach K.ell> 
lnou>e-Pere/ on the recruiting 
ir.iil Although attending onl\ as a 
>peclator lather than in an active 
capacitv J nquist did en[o\ watch- 
ing pla\ers doing then |ob not to 
mention hei I (LA players intcr- 
.iciing with the Arizona players 
«li.' .inl\ .1 month ago deleated the 
Htuiiis b\ .1 score ol l-ti in the 
n.iiit'iial champmnship game 

I alwavs s.i\ e\er>i>ne looks 
L'. >.■<.! in red. white and blue." 
I III). list >aid The nice thing is 
iiKs. players get to know one 
another aliei playing against each 
olhci s(> competitively during the 
veai 

I nquist is prt>ud ol the tact the 
national committee selected seven 
Brums Ironi the 2(K)1 squad to par- 
ticipate in learn I SA On the I SA 



Red squ. d Nuveman is joined by 
pitcher outtieldei \manda F reed 
sh4>rtsiop Natasha Watlcy. Iirsi 
baseman Jairia Mims and pitcher 
keira ( io.-rl The I IC'LA players in 
I SA Blue include pitcher outfield- 
er ( ourtnev Dale and third base- 
man loria Auelua 

But l-nquist tell proudest ol the 
WPSl members displaying the 
legacy ol the Brum program 
hcrnande/. tirst baseman Sheila 
D(>ut> and third baseman Jennifer 
Brundage play tor the WPSL (i(.ld 
team, while pitcher Kaci Clark and 
mfielder Lyndsev Klem represent 
the Bruins on ihc WPSL All-Slars 
squad 

"I stand here st> proud becauiie 
we span the HOs. the '^h. 2000 and 
the new millennium.' Lnqui.st said 
"We span a lot of decades and that 
says a lot lor their level ol play over 
the years Just look at Sheila 
( ornell Douty To me. greatness is 
sustained over the year's, and she's 
got that ■ 

The games were almt>sl sec- 
ondary on the day where the past 
and present met ISA Red and 
WPSL (lolu .quared off m the 
more menu>rable of the games, 
despite the tact there was a ntvhit- 
icr thrown m the second game 

In 13 innings. l^SA Red pre- 
vailed 2-1 thanks to Kreed's pair of 
RBI singles, the second coming 



against hernundc/. her coach dur- 
ing the college season 

"She knows me and I know her. 
and It's kind of like a mind game." 
freed said "Its (usi a lot of fun. 
and I was excited to hit off of her 

Nuvemanjwalked three times in 
six chances, as il nothing had 
changed from the Women's 
( ollege World Series in which she 
was walked nine limes m 14 oppor- 
tunities Mims tallied two hits and 
Douty and Brundage each man- 
aged to get on base with a walk 
(joerl pitched .1 1/3 mvhit innings 
to get the win 

Fernandez, a hard-luck loser 
pitching with a tender hamstring, 
strutk out 13 batters m seven 
innings ol work before allowing an 
unearned run on Kreed's single. 

I ve worked with (the UCLA 
players) all year and watched them 
gri>w. and I was proud that we were 
able to compete. " Pernande/ said 
They re going to be the ones that 
are going to be expected to carry 
this country come the 2004 and 
2(M)K (Olympic) Games and so on 
So It was gtKHJ to see how they pro- 
duced and how the\ performed ' 

Team USA and the WPSL take 
different paths the rest of the way. 
but in one sunny afterncHm. the 
two collided to provide a glimpse 
o( the past and present of UCLA 
Softball 




Senior catcher Stacay Nuvmnm chats with UCLA head coach 
during a NCAA Regional game in the 2001 season. 




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DaiK Hruin Sports 



MonddN. lunc 2') 20<l| I 



Draft Day could impact Southern CaKfomia, Pac-1 teams 




L CLA waits to see 
where former poinl piard 
Earl Watson w ill be taken 



Earl Watson leaps above a Washington State defender during 
a game at Pauley Pavilion in January. 



By All 

[My Bruin Senior Staff 

With (he crowning ol a champion 
not more than a week ago. all eNe> m 
professional basketball turn then gu/e 
Irom the present to the lutiire with the 
upcommj; NBA Drali in New ^ork 
Wednesdav » annual event is sure to 
have an efTeci on the Southern 
Calitornia > college and pro team-* 

In WestwiMHi. the iiKus is on gradu- 
ating .senior tarl Wat.stvn The (vIchm-I- 
inch point guard was the constant lor a 
Brum squad that ad\anced to three 
Sweet Sixieen.>< under the iron-man 
Watsi>n> direction 

The prognosis on the draft status of 
the kansas C it> native has much to d(> 
with his exceptional plav at the two 
major priMlraft camps in Phoenix and 
Chicago The reputation of the small. 
yet physical floor leader, remained 
intact after both showings Watson led 
his squads to the tournament champi- 
onship games in Phoenix and Chicago 
with his consistent court instincts and 
impressive ability to get other players 
mvoived Complemented with a shtHM- 
ers touch from the outside, he is slated 
to go anywhere from late first to mid- 
second round according to NBA 
scouts 

At use. two of the Trojans' stars 
from last year's Elite Eight squad are 
turning heads on the draft boards l'S( 



forwards Brian Scalabnne and Jefl 
Trcpagnier. who is arguaHs the best 
athlete in the enure draft can expect to 
hear their names called in the late first 
round or earl\ second round at uorst 

l'S( senior forward Sam llancs 
who was an earix entrant projected to 
be- drafted late in the first round, decid- 
ed to withdraw his name from the drati 
and return for his senior season 

In the Pac-IO t onlerencc. the k>ss of 
so man> superstars irom the lop teams 
clouds the picture lor next »car s title 
run However since I (.LA didn t lose 
a single underclassman. lhe\ will be the 
likeh front-runners 

Cirand theft was declared in lucson. 
where the Arizona W ildcats were set to 
lose their entire starting five to the NB'\ 
belore guard Jason Ciardner mseh 
pulled his name Irom the hst ot earl\ 
entrants Bui the >V ildcaiN will lose the 
remainder i»r their starters to the proles- 
sional ranks ^ ' ' : 

As lor the rest of the Pac-TOs drali 
entrants. Stanford forward Jason 
( ollins is the onl> player with a giHKJ 
chance of bemj; drafted At 6-1 1. ( ollin> 
can plav the post and ha& ibm^fknnt 
range v '" - V 

rhe remaining players, who include 
Oregon forward Bryan Bracev Cat for- 
ward Sean Lamplex and Collins" twin 
brother. Stanford forward Jarron 
C ollins. will be luckv if the\ get drafted 
at all 

Twii SoC al high schoolers also 
entered the draft Although btrth o\ 
them arc over "" feet tali. onl> one oi 
them IS likely to get drafted Tyson 
Chandler of Compton. who might have 
to move to small forward m the N BA 



His decision to go pro was made long 
ag«). but had he chose to attend college 
UCLA was at the verv top ol that list 
Chandler is a verv fluid plaver who has 
good range on his jump shot He 
defends the post well but lacks the size 
and strength lo do the same in the NB^ 
More ol an open-couri plaver than a 
hall-coUrt player, lie needs to work on 
his intensiiv and work ethic (handler 
will likely be a top five pick due to his 
M/e and poienlial. 

( ompton - Toity Key in»wcver is 
.mother story Although he' was a greai 
high Nchool player at ( entennial High, 
he Is definitelv run ready for NBA-cal- 
iber competition Lven with his made- 
lor- SUA si/e. it is unlikely he will ixr 
drafted 

Since the Lakers hi>id no picks in 
Wednesday s draft, the Clippers arc 
LA s drafi-dav stor\ with the second 
pick overall and an early second round 
pick. No }" overall 

Thev need a point guard or a domi- 
nating center II they keep their firs; 
round pick. Utok for a big man like high 
schtnilers kwame Brown or Eddy 
C urry to wear the red. white and blue l! 
they deal the pick, ktok for Elgin Baylor, 
the Clippers general manager, to trade 
down in the lottery and add a veteran 
point guard like Mike Bibby to help lead 
a youth movement that is ready to make 
a run toward the playotVs next year 

Overall, this year s draft has nt) sure 
bets, but It could eventually go down in 
N BA history as one of its greatest drafts 
ever However, with four high schtxilers 
and four freshmen likely \o be lottery 
picks, no one will know how this drat', 
pans out for close to u decade 



RXyTBALL 

that 1 did get " 

Ebcll finished the day with 44 yards on 
1 1 carries, plus a 22-yard reception 

One future Bruin that did get to show 
case his talent was defensive back Matt 
Ware Ware got mvoived in the (aliform.! 
defensive effort on more than lit occasions 
over the course of the fame The combina- 
tion of his tackles, pass defections and 
blanket coverage o( Florida w ide receivers 
proved that Ware, with his amazing athlet- 
ic ability, is ready for Division I competi- 
tion Toledo and the rest of the Brum stall 
are hoping thai Ware can fill the glaring 
Brum vacancy at cornerback 

"I'm just going to concentrate my time 
on getting into the best shape of my life 
this summer." Ware said "When football 
season comes around. I will be ready, will- 
ing and able to do whatever the coaching 
staff wants me to do " 

Despite the efforts of Ware. Ebell and 
the rest of the Brum class of 2005. the 
Californians could not overcome the tena- 
cious, swarming Florida defense to seal a 



The Californians could not 

overcome the tenacious, 

swarming Florida defense 

to seal a victory for 

the home crowd. 



victory for the ht>mc crowd 

The Florida squad, led by quarterback 
.Adrian McPherson's 14 for 2.^. 24.Vyard 
performance, jumped out to an early 10-0 
lead m the first half 

The California squad responded with 
Its first effective drive of the game at the 
end of the first half Lemhart led the 
offense down the field with a long pass to 
future Fresno State Bulldog Charles Ealy 
setting up a first-and-goal situation on the 
Florida 2-yard line 

Ebdl failed to cross the goal line on 
three straight attempts, getting stulTed by 
Floridas determined defensive front 
Then with eight seconds to go in the half, 
Ebell finally skated through the line for a 



score 

The offense ruled the game in the third 
quarter, with each team scoring on their 
first possession scttinj! up the final score 
of r-14 

Just because the .score remained the 
same docs not mean the game was (uer 

In the final minute ol the game. 
( altlornia got the ball back at midfield 
after a 4ti-yard puni return by Demetrius 
V^ illiams Koral expertly moved the hall 
downfleld setting up a third-and-sevcr 
with the ball on the 21 -yard line and i'!' sec- 
onds on the cltKk 

iCoral needed only 7 yards for a first 
down, but he wanted six points instead He 
launched a lob pass intended for a fading 
Ealy. but it ended up in the hands of 
Florida cornerback DJuan Brown 

"I knew that time was running out and 
that a touchdown would have killed us." 
Brown said "He ran a go route on me and 
I used the sideline to my advantage, mak- 
ing sure that 1 was the only one who was 
going to catch that ball ' 

The interception marked the end of 
everyones high school career, with the 
players ready to move on to higher educa- 
tion and harder competition 




Jibril Rayme, an inconr>ing freshman, zeroes in on a 
future Gator at the Califlorida Bowl in Santa Barbara 



AVP 

Frontpage 12 



Tm not sure if it proves to be better 
for the game from the television 
standpoint and the fan standpt>int. 
then Im for it " 

Each leam consists of only two 
players, so each player is involved in 
every play The players have to be all- 
around athletes to compete in the 
sport at the professional level The 
phiyers also have to compete against 
the dunaie conditions, which include 
spending hours m the hot sun and try- 
ing to move in the sand 

"You have to be able to do every- 
thing, and a lot of people have difTi- 
cuhy moving in the sand." McPeak 
said "You have to develop sand 
\ttf.' and that takes a while " 

Armatlo, who is best known as 
Shaquille O'Neals agent, was one of 
the onginal founders of the AVP. and 
he played in an early variation of the 
AVF hefbrc there was any prute 



Why tfia AVP digs the Sniim 


UCLA voNeyball alumni currmtiy Miwohed wMi prafmoMl JMKh MicjteM 


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*'JeirNyfnRl(199S) 


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*JeiwrHfciWiiJiiiii(1996) 


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vnoncy. 

"We played for dinners and kegs of 
beer," Armatlo said 

He K hoping that the college mar 
ket will embrace the spon and the new 



graphic as the future pool ol b<ith the 
next stars of the game as well as the 
next group of hardcore fans 

"We definitely cant forget the col- 
lege market," Armatlo explained "In 



league He sees the college demo- fact, we have lo address it in a signifi- 



cant way. and certainly it is at the top 
of our list '" 

Some of the ways he hopes lo 
appeal to the c<»llege market is by 
combining AVP tour slops with 
extreme sports festivals Other pt>ssi- 
ble ideas under consideration include 
working with one ol the vounger 
skewing networks or holding beach- 
type festivals in arenas to develop 
interest in the landltKked regnms 

Legends of the game like Kiraly. 
believe thai Armatlo s NBA connec- 
tions will be the asset that helps put 
the AVP into the mamslrcam 

"i know he s got a loi of great con- 
tacts in the sports industry with some 
of the clients he represents in the 
sp<irts industry like Shaquille ONeal. 
and being cU>se to the NBA s sp*in- 
sors So we re optimistK thai we can 
build this into something great ' 

O'Neal IS probably the AVP fan 

with the highest profile, having been 

known to refer to himself in inl^- 

views as the "Black Sinjin Smith " 

"Yeah, that s awesome." Smith 



said "Actually, Shaq and I are unde- 
feated on the beach Shaq can play the 
game " 

And how would Smith handle Shaq 
if he were on the opposite side ot the 
net" 

"Id keep the ball away from him 
and make him set." Smith said, laugh- 
ing 

The players on the AVP tour arc 
enthusiastic that they get to play their 
favorite sport as a career They talk as 
if they would continue playing, even if 
It were still just for dinners and kegs of 
beer, as it was in their humble begin- 
nings 

"We play on some of the mml 
beautiful beaches in the world." 
Kiraly said "Its a real challenge in 
terms of being in better condition and 
playing a long lime in the hot sun on 
the sand 

"When you put it all together, its a 
great lifestyle ' 

Now. they hope that the rest of the 
country will embrace the sport and 
the lifestyle a^ well 



12 



Daily Bruin 



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Get more information on 


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Wednesday's NBA Draft. 


&■ 


See page 11. 



V1(nuiii\. .)un«' 2'\ 2(MH 



UCLA 



League sets beach voteyban for mainstream playr 



GAME: ()i-<:ririi/.(ili()n iiiiitlt's 
sporl siinpliflrs riilcs, ^i\t»s it 
opportiiriitN ruM'dcd to Ihrwv 



ByScenSdMittz 

Odily Brum Senior Staff 

I here In .1 league o\ prolosiDnal athlcte> 
ih.ii IN hiipiMi! u« eapiure the allcntu>n nl 
.'•ung \meik.i b\ shouca.Mnj; Un extreme 
.illiietieiNiii aiul ihe Southern t alilornia 
!iie>t\le 

Ihe Npuri challengCN it» pl.i>erv trL>m 
ever> anple \l\ played on one ol the most 
Jitikuh NurtaeeN imaginable The athlelo 
jjive gel hack lo their feet quK-lcK. and 
otien must immediaiel> dive again m order 
1.' maintain eonirol ot the ball 

Both the male and female partieipantN 
are part ol the same umbrella organization, 
often touring together And if that is not 
enough to grab a sports fan s attention, the 
athletes pla\ in their bathing suits 

And no. Vince MeMahon is not 
invoked with the sport in any capacity 

The sport is beach volleyball, and 
I eonard Armatlo. the new owner of the 
recently revamped \s>ociation of 
. Volleyball Professumals is ready lor the ^ 
sport to leave the exclusivitv of the coastal 
ii'mmuniiies and become embraced b\ 



mainstream America 

I love beach volleyball because ii com- 
bines a lot ol elements that indtnirs doesn t 
right now. Armatlo said Kor example, it 
has incredible lifestyle association. get>- 
graphic scenery and. of course, the sex 
appeal that exists w ilh the pei>ple playing in 
their bathing suits." 

One thing needs to he made clear this is 
beach volleyball, not indoi>r volleyball 
Although they involve similar skills, they 
are two completely diflerent sp«)rts 

What IS I ( LA s connection to the 
sport' Ihe Bruin.s dominate the world ot 
beach volleyball More than a do/en for- 
mer Bruins currenlh play the sport profes- 
sionally 

And the Brums aren't playing a passive 
role, they are the living legends of the sptirt 
Karch Kiraly and Smjin Smith, teammates 
on I'CLA s first undefeated team in 1979. 
are first and second respectively on the all- 
timc tournament victory list Holly 
McPeak. who played on L'CLA s I99() 
champion.ship team, is the only player to 
represent the I iniied States in beach volley- 
ball at two separate Olympics 

In previous years, beach volleyball suf- 
fered from a proliferation o\ leagues, each 
ol which maintained its own set of rules, 
and the stars of the game were spread thin 
among the rival factu>ns 

The top players now feel thai since the 



leagues are ail under the control of one 
umbrella organization, the sport will have 
an opportunity to thrive 

The mtHit important thing f«>r the stale 
ot volleyball m our country is the fact -that 
we have somebttdy credible now. who has 
the right vision for the sport and the capa- 
bility of building It in charge." Smith said 
"It hasn't been that way for len years " 

Now that there is one league that fully 
represents beach volleyball, the rules are 
easier to understand than they were previ- 
ously St)mc of the rules in the new AVP 
break from the traditional stvie of voliey- 
ball 

For example, the AVP uses "rally" scor- 
ing, which means that every mistake results 
in a point scored for one of the teams This 
IS a sticking point for traditionalist players 
who prefer the old "sideH>ut" style of scor- 
ing, where the team has to be serving m 
order to score points Another change is 
the decrease in C4>urt size 

Some of the players, like. Smith, are not 
yet sold on all the rule changes, particularly 
the scoring changes Yet they seem willing 
to accept the rules if it helps promote their 
spt>rt to a wider audience 

"I know that people who know the game 
and play the game and are used to the okJ 
system don't like the changes. " Smith said 




S«el 



n 



MIM I" •<( >SV'lJMv Bum ^.fmof slaTf 

VolleytMll player Sif^ SmMh digs a ball at the Side Out 
AVP Hermosa Beach Men's Open earlier this month. 



Gravity is for wimps 




MW ►•I! I T\f 



Dallas native Randy Marino wins the In-line Skate Championships in Hermosa Beach by becoming 
the first in-line skater to successfully complete the infamous 20-foot-high loop 



Players past and present 
meet at Easton Stadium 



SOFTBALL Bmin afh1f*fes 
face ofT against alumni in 
summertime competition 



Incoming Bruins strut their stuff 



By 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

The Bruins of the past and the 
Bruins of the present met on June 17 
at Easton Stadium lor a softball exhi- 
bition doubleheader. then moved on 
in different directions for the sum- 
mer. 

f-or the UCLA players of the pre- 
sent, a two-month tour as part of 
Team USA is in order For the 
UCLA players of the past, a summer- 
long excursion with the Women's 
Pro Softball League Tour of 
Fastpitch Champions calls them 

But on one long, hot summer day. 
these two entities collided 

College players have the opportu- 
nity to make softball a 12-month 
thing. For them, there is no such 
thing as a break, and they reliiih every 



moment of it 

"It never ends," said UCLA catch- 
er Slacey Nuveman "Sometimes you 
need a break We're in shape, so 
that's not an issue, but sometimes we 
get a little bumt-out from the games. 
But we're playing for Team USA. so 
It's pretty easy to get pumped up " 

On the other hand, the veterans 
who have completed their education 
at UCLA, outside of national team 
competition, have limited opportuni- 
ties to play from June through 
September 

They must train on their own dur- 
ing the long off-season and keep in 
shape for chances like the one tluu 
the WPSL offers 

"Fortunately we have the WPSL," 
said pitcher Lisa Fernandez, one of 
five I'CLA players with the Tour of 
Fastpitch Champions and currently a 
Brum assistant coach 'it's now pro- 
viding us an opportunity to play on a 
team every summer, otherwise it's 
kind of limited to the national team " 



Sc« 



10 



FOOTBALL Caiinorida 
Bowl shtjwcases talents 
ot liiliirc Pa( 10 plavers 



BvScantair 
Daily Bfuin Reporter 

As most Amerit.ins il<> on a la/\ 
afternoon r(l\ football head 
coach Boh I(>led<> sat down in front 
i>t his television On Saturday after 
noon his television turned into a 
crvstal ball 

The ball showed UCSB s Harden 
Stadium where the future stars of 



I CLA lootball played their last 
high school game 

The see(tnd ( aliflondu Bowl 
inatcheu the finest graduating high 
school talent from ( alifornia and 
I londa against each other resulting 
in .1 I "14 victorv for Florida Fvery 
player on the field is headed to a 
Division I university 

Pac-IO schcwis doled out more 
than SMM).0(K» a year in scholarships 
to '1 members ol the California 
"squad Seven of those scholarships 
were courtesy of Brum football, but 
none were given with more excite- 
ment than the free education allot- 
ted to running back Tyler Ebell 

The .^fooi-9-inch firecracker m> 



full of boundless energy and insa- 
tiable motivation that allowed him 
to rack up a national high school 
record 4,484 yards last season 
alone 

C alifornia's five-wide offense 
opened up the passing ganrtc for fea- 
tured quarterbacks David Koral 
and Matt Leinhart but closed ofl 
the running lanes and opportunities 
lor Ehdl 

"I wish they would have allowed 
me to contribute a little more.' 
Ebell said "With the offense 
focused on passing. I just had to 
make the nKMt of the opportunities 



SwPMflBMl. 



n 



UCLA in Ti 



USA 



2000 memben of UCLA ffllkkill IH 
fHKtedforTNinUSA 

Red: P/Of- Amanda Fr««4 
P - Keira Goerl 
16-TairiaMims 
C - Stacey Nuveman 
SS Natasha Watky 

Blue: 36 Toha AtiHua 
P/Of-Courtn^Oiie 

Fsrmuk) Md drtiik. fo ID 



UCLAinWrSL 



PastmembmofUOA 
WPSltourof 



linAt 



All-Stars: 3B 

IB 

P/3B-Li5a 
Go(d:P-IUciClart[ 



fStoWIMI. 



DAILY BRUIN 



SiTvihH l.h<' U< '1*A «-«*niiniinii V .siiio" IJUH 



M(»NI».\Y..IrLY2,2(K)l 



www.<iaily't»riiiri.ii(-la.f<lii 



indep<»nd<»n<H^ Day 


^^^K7^ SummfT lovin* 


I^tlrs Cor Watson 


AnitTlcan.s find (iilTenTH ways 


^^^^^ lU'ilH-AU'ii tans hralcti up th<' 


bjuri Watson is on his wav to S<'atiN' 


UMt*l<'hra(<' lh«' Fourth oj Miily. 


^^^^^ 2(N)1 War|N'<iTouron Kriday. 


al'l'T Iwin^drallril hy th«' S<mi«s. 


NEWS, PAGE S 


/^^^H^ A4E, PAGE M 


SPimrs. BAC K PAGE 



Anderson School predicts recession NewNCAA 

regulations 



called for by 




POWER: FortH-asisays 

rcsiill 
in state-wide slowdown 



Forrr>er governor Pate WMsofi addressed the state's er>ergy crisis 
during his keynote speech at The Anderson School on June 28. 



By 

Daily Brum Senior Staff 

Gov. CJray Davis Hipped the 
switch of a new !^20-mcgawatt Kern 
C ounty pi>wer plant on June 2S and 
•.aid "We are taking control of our 
energy destin\ " 

But one day later and IINI mile> 
iiMhixJuthatthe UCLA .^nderst>n 
School, former governor Pete 
\^ilM>n and others warned ol pend- 
ing blackouts and recessu»n due in 
part by the energy crisis 

I ( LA s ti»p business ,inaly.sts 
released their findings June 2X. cit- 
ing the energy crisis as a catalyst lor 
a probable stale-wide recession 

The Anderson School \ 
( alifornui tconomic Korecust. 
authored by L'CLA senior ecoiuv 
niist Tom Lieser. predicted a 
decline m the growth rale oi the 
gross stale pnnluct and a state-wide 
rise in unemployment The 
Anderson repi>rt has historically 
been one of the most accurate ec<>- 
nomic forecasts in the Western 
United Slates 

Though the entire state is expect- 
ed to enter into a recession, ihe 
forecast expects Los Angeles won't 



be hit as hard as Northern 
(alilbrnia. piirtially because two of 
L A.'s largest industries aer«v 
space and entertainment - are 
cxpecled to fare relaii\el> well in 
the next couple years The number 
of |obs m both industries is expect- 
ed to increase after a brief decline 

Meanwhile. Ba> Area cities eciv 
nomically dependent on dot-com 
businesses may be less fortunate, 
mcluding San Jose, where 14 tKH) 
people have lost jobs since 2(MKl 

hollowing Lieser s presentation. 
UCLA senu)r eci>nomist 

Christopher Thornherg and 
Michael Zenker, director o'. the 
C ambridge LnergN Research 
Associates, presented a report 
oflcring two wa>s CaJifornia can 
iUtack the energy crisis 

One way is to charge consumers 
more now lor energy, and the other 
Is lo have the stale lake charge and 
defer energy ct>sts 

Thornberg said the worst-case 
>cenario' of 1 12 hours of blackouts 
this summer could be reduced to 12 
hours if the market is allowed to run 
Us ciiurse. because consumers will 
be inclined to use less energy it 
retail prices are kept high 

But others said the state could 
experience slower growth rales in 
the near future with the first option 
According to Lieser's report, the 

See 1MM6V, page ft 



■ • 



Engfish language program helps hospital workers 



Instruction in 
grammar, medical terms 
aids participants in work 



By^MmMn 

Daily Brum Contributor 

An English as a Second Language 
program for former UCLA laundry 
facility workers culminates in a grad- 
luition ceremony Friday for those 
who have completed the yearlong 
program 

Twelve of the workers, now all 
UCLA Medical Center employees, 
wiH receive certificates for complei- 



mg the program and achieving a satis- 
factory level of English language 
skills 

"I love my clas.ses. and it has 
helped me to improve my English 
since I knew very little when I start- 
ed." said Carmen Paredes. a patient 
escort "I practice my English with 
the patients and with the other work- 
ers " 

After shutting down the laundry 
lacihty last July lo reduce hmpital 
costs, the university started using 
temporary, subcontracted workers 
for laundry work This left laundry 
workers with uncertain futures, said 
Jim Jusiiss. manager of employee 
relations and workers compcnsa- 



For those who moved from their 
jobs at the laundr\ facility to the 
Medical Center. Justiss said the 
change in environment made many 
workers nervous 

"The new setting was a big change 
for them." he said ""The lobs require 
them to be more active and commu- 
nicative with the hospital staff while 
the laundry facility was a more shel- 
tered environment where they did not 
interact much with others ' 

The ESL courses, which ran three 
times' a week for two hours, teaches 
basic English vtxrabulary and gram- 
mar as well as technical terms used in 
the hospital 



"The workers need lt» know names 
of liKations. medical equipment, 
chemicals they may handle, as well as 
the meaning of the signs posted 
around the Medical Center. " said 
Leticia Florcs. the hospital's inter- 
preter and the pri>gram instructor 

For many of the workers, the prcv 
gram provided a return lo the clasv 
rtK)m after many years 

Minelia Tell(\ who worked in the 
laundry facility for 22 years and now 
works as a catering services employ- 
ee, said she joined the program to 
help her qualify for a better position 
in the hospital 

See HiFlflfRS, pape 7 



UCLA researches breast cancer drug 



TEST: Herreptin may raise 
life expectancy of patients; 
5,000 women to participate 



niKrTMV NGO«illy tram tonor taH 



Mty Bfuin Staff 

UCLA IS leading the way m developing 
■ drug that has the potential to increase the 
life expectancy of some breast cancer 
patients 

Herceptin will be used in a clinical trial 
headed by the UCLA Jonsson 
Comprehensive Cancer Center The study 



extends to about 600 institutions on five 
continents 

Physicians arc seeking more than ^.00() 
women with early-stage breast cancer lo 
participate in the study, which began June 
20. according to Jonsson Center 
spokesperson Kambra McConnel 

Dr Dennis Slamon. director of the 
Revlon/UCLA Women's Cancer 
Research Program, hopes to investigate 
the effects of Herceptin m women with 
aggressive breast cancer that has not yet 
metastasized, or spread to other parts of 
the body 




Pharmacy technician Jainw C>ticB tests a new drug 
that has been proven to ¥iork well with chemotherapy 



comiTussion 

SPORTS: Report rritici/cs 
commercialism, low rate 
of graduation of athletes 



By Scan Sdnilti 

. Daily Brum Senior Staff 

If the NC AA endorses ftcfmt- 
mendations of a recent report 
sch«M)ls will be required to graduate 
50 percent M their players h\ 2<M)'' 
In order lo play in the postseason, 
coaches must forfeit lucraiive 
endorseinent contracts and the asstv 
cuition will have lo distribute re\- 
enue based on academic perfor- 
mance, among other changes 

Ten years after the knight 
Foundation Commission on 
Intercollegiate Athletics released its 
report condemning the commercial- 
ization of college athletics, the com- 
mission reconvened and relea.sed its 
latest opine regarding the current 
state of the NCAA on June 26 

Many members of the commiv 
sion agree the prognosis is alarming- 
ly discouraging With recommenda- 
tions as drastic as they were succinct. 
the report focused on the escalating 
commercialism of college sports and 
the free fall of athletes graduation 
rales. particularK among lootball 
and men s basketball players 

"This corruption in athletics is a 
cancer, u blemish on the academic 
institutions as a whole." said former 
Knight Fifundation President Creed 
Black 

According to the most recent 
NC AA graduation rale reports. 
UCLA would qualify for postseason 
play in both sports even if the recom- 
mendations by the commission were 
to be enacted as NC AA regulations 
retroactively 

L'CLA officials, the athletic 
department and men s basketball 
head coach Steve Lavin were 
unavailable for comment or had n«it 
yet read the Knight Commission, 
and therefore declined to comment 
on the commission 

Other recommendations by the 
12-year-old. 2H-membcr Knight 
Commission, made up of presidents 
from universities, televisu>n net- 
works and the I nited States 
Olympic committee, include bring- 
ing coaches salaries in line with 
those ol profess«>rs and prtihtbiimg 
uniforms from bearing ct>rporale 
logos 



How do th» Pac-10 
hoMuptolhs 
MMliny? Sm tMCk 



Mcmddv. Jul\ 2, '2(HII 



Daily Brum News 



UCLA has promising job market for LGBT scholars 



DEGREE: I iiiNcrsitN is 
t'\(('()li(>n lo studies that 
r<'|MHl \ow (»|)()(>rtiiniti<'> 



6v Kevin L«e 

Ddily brum Contributor 

Dopik- ,t report lli.i! s.nil the inb 
iT\>trki.M lor lesbian Ci.n. Bi>c\u.il .mil 
Fr.inNgctnJcr scholars is noi promiMnj; 
st>nif sas those with a docloralc arc 
larinj: well in lindin^ icnurc-track 
icachini: positions at I (LA . 

I he American Historical 

Association released a stud\ in Ma\ 
titled C ommittee on Lesbian and Cia\ 
Misior\ Surve> on LdBLQ Histor\ 
( areers which concluded that L^'BI 
M.holar> nu>stl\ lhi>se with a d(K'ti>r- 



ale in histor\ do not have a high suc- 
cess rale an t'lndini! tenure-track poM- 
iioiiv despite risinjj pt>pulari(\ in 
L( iB 1 colleue courses across the I S 
But the status of I (iBI studies at 

I ( I A doc•^ not rellect the report 

I ( I A Is a iireal place lor students 
and protess»)rs involved in LCiBl stud- 
ies " said James Schull/ director ol the 

I I »B 1 projirani at I ( L A The num- 
ber ol distinguished lacultv is grim- 
ing ' 

I CLA onl\ oilers an undergradu 
ate mmor in L(iBl studies Those pur- 
suing a doctorate relating to LCiBl 
studies come trom ditlerent depart- 
ments, including hislor>. lilm. 
women s studies and the health sci- 
ences According lo Schullz. UCLA 
h.is verv tew hislnrv students concen- 
trating in l.CiBT studies 



The report bv the AHA surveyed 44 
siudeniA with a doctorate in LCiB'l 
studies Irom 2** universities within the 
I S and ( anadu. among them 
I '( LA About hall ol the respondents 
lound tenure-track or equivalent p<>si- 
tions. and ol those, more than halt 
received their positions outride the 
I S 

()n the whole. SchullJ' said he divs 
not se^ the LCiBT tenure-track |ob 
market as being verv ditVereni Irom 
other subjects 

■Job prospects lor anv tenure-track 
positions are dreadful lo start with. 
Schult/ said But Irom mv own expe- 
rience. LGBT studies positions arc mil 
anv more difTicult lo get than other 
departments ■ 

Marc Stem, author ol the rep«)rt. 
conducted the studv because ol the dil- 




COiVliVIUi-frj'Y BlilEFG 



UCLA chancellor 
celebrates big day 

Chancellor Albert Carnesale cele- 
brated his 65th birthdiiv Monday 

His more modest beginnings origi- 
nate in Bronx. New Vbrk where he 
grew up in a tenement 

I went tt> pubic schiH)ls in New 
York k-12.' ( arnesale once said I 
wasn I a serious student, nonetheless. I 
got a prettv giHKl educatu'n ' 

C arnesiile en|t>vs opera and classical 
nnisii. Brum athletics and reading 

Bui his commitments have not 
alwavs rested solelv wiih I CLA The 
Last ( oast engineer has been .in advis- 
er on nuclear weapons policv to six 
I S presidents and is a lormer 
Harvard chancellor 

Thi>ugh he savs he still has trouble 
telling which side ol Li»s Angeles the 
iKean is on. the weather and atmi>v 
phere at I (LA have kept him here 

He alsii said once that students seem 
ti> be intrigued bv his relative absence 
ol a clear career path but summarizes 
It in his tingle theorv 

"I describe mv tingle theory ol 
career planning, which is. Do whatev- 
er makes you tingle. ' he siiid 

Scientists limit 
gene copying 

Belorc each di\ isum. cells duplicate 
himdreds olten thousands otONA 
-nippc'- Irv'iii .•.uli ^hMmosiiiiie Bui 
' .uv, Miippe' L'ol^ i-'pievi tvMcc.the 

vi.iiiiini'j! veil- vmI! i;ei l,iult\ m-.iriiv- 
'i.'ii- .Ilk! m,i\ si.ir! ,1 buildup ol errorv 
\ny ^.11' >..iiiM- v.uKe; gener.iiionv 

(K'IKC 

s.. i^-ii'sN .1' llic I iinei.silv ol 
( .iliioiMi.i San 1 r.incisCK h.ive deci- 
phered ilk- loriL'-pu/zlinj; piocesN h\ 
vihich euT\ cell reguiarlv averts these 
iLmuer- bv shutting diUMi the gene 
copviiiL' process a> siion .is one com 
plete copy Is m.idc 

Ihc tliscoverv published in the |i>ur 
li.il Saline iinoKes .i l.ni-sale svsteiu 
it .'verlappme controls reiiiiinnt that 
ihu-i.' scp.ii.ilc cheniK.il privesses be 



reversed before the genes can be rc- 
copied - a highly unlikely series of 
events, and therefore a near-perleci 
protection 

The finding was made by studying 
the cell cycle in common brewers 
yeast While some details may difTer m 
humans, the basic pattern of overlap- 
ping controls and the strategies used to 
carry them out are expected to be simi- 
lar, researchers say 

"We eventually demtwstraled that 
not i>nc or iwo. but at least three dis- 
linci controls have to be turned oil 
simultaneously lor cells to start repli- 
cating again This is unlikely to happen 
bv accident, so this muhi-layered pnv 
lection is virtuallv lail-sale " said 
Joachim Li I 'CSf assistant professor 
of microbiology and immunoU>gy and 
senun author on the paper 

While multiple overlapping path- 
ways are not thought lo be an uncom- 
mon siileguard. lew such systems have 
been dcarlv described. Li s;iid 

UC project aims to 
reduce wildfires 

The liniversity of California 
CiHiperalive Extension is l(H)king lor 
owners ol small forested parcels in the 
northern Sierra Nevada lo help reduce 
wildflre-caused home loss 

' N^ildland fires are becoming 
mcreasinglv common as more people 
move lo rur.il areas.' said Michae! IX- 
l.asaiiv I ( ( ooperative Lxiension 
n.iUir.il rev>urces adviser loi I'lunias 
and Sierr.i counties One ol the mt>st 
important things we can do lo alleviate 
the wildfire risk is to reduce excessive 
tuel accumul.ilions in what is known .is 
the wildliind-iirban interlace 

In coopiT.it ion with the I S forest 
Service 1 ( ( iHiper.iiive I xlension is 
I. lunching ,i seven-county demonstra- 
tion protect lh.it will show how to 
mechanic. illv ihm stands of small trees 
with small-scale logging equipment 

FligibledemonstralM>n sHeM)l three 
.icres or less must be l.iirlv llai .iiul 
located in Butle. Nevada. Placet 
Plum.is Shasl.i Sierra oi N uba coun- 
ties 1 .indowners ami loggers will be 



shown how dense groves of small trees 
can be thinned using small tractors 
with specialized attachments for cut- 
ting and moving the trees The small 
trees that are removed may also be 
milled for lumber or posts 

"To my knowledge equipment such 
as this IS not currently being used in this 
manner in Northern California."' De 
Lasaux said in addition to demonstrat- 
ing the potential of this small equip- 
ment, the project will examine econt)m- 
ic and environmental considerations 

Doctors dose holes» 
reduce strokes 

Heart disca.se. hypertension, high 
cholesterol and cigarette smoking are 
wcHI-km>wn risk factors associated with 
stroke a potentially fatal condition in 
which bUKtd fli»w to the brain is div 
rupted But sometimes strokes strike 
people without warning 

These strokes of mystenous origin, 
known as cryptogenic siri>kes. can 
occur in people with a small hole 
between the upper chambers of the 
heart Insuchcases. a bltxid dot passes 
through the hok; ~ called a patent fora- 
men ovale - then makes its way to the 
brain and causes a stroke 

To prevent this from iK'curring. 
physicians at UCLA Medical Center 
recently began performing a procedure 
to permanentlv close- PfOs. which are 
present in aK>ui 10 percent oi adults 
Because many people with such holes 
don I h.ive strokes, this procedure is 
i)nly perlormed on those with a Pl( ) 
who have experience one or more 
cry pi(»genic strokes 

Interventional cardiologists close 
PI ( )s without surgerv by using a small 
w ire-.ind-fabric implant known .is .i 
( ardioSLAL Ihe one-hour privedure 
involves placing the fmplant inside a 
special catheter and using medical 
imaging equipment to help guide the 
ilev ice from an artery in the groin area 
up to the heart lypically p;ttienls are 
observed overnight and discharged the 
lollowingday 

Reports from Daily Brum staff and wire 
services 









Vrp«|r I' li>r mon inlnmiJIinr 




\'ieu point 


10 


Arts & Entertainment 


14 


Bruin Movie Guide 


I? 


Cbssifieds 


^9 


Crossword Puzzie 


21 : 



ficullv he faced in finding a tenure- 
track position 

As I wa.s searching. I made a 
promise lo myself thai once I did land 
a tenure-track job. I would do a study 
on lob success rate trends lor IXiBT 
scholars." said Slein. a prolcsstir at 
Y ork I iniversity in ( anada 

One reast»n Stem gives for the low 
rate ol L(»B'I tenure-track pi>sitions is 
thai many academic hisiorv depart- 
ments think III LCiBI studies as 1(h> 
narrow a subject 

"Many hisiorv review boards think 
that L(iBT scholars have tm) concen- 
traitd a field and do not tuive a broad 
enough knowledge about history in 
general." he said 

Bui Stem says LCiBI .scholars have 
a ciMnprehensive kn«)wledge of hislory. 
because one cannot studv an LCjBT 



population wtthtuu also delving into 
aspects o\ the city that are not LCJBl- 
related 

William keyJor. director of the hiv 
tory department at Boston liniversity. 
said that history departments some- 
times dt)n I have a need for prt)fes.sors 
lipeciali/ing in a particular subject He 
noted that the report showed LCiBI 
dtHTlorales now receive tenure-track 
jobs \5 times more often than they did 
in the 1980s 

°ll all depends on how the universi- 
ty IS organi/ed. " Keylor said 

Schuh/ said it is unreasonable to 
consider any one diK'toral field of 
study as being too concentrated 

"Most Ph D dissertations arc 
extremely specific and obscure." 
Schult/ said "C ailing any one disserta- 
tion t(M) narrow would be absurd " 



DAILY BRUIN 



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Media DirKtorA'v:w.«ir 



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(3101 US-VaM, hnp://www.«laMybnMn.uda.e«lu, fan (310) 3O*-O9O0 



Die^o Seglin was misidentified as Oijanna SmotheriMn in "Speaks Out" 
(Mewsjuof 11) 

Th« artid« "ROTC proqram offers adventure, real life experietKe" (News, 
J«me 11), should have said the the 1 999 bombing of a Chinese embassy 
occurred in Belgrade, in the former Republic of Yugoslavia. 

Leonard Armatos nante was misspelled in the article "League sets beach 
volleyball for mainstream play" (Sports, June 2S). 

Caridad Lezcano s name was misspelled in "Speaks Out" (Sports, June 25). 



Editorial 



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Daily Brum 



Monday, July 2. 2001 3 



Bombs 



bmting 






Watching fireworks is a 

traaition that adds a spark 

of color and brilliance to 

Fourth of July celebration 




A fireworks display lights up the sky at an early Fourth of July celebration at Santa Monica 
Community College on June 30. 



Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

In the ciMil ol twilight on Inciependence 
Day l%7. Julian Jimene/ eagerly avsuittxl 
nightfall at Los Angeles City Park near his 
childhtMxl home, anticipating the evening > 
fireworks .sho>* 

Like man\ other Americans, watching 
the red. white and blue tlames illuminating 
the sky had become an annual tradition tor 
Jimenez, but it would also become much 




A woman holds a baby and looks up in awe 
as multicolored streams of fire ascerKl 500 
feet into the air. 



more 

"I loved this so much I said to myself, 
i've gotta get my license so I can do my 
own fireworks sh<w.' he said 

Since making that pledge. Jimenc? h<is 
wowed the audience with shows at the Rt)se 
Bowl. Magic Mountain and the l'^M6 
Olympics in .Atlanta 

"The best leeling is that ol the cheers ol 
the crowd the satislaction." Jimenez said 

He also said it s tulfilling to have a Haw- 
less performance - to have it work without 
any kind ol interruption or lailure ' 

While many venture out to i|ppreciatc 
the bursts ol color, lew reali/e that fire- 
works sht>ws start long before the scheduled 
iKcasion Ihe fourth ol July fireuorks 
show put on by Pyrotechnic Spectaculars ai 
the Queen Mary in Li>ng Beach starts five 
or Nix months prior lo the date. Jimenez 
said 

.After hiring tugboats to pull a barge 
from which the fireworks will be launched 
into the Harbor at least l.(HM) feet away 
from the stern of the Queen Mary. choret>g- 
raphers put the fireworks to music and 
other employees gather materials for the 
show, he explained 

Kiftecn people begin setting up thrtnit^ 
four days in advance. Jimenez said ()n the 
night of the pertbrmance. a team of licensed 
pyrotechnic operators will detonate more 
than l.(MH) shells 

The shells are ignited through an electric 
match, which simultaneously lights both the 
lifting charge, which thrusts the shell into 
the air at a rate of KM) feet per second and 
the timing fuse, which burns for about five 
seconds before detonating the rest nf the 
pyrotechnic material This causes the evfAo- 
sion of color and n«)ise that fireworks are 
known for 



Jimenez, who has l aunc h e d fireworks for 
yZ years, said the experience is exhilarating 

"its like being on a stage in a major the- 
ater There s a big crowd, elbou to elbow. 
It)- lo 1 5-lcet deep When the show is over, 
they are whiK»pmg and hollering and having 
a great time." he said 

The fireworks show at the Queen Mary 
attracts half a million people each year. 
Jimenez s4iid 

In addition to professitmal fireworks 
shows, many I i>urth ol July celebrants set 
off then own fireworks Ihough consumer 
fireworks have been banned in many 
C alilornia communities, they can be legally 
sold in 224 cities, counties and fire districts 
between noon on June 2S and ni>on i>n July 
6 

But in Westwood and many neighbi>ring 
communities, all fireworks arc illegal 

"We don't have problems on July 4 on 
the campus area." said Nancy (ireenstein. 
director of community services for universi- 
ty police "(MTicers will be tnit discouraging 
people frtim using firecrackers as they are 
illegal and dangerous ' 

Merc possession of illegal fireworks, 
such as M-HOs. bottleriK-kets and firecrack- 
ers can lead lo three years of inlormal pri>- 
bation and five days in jail 

Robert C\H)ver. 19, said he opposes such 
laws, adding that he has enioyed personal 
fireworks shows hosted by multiple tamilies 
at bkxrk p;irties throughout his lite 

The louder, the belter, he said (inner 
recommends the Vmch titanium salute. " 
which he said is so loud that once it 
explodes, car alarms up to 2 miles away will 
gi> oil 

Along with fireworks, many people will 
host barbecues lor family and friends 

hourth-\ear ( hicana o studies student 



Fireworks shows 



UCLA 



All fireworks sho)^ take place on the 4th of 
July and last approximately 20 minutes. 

Culver City 

Culver City High ScfKX)l 
4401 Elenda St. 
Gates open at 5 p.m. 
Admission donation 
requested 

Marina Del Ray 

Show starts at 9 p.m. 
Best seen from the TJgi' 
Fishermans Village 
Admission Free 

Long Beach 

Queen Mary 

Show starts at 9 p.m. 

Regular Admission Free 

(fireworks can be seen 

across the harbor) 

Queen Mary admission: $19 

Parking $10 



Steven (ortez has de\ eloped a fine-tuned 
method for cooking the tastiest meal 

1 gel the best meal from East Los 
.Angeles There's a couple ( meat markets) m 
particular that prepare the meat by putting 
a variety o\ spites orange juice, lemon, a 




Spectators 
with lawn 
chairs and 
blankets set 
up camp on 
the football 
field of Santa 
Monica 
Community 
College on 
June 30, hop- 
ing to get a 
good view of 
the fireworks 
display 
People 

enjoyed food, 
music and 
good conver 
sation as they 
waited for the 
show to 
begin. 



4 - \l<Mitld\ liih 2 2iH>\ 



l)<iii\ Kruiii Nrwh 



STATE & LOCAL 



Study shows off-kilter 
earthquake fault lines 



Latino politicians rejoke at census data 



RESEARCH: Asymmetn 
olnioNemenl is related 
lo ditTerenl teriiperatiires 



By 

The Associated Press 

A new compuicr mi>dd suggests 
tha( st»mc earihquakc faults move 
Dtl-kiltcr and one Nidc receives 
most ol the damaginj! toll trom a 
temblor 

"One side ma\ become ver\ 
rigid and move hardi\ at all. while 
the other side might mo\e quite a 
lot, Kevin I* f uriong prtHessor ol 
geosciences at PennsvKania State 
I niversiiv said June 2*' 

it lurther sludv supports that 
Movs ii i.ould revolutu)ni/e the »a> 
builders and governnieni otiicials 
cre.ite regional earthquake damage 
niiKter^ 

I Ik >iud\ b\ Peiiii Stale .ind 
I iii\etsii\ ol Miami scientists 
appear- iii the Jul\ I "^ issue ol 
(ieoph\sical Research letters 

Furlong and other scientists 
looked ai a web ol cracks called the 
f astern ( alilornia Shear /one. 
about l^ti miles east ol San 
F ranciseo. that parallels the mightv 
San \ndicas h.iull 

Iwo plates ol harths crust conu' 
together at the Ouens \ allev site on 
the ( alilornia-Nev.ida b«)rdei 

I sing about live vears ol data, 
re-earcheis created a computer 
model lor a sinke-slip lault, where 
the two sides nunc hori/ontaiiv 
past each othei 

I he lault /<ine moves ab<»ut .i 
hall -inch a vear I arlier models 
were mirror-image with the eastern 
.nut western sides moving equalK 

I he new model plugged in the 
-aine data and suggested 40 percent 
ol the -hilting took place on the 
ea-iern side 

Mosi researchers stmpiv 



assumed this asymmetrv wasn't 
possible."' hurlong said 

f urlong speculates that the dil- 
lerence m movement is related to a 
ditlerencc in temperatur'e The 
western side contains the dense 
granite ol the Sierra Nevada moun- 
tains It has less subsurface heat 
Howing through it and is colder 
than the more viscous, squishier 
rock ol the Basin and Range, the 
eastern, side that extends as far as 
Salt LakeC it>. I'tah 

A dozen miles beneath the sur- 
face, the temperature on the Sierra 
Nevada side was estimated at abt^ul 
^75 degrees and the Basin and 
Range side at I.I 12 degrees. 
I urlong sail! 

Hotter riK'k accumulates more 
strain belore an earthquake hence 
the ground movement and during 
a jolt It Is more elastic 

The rubber band is on the Basin 
and Range side and the steel bar is 
on the Sierra \evada side." 
|- urlong said 

Such asvmmetrv alst> was sug- 
gested b\ satellite studies ol a 1'*'^'' 
earthquake in Tibet. and-4here also 
has been some evidence ot asym- 
meirs in thrust laults. where the 
two sides meivc verticall>. I urlong 
said 

Ht>we\er. more studv is needed 
to conlirm the model Hurlong siiid 
researchers intend to return to the 
C alilornia lault /one this lall to 
make new observations 

The new model looks cool." 
said Ken Hudnut. a geophysicist 
with the I S Cjeological Survev in 
Pasadena This tries to model the 
Larth s actual properties Its a nice 
piece ol work I m intrigued bv 
this " 

liudnul said the model might be 
uselul in his (»un research on asym- 
metric delormations ol land that 
lollowed the JW magnitude-" I 
Hector Mine earthquake northeast 
ol I OS Angeles 



POUnCS: Being one of 
largest groups translates 
to an increase in power 

The Associdted Press 

SAN JOSE. Calrt With shouts ol 
Ariba'*" whistles and thunderous 
applause. Los Angeles mayoral candi- 
date Antonio Villaraigosa was greeted 
like a conquering hero at a gathering 
of Latino otTicials 

Though Villaraigosa lost the race to 
white candidate James Hahn. 
Hispanic ofTicials. buoyed by census 
data showing their growing numbers, 
believe that victory greater political 
power IS inevitable 

This year, census findings showed 
there were 35 .^ million Latinos m 
2(MM). or about 12 5 percent of the 
populatufn Thev now rival African 
Americans, who number between 
VVy million and ^5 4 million, as the 
country's leading minoritv group 

"It means influence, it means buy- 
ing power. It means having a greater 
voice and being aWc to have more otTi- 
cials that can represent that voice. " 
said Deborah Ortega, a city council 
member in Denver. ( olo 

Ortega was one of about '^0(1 
Latino elected officials, from cilv 
council and school board members to 
members of Congress, that attended 
this week s National AsstKialion ol 
latino Fleeted and Appointed 
Officials Education hund annual 
meeting 

At the conference, they swapped 
strategy on how to translate their 
growing numbers into political power 
bv mobilizing the immigrant vote and 
by backing "crossover" candidates 
with broad appeal in areas without 
latino majorities 

Manv were brimming with excite- 
ment generated b\ Villaraigosa s cam- 
paign, which lhe> said raised the priv 
Hie of Latino politicians and demon- 
strated Latino voters support and 
higher-than-average turnout. Latinos 




ft» AvMK mml Pwv 

Arturo Vargas speaks at a news conference flanked by San Jose 
mayor Ron Gonzalez, right, and state assemblyman i 



made up 22 percent o( the electorate 
June 5. compared to 15 percent in 

"I have no tears 1 put all my sweat 
on that battlefield" Villaraigosa said 
TliursdaN to a crowd of about 5(H) who 
greeted him with hugs, cheers and a 
standing ovation "There was an ener- 
-^y. an excitement there. th<U iiU ot ti& 
can tap into" . „ 

There are about 5.1MK) Latinos 
elected and appointed uffkiai* acmwi, 



the country, ranging from sherifls and 
school board members to mayors and 
US representatives 

Still. Latinos represent just one per- 
cent of elected olTicials in the country 
Latinos account for four percent of 
members of Congress and there arc 
just seven Latinos in elected, 
statewide offices 

On one hand, these numbers ' gen- 



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WORLD & NATION 



Dictators face widespread international opposition 




AISnCE: Milosevic handover 
is la-test sign uf politicians' 
rise in le^i responsibilit> 



lft»- A,M>«4lfHl Mir*;' 

Former Yugoslav president SMbodan Milo sgvte waves 

to workers at a car and weaF>ons factory in Kragujevac. 



By 

The Associated Press 

It's not eas\ being a ruthless ruler these 
days. 

The handover of former Yugoslav 
President SlobodiU) Mik>sevic to a I N tri- 
bunal is just the latest sign that it > getting 
harder and harder lor leaders accused of 
atrocities to avoid lacing the charges 

While former dictators like I gaiula s Idi 
.\m\x\ and Milton (^ne still live cimifort- 
abl> in exile, and current strongmen like 
Iraq s Saddam Hussein are s;ife at honK. the 
reach o\ internatumal justice is expanding 

There s been a determined etfort to end 
the cycle of impunity that ha.s been allowed 
to exist b\ not bringing pcrpetraltirs of these 
crimes tu justice. said Jonathan 
O'Donohue. assistant legal adviser at 
Amncst) International, the human rights 
group based in London 

Milosevic s case is particularl\ significant 
because he is the onh former head oi stale to 
be surrendered to a I N tribunal tu staitd 



trial on charges of committing crimes 
against humanity 

But even at national levels, judges and 
pri>seculors hiivc started going after promi- 
nent one-time leader-^ iccused ol commit- 
ting crimes somewhcic else 

^^ltness the unprecedented procecdintis 
against lormer Chilean dictator Augusio 
Pinochet, who was .irrested in Britain in 
I'HW* on a Spanish" warrant accusing him ol 
human rights abuses in ( hik- a quarter cvn- 
tur\ earlier 

Or Senegal s indictment of l't>rmeT 
(hadian dictator Hissene Habre imi charges 
of tiirture. murder and a htwt ot other crimes 
during his IW2-y<) reign 

Ot even Mexico s plan to extradite a for- 
mer .Argentine soldier. Ricardo C avaUo. to 
Spain to lace torture, kidnapping and tei- 
rorism charges stemming frotn Argentina s 
dirtv war against opptments of a militarv 
junta While thi>M.' etVorts haven I vielded 
any criminal trials, human rights advtic.iles 
sav thev represent progress 

The score is somewhat split lor Peru , 
Venezuela captured notiKious former sp\ 
chiel Viadimiro MonicsuK»s and turned hini 
over to Peruvian authorities last week to 
lace charges o{ inlluence peddling, monev 
laundering, drug trafficking, arms dealing 
and human rights violations 



But Monlesinos one-time boss, ousted 
President Alberto lujimori. has so far 
esc^iped justice Japan granted him citizen- 
ship after he fled and has refused to send him 
back to Peru, where he is accused ot corrup- 
tion, human rights v lolaiions and links to the 
paramilitarv death squad allegediv headed 
bv Moniesiiu>s V 

lX"spite such sethttcfes. inmi'itatiyi n rf jus- 
tice does seem to be nourishing Itillowmg 
the creation in the l')*HK ol the two iid hoc 
IN courts to prosecute crimes m the lor 
mer Nugitslavia and Rwanda and the i'WS 
stattrte establishing the wiirld's first perma- 
nent war crimes tribunal 

More recentlv. the cimcept uf "universal 
jurisdiction' has broken new ground with 
.individuals in third countries acpng under 
international laws that allow l(>i certain 
crimes against humanitv to be prt>scculed 
anvwhere 

Spanish Judge Baltasar Ciar/on h.is bcvn 
at the forefront, althiuigh his nu>st promi- 
nent effort failed when British Home 
Secretary Jack Straw ruled that Pinochet 
was medicallv unfit to stand trial in Spam for 
alleged abuses during his |U'^^-4<l dictator 
ship But after Pinochet returned to Chile, 
his immunitv was lifted and he is now facing 
charges ol cmcring up Ih kidnappings and 
5" homicides 



Landmarlc issues mark states now have laws against cyberstalking 

Supreme Court's term 



T: Special police units are 
equipped to deal with perpetrators 



Bush V. Gore 
among significant; many 
cases decided by 5-4 vote 



The Associaied Piess 

WASHINGTON When they 
took their seats on the first Monday in 
October, the Supreme Court justices 
faced few of the major issues that have 
charactenzed recent terms 

No big abortion cases, no emolionai 
showdown over whether gays should 
be Boy Scoots The lawyers and law 
professors who watch the court pre^ 
dieted a lackluster year 

Lnatead. the court term that con- 
cluded June 2K was defined by the efec- 
tion ca.se succinctly titled Bush v Ciorc. 
one ol the most memorable and signif- 
k:ant decisions of the court's modem 
history 

"Clearly. Bush v Gore eclipses the 
term." said Richard Lazarus, a 
Georgetown University law professor 



who runs training sessions to help 
lawyers prepare for Supreme Court 
arguments "It was such a fantastical 
couple of weeks bei'ore the court that it 
seems hard to believe that it really hap- 
pened" 

Beyond the stark history of the 
Supreme C ourt efTecttvely deciding a 
presidenltal election, the court term 
that began in October and concluded 
last week will likely be remembered for 
the startling number of cases decided 
by the bare 5-4 majority 

For the first \mc in modem memo- 
ry, or perhaps ever, the court decided 
more cases by a 5-4 vole than by a 
unanimous vote Counting the 
unsigned majority decision in Bush v 
Cjore. the court decided 26 cases by a 
5-4 outcome, while the nine members 
were wholly unanimous in 25 cases 
The court resolved an additional 1 1 
cases by 9^ or 8-0 votes, but not all juv 
tices could agree on all portions of the 
ruling 

In theorv. the court strives for una- 



BytaMCmy 

The Associated Pwss 

NEW YORK In the erfrly days ol the Internet, 
police sometimes shrugged off complaints about cytKr- 
staHcing. telling victims: "Turn off your computer" 

The response now. after numerous hair-raising 
cases. IS likely to be dtfTerent 

State af^er state has enacted cyberstalking laws in the 
past few years and set up special police units to keep 
pace with the stalkers. 

"We're getting as good as they are." said Rhonda 
Saunders, a deputy district attorney in Los Angeles 
who helped establish the city's anti-stalking team 
"They think they're clever, but that's what trips them 
up They give themselves away m a multitude of fash- 
ions" 

Califomia in W became one of the first stales to 
pass legislation targeting those who torment others via 
computer With the addition of Maine this month, 
there arc now ?*< states with laws addressing online 
stalking and harassment, according to the National 
Conference of State Legislatures 

Some recent cases 
In Los Angeles. Mark)n Pagtakhan was sentenced 
in May to five years' probation for sending hundreds of 




Thr t'.^r, HHfK) ''•>.-.■ 

Detective Sgt Tkm D. \jm, 34, sits in an office at the 
Computer Crimes Unit in East Lansing, Mich. 



WORLD ft NATION BRIEFS 



Federal agents burn 
dorm in Arkansas 

Federal agents deliberately set fire to a for- 
mer University of Arkansas dorm on June 28 
to show what can happen without sprinkler 
systems 

"You hear time after time of college stu- 
dents dying in fires." said Dan Madrzykowski. 
a fire protection engineer with the National 
institute of Standards and Technology "It is a 
tragic thing that we're losing them to unwant- 
ed and unnecessary fires" 

At least 24 people have died m college fires 
smce 1990 

Dropping a burning match into a waste ba.s- 
ket. NIST engineers started a fire that set off a 
fire alarm in 25 seconds and would have trig- 
gered a sprinkler system withm two minutes. 
Madrzykowski said 

Without a sprinkler system, the room was 
consumed in a matter of minutes gla.ss burst 
from windows and fell unto the green grass 



below Senst)rs placed m the room 
before the fire showed that it quick- 
ly consumed the room's oxygen 

Earlier in the week, the group 
experimented in a room with a sprinkler 
system and a closed door The fire there was 
contained to a small corner of the rt>om. burn- 
ing a corner of the mattress but leaving a 
poster, a stulTed blue bear and books 
untouched 

Researcher stopped 
from cloning humans 

WASHINGTON A researcher who had 
been preparing to work on human cloning has 
agreed not to attempt an experiment or 
research until the legality of the effort is deter- 
mined, the ViyoA and Drug Administration 
reported 

FDA spokesman Lawrence Bachorik said 
Friday that his agency has inspected a lab set 
up by Bngittc Boisselier m an effort ti^ attempt 




human cloning 

She signed a statement commit- 
ting not to attempt human cloning 
nor to do research using human eggs 
until the legalit> of human cloning is 
determined. Bachorik said 

Lawmakers have been preparing legislation 
to outlaw human cloning In the meantime. 
FDA has insisted that no experiments can go 
forward without its approval 

That hasn t discouraged a religious organi- 
zation called the Raelian Movement, which 
argues that life on Earth was created b\ 
extraterrestrial scientists 

Its leader. Rael. starlet^ a lab directed b\ 
Boisselier - where he vowed to clone a human 
some%»^re m the United Stales 

United States will hold 
Afighanistan responsible 

The United Stales warned Afghanistan on 
June 2'^ that the Taliban leadership would 



bear responsibility for an\ attack on 
American targets by Saudi militant Osama 
bin Laden, the l' S Embassv reported 

In a meeting with the Taliban's ambav 
sador. Abdul Salam Zaeef. William Milam. 
the US ambassador to Pakistan, expres.scd 
US concern over possible assaults b\ bin 
Laden on US targets, and warned it wc)uld 
blame the Taliban 

Bin Laden has been accused b> 
Washington in connection with attacks on 
several US targets, including the deadK 
bombings of two US embassies in Alrica 

The Taliban has given assurances that the 
Saudi exile won't be allt>wed to plan hostile 
attacks while living in Afghanistan as its 
guest 

Last month, the State Department issued 
an alert saying American citi/ens ma\ be the 
target of a terrorist threat from extremist 
groups with links to bin Laden and his .Al- 
Qaida organization 

Compiled from Daily Brum wire reports. 



Monday. July 2. 2(N) I 



Daity Brum 



KNIGHT 

From pagp 1 

Ihi^ curruplioii m athlctiCN i> a 
*..(iKi.'t .1 hlL•I1ll^h i>ii the acaJcnuL 
in>liluiiiinN .!■> .1 vvhv)lc. Black saul 

Black, v^hi' iv line o\ the current 
ciiiimii>MiitK-i ^ .111 the p.iiifl, pointed 
i>ui ihai it the reci>iiitiiend.ition> iii 
thi> ^e.ii ^ report liad heeti en.icled 
prioi u I. in! ve.if iieithei team in the 
chILl'l- !.>.>ih.ill- ehaiiipionNhip 
wiHiiil h.'.^e been cliuihle loi the 
p, isiM.Ms>'n [loi uiHiKt h.ill ol ihi> 
NL-.iM'ii ~ I iite i iL'ht leatii> lii>m tlte 
men > h.i^kelball l.iurnameiil 

• >; iIk' '•-• umiii'- III ihi> \c.ii ^ 
\( \ \ ! 'iHD.inieni ^e\ell le.mi^ 
li.ij ,1 'i-pei>eiu L'ra<.tu.iiuiii rale (ol 
\liK.it: Xmeri^aii pl.i\ei>i. Black 
^.ikl l!K>e iiradiiation rate^ .ire 
no! .ihe') .III Mu I he\ .irc .i ua\ ot 
hlc 

Ih'UL'f; ilu co^nnll^Mon made 
revt'niiiuiki.iiioiis .i^ .i whole, mem- 
hers u.K- iioi iinaiiiiiiou^ with their 
oplnl.'ll^ \( -\A preNideni ( edrie 
|)e^lp^e\ >ipp<>sed %etlini! the arbi- 
ir.ir\ ■^ii-pereeiit i:radualii>n rale lot 
whoolv ii> niainiain post^caNon cligr- 
biliis l)enipse\. who was one ol the 
^oniniisMoner>, Naid graduation 
rates should Se based on the rale ot 
the entire student population o\' the 
particular school in question 

The \( \\ understands the 
tindiiij;^ o: ihe commission which 
are niosi iroublesome ,ire the things 
that I'lcsident l)empse> has been 
workmi: on lot the List three or lour 
vears s.nd \( A A director or pub- 
lic relations NVall> Reniro 
However the recommendation lor 
,1 s(i-pei>.ent irradiiation rate tv>qual- 
il\ lv)t postseason pla\ nia> be a line 
m the sand 

■\ccordini; to Renlrti. the 
\( AX s position Is that because dil- 
leren; schools ha\c dit'lerent mis.sion 
statements implementing an arbi- 



the Knighi 
4^ percent ot 



lrar\ number loi glwiualutn rales 
across the board woonfebe unfair to 
some athletes Thes'rc unKcrned 
thai in some cases alhlclcs would be 
held to a higher academic standard 
than the rest of that particular 
school s student KhIn 

Ihe report alleges that teams 
openK disobe\ Nt AA regutattons. 
curtailing practice time and that aca- 
demic support programs are mtend- 
a^ to maintain a player's eligibilit\ 
rather than .issisi them toward 
.itt.iining a degree 

According to 
( otiimission. onl\ 
Dnision I loot- 
ball players are 
graduating and 
onK >4 percent 
ol the men s bas- 
ketball pla\ers 
are attaining 
degrees 

Ihe coTiimis- 

sion alsti stated 

that the \( AA has begun it) reflect 
a business rather than an amateur 
organization "IntoomanN respects, 
big-lime college^ spt>ris toda\ more 
closeK resemble the commercialized 
model appropriate to protetisionai 
sports than the> do the academic 
model ■ 

An example of the commercial- 
ization ol college athletics listed in 
the K night (om mission include the 
I niversit\ of Michigan's latest 
seven->car contract with Nike, 
which IS to pa\ i2f> million to the 
school Multi-million-dollar con- 
tracts with apparel companies has 
become the nt)rm for major universi- 
ties I '('LA as well has an exclusive 
deal with Adidas tor its athletic 
apparel, which lasts through June 
200s 

Another example i>l the commer- 
cialization ot college sports cited in 
the report is the contract that the 
N( AA signed with CBS to carr> the 



Only 48 percent of 

Division I football 

players are graduating. 



men :> basketball tournament I he 
contract, which will go into etlect in 
2(K)2. gives CBS exclusive rights to 
carr\ the tt>urnament tor 1 1 years 
lor which the NC AA will be paid 
S6 2 billion dollurs. 

The Knight Commission also 
opposes the seven- and eight-figure 
contracts being paid to head coaches 
in the collegiate ranks 

"Coaches are receiving four, live 
times the salary of college presi- 
dents." Black said "Its obscene that 
the coaches are making that much 
monev " 

"Outside contracts lor shoes and 
such should go 
^_^^_i____ to the universi- 
ties, not the 
coaches If the> 
want to go pro. 
lei them " 

Black cited 
basketball 

coach Rick 

Pitino s recent 

contract with the 

Louisville and his 

deals as an 



eight-figure 
Iniversits of 
many endorsement 
example 

it IS The Knight Commission s 
behet that the school's reputation is 
what allows the coaches to receive 
lucrative on<ampus endorsements, 
and that the monev should therefore 
be negotiated ihrougTi^the school 
However, marquee college coaches 
take umbrage to that claim 

"There s some truth to that, how- 
ever do the professors in your 
Anderson School negotiate their 
consulting contracts through the 
Lnivcrsity''" asked Stanford men s 
basketball head coach Mike 
Mi>ntgomer> Top-notch people 
are paid extraordinary amounts lor 
their services I don't think you can 
treat coaches diflerently than nor- 
mal professors ■' 

Montgomerv. whose Cardinal 
team is the unl\ basketball team in 



the Pat- 10 with a KMKpercent gradu- 
ation rate for the four-year period 
used in the most current NC AA 
report, is against setting an arbitrarv 
graduation rale lor postseason eligi- 
bilit> He said an institution s athlet- 
ic department should represent the 
student body 

"Theiie kids are at a school. 
because thev fit that schot)!." 
Montgomerv said 'Otherwise, what 
you have is athletes lor hire, which it 
specificalK what s going on 

"You're bringing in athletes who 
are isolated from the rest of the stu- 
dent bod\ as a whole, because the> 
don t lit That is why you see some of 
the problems that you see. and it is 
wh> you see a lot of the kids not 
graduating " 

In the wake ol the first commis- 
sion b> the Knight Foundation . 
which holds no formal authorit>. 
more than half of the recommenda- 
tions of the Knight Commission 
were endorsed by the NCAA 
However, the recommendations 
made in this report were more 
extreme than its predecessor, and 
the commission is expecting the 
report to trigger more discussions 
than actual change 

'There's a number ol recommen- 
dations that say the right thing but 
are going to be very difficuh to 
implement." said former linited 
Stales Olympics executive director 
and current commissioner Richard 
Schultz I think most of the com- 
missioners felt we had to make the 
recommendations and that hopeful- 
l> the schools will have the courage 
to follow these.'" 

Now thai the report has been 
released to the public, the ball is in 
the hands of the NCAA and the col- 
lege presidents to steer the directK>n 
of college athletics If they accept the 
recommended revisions, the reper- 
cussions will greatly alter the land- 
scape of college athkttcs. 



ENERGY 

FrofTipagel 

2001 rate ol growth will be 2 percent 
if the slate takes charge, but only 1.6 
percent if the market is left to take its 
own course 

: During the day. Wilson appeared 
as the keynote speaker prior to the 
unveiling of the forecast 

.Now director of the Pacific 
Capital Group. Wilson said 
California can expect at least 100 
hours of blackouts this summer, 
because cnergv supply won't meet 
demand 

: The former governor defended his 
signing of the 19% Assembly Bill 
l«90. which deregulated the 
California energy market, and ciled 
warmer summers and constraints on 
natural gas supply as contributing to 
the decline in energy surplus that 
existed in the mid-1990s. He also crit- 
icized the Davis administration's 
policy, charging that they had not 
moved quickly eni>ugh when there 
were clear signs of an energy prob- 
lem 

.V "The reason we will sutler power 
Mackouts this summer is because the 
Davis administration has, by inac- 
tion, allowed a problem to become a 
crisis. " he said 

With the threat of rolling black- 
outs, each University of California 
campus has established an energy 
emergency plan 

But according to the LIC Office of 
Strategic Planning. UCLA is 
immune from rolling blackouts, 
because the university is located 
within the service territory of the Los 
Angeles Department of Water and 
Power, which has stated that it has 
enough energy on reserve to supply 
Its customers' demands. 
. Davis, who has criticized the 



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Monday July 2. '2(K11 




Former UCLA latmdry facilities employee CamMfi P»fd« s listens to her instructof, 
Laticia Flercs, «vho teaches grammar to her English as a Second Language class. 



EMPLOYEES 

From page 1 

I i)nl> vkcni to elemcniarv schtniL 
and I qui! In work and to raise m\ 
children.' lelii) said I like the 
opfK>rtunit> I have to stud\ hnglish. 
and I hope U< lake other classes that 
will help me gel ttther jobs 

Participants ol the program wDrk 
in various departments withm the 
Medical (enter Some work as 
patient escorts, others in catering, 
environmental services and house- 
keeping. 

fcmployees received permissu)n 
trom their supervisors to take lime 
ofl lor instruction while slill receiv- 
ing pa>. Ju.sliss said 

Martha (ion/ale/, a housekeep- 
ing departmenl empl»>vee. said the 
program requires a lot ol efTort and 
commitmenl. but it is worthwhile 
because ol the service it provides 

"I try to lake advantage ot the 
prt>gram I attend everv session. I do 
my homework and I am ver> grateful 
to UCLA lor giving me this opportu- 
nity." Gonzalez said 



ENERGY 

from page % ■ 

Wilsim administration s energy policy, locused on 
the present when making remarks alter the Kern 
power plant called the Sunrise Power Project - 
began operating 

It s clean, it's elTicient and ii wa> buill in 
record lime." Davis said ol the plant 

Construction ol the plant began in IX'cemher 
2(KK) with crews working 18-hour days, six days a 
week Sunri.se is the first major power plant to 
come un hne in C'aliturnia since I9KK. according 
l«) the governors ofllce 

Ihe plant, jointly owned by t.dison Mission 
Energy and Texaco Power and Ciasification. will 
sell energy to Cahrornia and is eligible lor pay- 
ments from the state, which has provided financial 
incentives lor private companies to build power 
plants 

A tew days after the plant opened. Davis com- 
mended California consumers on July I for 
decreasing their energy consumption by 12 per- 
cent compared to last June 

"Conservation di>es make a dilTerencc." the 
governor said in a statement "But we cannot be 
complacent every kilowatt saved is money we 
keep m Cahfornia and out i^yi the pockets of the 
out-t>f-state consumer " 



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:^'>lK• >'i thi- New { iipl.md Journal <>t Mcdicmt. 
>h<>vMti>j III. 11 ittc diiii: in comhin.itmn with 
thcmoihfi.ipv. iiiiici^i.'- suiAiv.il i.itc U>i lh»i>.c 
wilh l,ii(.'-si,ii!i hIc.l^; t.iiKci 

A^Li'idiiiL' ii' Si.iriion ihc ..omhiiKtiion (real- 
nicni h.i- dcL! cased brtMsl Laiicci deaths b\ 2' 
pcrLcn; in vsiinicn vUioic nK'i.isialK hrcast can- 
cel 1- Ihc icsiih >i| an alteration in the HFR- 
r neii L'eiK «hieh reside^ iti luniDr eelK and 
^ause- iIk ..ukci u> -.piead \boul 2"^ to ?li per- 
i.eii! i>i u.>nieii uitti hreasi ctncer have this gene 
nnuaiivin 

B\ en mi: ller*.epiiii and chetiiotheraps at an 
earlier staec ue ht)pe \o help patients who hu\e 
the j!enelk .ilieraiion li\e loHuer and ultimately 
ha\i.' iIk hesi chance ol beinj! cured However. 
this has lo he proven lirsl in a clinical trial.' 
SlaiTioii said m a statement 

Rese.tTchers will randomly select studs partic- 
ipants and assign them to one ol three therapy 
groups which comhines Herceptin with the dil- 
tereiil ^hemotherap\ drugs ^drlamycm 



Cytoxan. Taxoicre and Platinum Researchers 
will then identity the most etlcctive combination 
ol drugs 

To be eligible tor the study, a patient's tumor 
cells must have higher levels i)! the HER-2 neu 
protein than usual Women with hreitst tumors 
I wo centimeters or larger and who have no 
Ivmph node or those with small tumors and one 
lymph node will be considered 

Slamon said all study participants will receive 
the best available standard therapies lor early- 
stage breast cancer 

Approved by the hood and Drug 
•\dministration in I99X. Herceptin is the first 
breast cancer treatment to successfully attack a 
specific genetic mutation that causes an aggrev 
sue lorm ot the disease 

It does not yield side effects of standard 
chemotherapy treatment, such as hair loss, 
latigue and low bloi»d counts 

It will take IK to .^0 months to screen about 
I5.(MI() women. Slamon said, and .^.150 eligiMe 
patients will be enrolled in the trial. 

Interejied candidates can contact the Jonsson 
Center CImical Trials toll-free hotline »t (888) 798 
0719 



LATINOS 

From page 4 

erate great pride, said Ariuro Vargah. exec- 
utive director of the NALEO Educational 
Fund "On the other side, thcv show we 
have so much more work lo gel done ' 

Much oi that work lies in cultivating 
crossover candidates that appeal to voters 
beyond the Latim) community The assticia- 
tion chose the Bay Area as the site for its 
conference to highlight San Jose Mayor 
Ron Cjonzaies success at garnering votes 
outside the Latino community, which 
accounts lor about M) percent of the city's 
population 

Latino leaders are hoping to apply the 
lessons learned in California (o North 
C aroiina. Arkansas and other areas that saw 
explosive growth in Latino populations over 
the last decade 

Korthcoming mayoral etections in New 
York and Houston promise to be high-pro- 
file tests of Latino candidates hernando 
Ferrer and Orlando Sanchez, and the assiv 
ciation plans to'makc phone calls and walk 



pi'BciiiclB in thoK iTJtics to get out the vote. 

"The Latino mayors ot large cities that 
have succeeded have that crossover 
appeal." said Michael Madrid, vice presi- 
dent of San Antonio, lexas-based political 
consuhing firm Guerra DeBcrry Coody 'It 
allows them to transcend ethnic labels" 

Dale Praine. a council member in 
Bernalillo. N.M.. said he plans to take that 
lesson to heart in his next campaign He 
believes he lost a bid lor county treasurer 
because he did not have the votes of high- 
tech employees and elderly people Now he 
realizes the impocuince of courting those 
constituencin. 

"Latinos are looking forward to growing 
more in numbers and bong able to wm 
more elections in their own communities." 
he said 

Besides appealing to broad coalitions of 
voters, candidates must also attract a new 
bloc of immigrant voters Since 1993. 5.3 
million immigrants became naturalized citi- 
zens: of those. 2.3 million were Latinos, said 
Louis DeSipio. an associate professor of 
political science at the University of IllinoK 
at IJrbana-Champaign 



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little bit of salt. difTereni herh> the 
trick IS letting it saturate and letting it 
absorb overnight." he said 

After C(K>king the meat to his pre- 
ferred mcdium-rarc finish. Coriez 
sprinkles it lightly with either 
Bohemia or Budweiser beer 

Wc sprinkle beer on it to give it 
that navor and smell It accentuates 
the flavor. " Corte? added 

Though many enjoy Independence 
Day festivities, they often do not 
know the history behind the holiday 

In 1776. when the U.S still consist- 
ed only of 13 rebellious British 
Colonies. Richard Henry Lee pro- 
posed a resolution to the Continental 
Congress that the colonies be free and 
independent states The resolution 
was passed on July 4 

Although Independence Day was- 
n't declared an official holiday until 
l<MI. Americans have been celebrat- 
ing freedom since the initial festivities 
on July 8. 1776 when the Declaration 
of Independence was read aloud to 
citi/ens in Philadelphia and citv bells 
rang out 

Fourth-ytar Latin American stud- 
ies student Danielle Oliver said she 
appreciates the fireworks, but she 
doesn't celebrate the Fourth of JuK 

"I. <» an African American woman 



CYBERSTALKING 

FnmipageS 

hamssing and iluuiiLuiiii! ^Mtiadb in 
~Star Trek Voyager" actress Jen 
Ryan and her boyfriend Pagtakhan. 
who spent several months in ^lll await- 
ing trial, was ordered to stay away 
from the couple, keep away from com- 
puters and seek mental treatment 

In another Los Angeles case, a 
aecurity guard spumed by a woman he 
met in church was senterKed to six 
years in prison in 1999 for using the 
bilemet in an effon to get the woman 
raped In mes.sages sent on the 
Internet. Gary Stephen Dellapenta 
posed as the woman, claimed to have a 
fantasy of a "home invasion rape" and 
gave iHit her address 

• In Maryland. Warren Gray. 19. 
was sentenced last year to V^ months 
in prison for sending threatening e^ 
mail to a high school administrator 
The e-mail included threats to kill the 
administrator, harm his family and 
bum down his home v 



COURT 



nimity whenever possible It is an 
increasingly difficult goal m practice, 
with the number of 5-4 outcomes 
climbing nearly every year recentU 

"The court is riven with disagree- 
ments about fundariKntal legal ques- 
tions." said lawyer Thomas CJoldsiein. 
who participated in 10 ol the 79 cases 
argued betorc the court this year 

"The number (of .M splits) is much 
higher, and the stakes arc much high- 
er" 

FiMirteen ol' those M decisions fea- 
tured the same conservativc-lcd lineup 
as in Bush v Gore Chiet lu.stice 
William H Rehnguist and Justices 
Clarence Thomas. Antonin Scalia. 
Anthony M Kennedy and Sandra 
Day O'Connor in the maiority. 
Justices John Paul Stevens. Ruth 
Bader Ginsburg. David .Soutex and 
Stephen G Breycr in dis.scnt 

That 5-4 lineup prevailetl in a states 
rights ca<«e. ruling that state employees 
cannot sue lor on-the-job discrimina- 
tion under the AnuTicans With 
Disiibilities Act The siime M coun 
hmiied the scope ol the landmark 1964 
Civil Rights Act. with a ruling thai 
individuals mav not sue state agencies 
over allegedly discriminatory polKies 

A few of the year's 5-4 decisions 
victories for the court's four- 



coming out of a family that was 
enslaved, did noi receive my indepen- 
dence from the signing of the 
Declaration of Independence. " she 
said That day had nothing to do 
with us It had to do with them steal- 
ing land from Mexico and taking our 
profits " 

While the Declaration of 
Independence proclaimed that "all 
men are created equal " the 
Constitution said that African 
Americans. Latinos and American 
Indians were not considered "full per- 
sons." Instead, they were subject to 
slave trade, extermination and other 
atrocities at the hands of newly liber- 
ated American citizens 

Oliver criticized educators who 
teach a version of history that encour- 
ages African American. Latino and 
American Indian students to unknow- 
ingly celebrate what many call a bii- 
lersweel holiday Members of these 
groups olten tell <i difl'erent stt>ry ol 
the chain of events that led to the 
building of the nation than the one 
taught in many US history cla.sses 

Others have fond memories of 
Fourth of July celebrations Corte/ 
remembers carne asada barbecues 

"Most of the tiniK you can't help 
but have at least four children running 
arou;id. he said The kids are play- 
ing hide-and-seek, the aroma is in the 
air. people are talking and having a 
good time ' 

In Maiite. u man angry at his ex- 
girlfncnd posted a photograph of her 
on the Internet last year, describmg her 
as a "student/escort" When people 
responded to the soliatation. the man 
sent them his ex-girlfriend's real 
"addresses, at home and at college in 
Massachusetts 

Her family was receiving calls 
from strange men. looking for their 
daughter for sexual reasons." said 
Detective Sgt Dave Gordon of 
Kennebunk. Maine "They were very 
Irighlcncd " 

Protection orders were issued in 
Maine and Mas.sachusetts. barring the 
man from further harassment But 
Gordon, echoing officers m other 
stales, said the case helped convince 
him that Maine needed a specific 
cyberstalking law to deter harasaers 
and make prosecutions easier 

There arc lots of things ytni can do 
with the Internet to destroy someone 
from the comfort of your own home." 
Gordon said "The cyberstalking 
statute gives us a better tool to work 



member moderaie-to-liberal wing, 
requiring them to win over a swing 
voter. 

O'Connor switched sides to uphold 
the ragged outlines of a North 
(. aroiina congressional district against 
charges it was a racial gerrymander 
She also loincd the nonconscrvativcs 
lo rule thai political parties must obey 
Watergate-era campiiign spending lim- 
its 

A switch by Kennedy created the 
majority m a case rc|cctinp the govern- 
ment's plan to automatically 6epor\ 
thousiinds ol immigrants who have 
Lommitted crimes in the I nitcd States 

Various justices bri>ke ranks with 
their usual ideological partners in rul- 
ings that gave police clearer power to 
mitkc full arrests from minor traffic 
stops, but forbade the use of heat 
detectors to check lor drug activity 
without a warrant An unusual lineup 
also voted that disabled golfer Casey 
Martin may use a cart on the P(iA 
lour 

What emerged was a complex, 
nuanced view of .i court with clear ide- 
ological polev but ample i..ipacily \o 
surprise, lawyers s<iid 

Michael ( arvin. wh«i helped argue 
tieorgc W Bush s election cases in 
Florida, figuratively threw up his 
hands at the prospect of pinning down 
thcjuslK.'es 

"There arc no principles There are 
no trends " he said 



Daily Bruin Nrws 



Monday. July 2. 2001 9 



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Daily Bruin 




omt 



Vl(>iidd>. Jul\ 2. 2(K)1 



Next week a columnist will 
describe why many LlCLA 
students might experience 
their midlife crises early. 

Mewpoim#fnedu.ucta.edu 



Academic experience hurt by north-south division 



MAJORS: Uell-rounded 
I Cl.A applirants leave 
versatility in hiph school 

The inspiralion lor ihis column 
.amc to mc countless times 
while attenOmg thrs >chool It 
came Irom tamiK. old triends and 
new acquamtances alike lt> the ten- 
Jcne\ tocalegori/e people a.s "North 
(. ampu^ (liK-rai ans and hislor\ 
lunkiesi or "South C ampus" (science 
and engineerini! brainiacsl 

Siiiin^ down to dinner dinner with 
.1 bunch ol Incnds the loolprcxil con- 
uTvition siarici 



9 



iiiumd So 
i^hal ^ \iiu: 

IV,,UOl"' 1 U Hlkt 

itien respond 
Hii'liiev .iikI 
!l;^lor^ 
Hh<li>L'\ ,iikI hl^• 

•:.'r'.' Wlu- 
-•vci iicarJ ot 
!h.il -\ikI I>'i 
■:n.' most p. in 

P'.MpIc uoiikl he 

^vnumcK 

>hockeil il noi impressed b\ .t double 
iTi.iior W<nv .1 North ( ampus and a 
> >uih ( .impus student ' What are 





Victoria 
Tai 



Tdi i<^ d s<»cond-year microbiology ar>d 
history student who is vice president of 
the Society of Automotive Engineering 
She believes that UCLA racing and 
design are part of a complete nutrition 
al diet tmail her at vt(a>ucla.edu 



No. Im simpl> lascmatcd b\ Kith 
fields, although the> have nearJy 
nothinu in common Surprised b> the 
di%ersit\ ' >ou shouldn't be A person 
with a wide range of capabilities and 
interests should not be anything new 
in tact, most ot the student popula 
tion here are those kinds of people 

A^ a student of two opposite inter- 
ests. I Hnd myself befriending groups 
ot both types But despite their difler- 
cnces. they have one similar charac- 
teristic They are both unwilling to 
profess any interest in other disci- 
plines In fact, they revel in their spe- 
ciali7atK>n ol one distinct field And 
while that's wonderful, the things 
they say arc troubling 

T(M> many times. I've heard people 
excusing themselves from analyzing a 



math problem or writing a decent 
paper on the basis that they are 

North C ampus' or "South 
Campus " it's as if upi>r having 
determined a specialized discipline, 
abilities in all other disciplines crum- 
ble 

St)mehow. upiw entering a fine 
university people lose the versatility 
they had in high sch(X)l. the same one 
that got them admitted in the nrst 
place But I don't buy that 

The way I figure, the majority of 
people here ought to be coping with if 
not alstvseeking to understand, the 
discrepancies between unrelated 
fields After all. weren't we admitted 
based on the fact that we were aWc to 
excel in a wide range of subjects'' 

Remember the infamous buzz- 



word, "well rounded''" 

We all had lu write wonderful per- 
sonal statements for our application 
Many students here were valedictori- 
ans or salutatonans in high school 
Many more were in the top 10 per- 
cent of their class How is it that the 
students who mastered six or seven 
diflerent subjects in high sch(H)l lose 
all their academic versatility withm a 
lew years'' 

There s widespread indolence on 
this campus and it s disgusting Even 
w ith the wide variety of student 
groups, there is little participation 
There are probably more wht) prefer 
lingering in the campus arcade than 
enlisting in community service There 
are probably more who would rather 
go to the beach during lectures than 



involve themselves in the debate 
team And perhaps there are more 
who would choose playing video 
games and watching movies over 
exercising their bodies. 

It's lime to compare the intended 
population the university recruits ver- 
sus what students become after being 
admitted 

The intended population demon- 
strates promise and vigor, they were 
active g«vgetters in high schtwl They 
were not people who shied away from 
challenges or situations but rather, 
tackled different subjects to the best 
of their ability The question is. what 
happened** 

Now. don't misunderstand me. I 



12 



Affirmative action 
should help low- 
income students 

. I wanted to comment on 
Atllrmativc action prop<inents still 
tacc uphill battle" by Michael Weiner 
I IXiiK Brum. News. June I! ). as well 
.I-- on the wh<»lc afTirmativf action 
debate in general 

I )is».Tiinmatmg against whites and 
males with afVirmatne action pro- 
L'raiiis IS lust as wrong as the anli- 
minoritv sentiments that supposcdK 
m.ike such programs ncccssar\ The 
•hstacle lacing ^(sadvanlaged people 
in uni\ersit% admissions and emp|o\- 
ment is tvA race it is socioeconomic 
status 

Fhe quality ol a student s primary 
L'lliication IS dept-ndeni up«>n how 
much monc\ the student s laniilv has. 
IV )i the color ol their skin I acknowl- 
edge thai these iwt> lactors tend to be 
nicrlwined hut thc\ are not cause 
.ind-ctleci MVirmat reaction sh(»uld 
hi-notit poor whiles as well as pH>or 
minorities 

1 hese disadvant.iped children g(> 
li ihe ^ame inner-cil\ scho<ils Wh\ 
^ll 'iikl minoriiv siutlents be gi\cn 
pielerence i>\ei whites and certair 
\-ian- «hi' '■>ul1fred the s.ime ohsia 



cics and lite experiences' 

\ccess to higher educatitm is virtu- 
ally nonexistent for economicallv div 
advantaged students of all races. If 
"the era of affirmative action (isj 
coming to an end " we need to formu- 
late a plan that will provide all disad- 
vantaged children with the opp<muni- 
t\ to succeed 



what your institution is doing and I 
wtmld never recommend anyone to 
attend ytnir university' 



UCLA should ban 

identity-based 

graduations 

I find It abviluteh ridiculous that 
your university actually allows gay. 
lesbian, bisexual and transgender 
pe(iple to have their own graduation 
ceremony ( "( elebrate gotxJ times' 
Haih Brum. News. June 1 1 1 

Do you also have a "fieterosexual" 
celebration ' It not. that's biased' You 
arc selling out to homosexuals and 
legitimizing their personal sexual 
prclcrencc at the expense of those 
who arc opposed to and .tshamed ol 
their bcha\ lor 

\\ the cost of "inclusion. ■ you arc 
alienating the heterc^sexual majonty 
ot this country | personally abhor 



Diversity among 
whites needs to 
be recognized 

In regards to Howana Lundy's 
comment, pkase don't take this the 
wrong way. but we "whites" come in 
all shapes, colors and religions, too' 
( "Speaksout. " Daily Brum. 
Viewptunt. June 25) 

1 went to I 'C'L.A when the affirma- 
tive actum program was in full swing 
In my opinion, it didn't help anyone 
People of my religion are a minority. 
to«i but we don't and never have 
gotten any "affirmative action " 

Perhaps you would like to fight for 
■'female rights " like we had to do. way 
back when, in the long lost days of the 
Vietnam War. when women were 
referred to as girls' at I'CLA If you 
want to talk about being invisible, we 
were' We worked our rears off to 
make a difference No one handed 
anything to us 

The "Nacks" had their own special 



place down by the ""old" Student 
Union Please don't get me wrong, 
but discrimination is wrong C aH it 
what It is: discnmination Giving pecv 
pie "speciai" places on campus or 
hand-outs due to color is wrong, 
whether it is Mack or white If you 
want to be a part of the real world, 
you will have to realize that most of 
us are discTiminated against for some- 
Amg. 

Get off your high horse and realize 
that you can make a difTerence on 
your own if you try Quit waiting for 
someone to hand it to you as a Wue- 
plate special Get on with your own 
life and live it. Life doesn't come 
"cheap" or easy. 

Mffl I 
VQAI 



Zero-tolerance 
policy ultimately 
protects students 

Thtimas Soteros-McNanuinu tn 
hiN viewpoint .submission 
("LTniversity drinking policy is unfair 
to students." Daily Brum. June 25). 
attacks a system meant to protect the 
I ICLA community by making the 
argument that "it s not fair " 

But the zercvtolerance afcohol poli- 



cy does not concern itself with what's 
fair By design, the rule is meant to 
protect students from themselves, 
whether they be below or above the 
legal age limit 

What the rule is saying is that the 
University does not support the con- 
sumption of alcohol by students, 
either because it is harmful to them- 
selves (the binge drinkers), to their 
education or to the community at 
large (drunk driving takes thousands 
of lives every year) 

What Soteros-McNamara fails to 
observe ls that laws which restrict 
one's behavior cannot, by virtue of 
their design, be "fair " Often, the 
majority is forced to give up what 
may seem a right m order to protect 
the minonty. and themselves, from 
abusing that right Such is the case 
with drugs, including alcohol. 
' Most people are capable of dnnk- 
ing in mtxleration. realizing their lim- 
its and staying within them, but some 
people are not as fortunate, and thus 
pose a danger to themselves and to 
others if left to their own devices 

Thus, the legal-age students must 
give up their right to consume ak:<^o{ 
on campas m order to protect 
younger students 



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IAS04 iHtN/OMy 8nar>^i«noi SwD 



Action disrespects natural beauty 



.\Jtematives m«y 
lielp preserve remaining 
Eucalyptu.ses on campus 



By 

Last Wednesday. I read with shock 
wid dismay about the decision to cut 
down the magnificent and historic 
Eucalyptuses that have graced 
UCLA s southern entrance lor over 
72 years ("University cuts down Si 
Eucalyptus trees." Daily Brum. News. 
June 25) 

Having now seen the results of your 
actions. I am deeply saddened by the 
k)ss of these natural monuments to the 
community 1 am also \ott\ for thou- 
sands of others who will nOw enter a 
I iC LA missing the sense ol distinc- 
tiiMi. rich histor\ and character that 
these spectacular trees had imparted 

Having denuded the school's south- 
wn entrance, there is still time to 
reconsider your decision to do the 
same to the campus's distinctive north- 
em entrance and border along Sunset 
Boulevard 

Oavis IS a resident of Bel Air 



i was born in Los Angeles and now 
live in Bel Air immediately north of 
campus. I admittcdiv am a great 
admirer of old trees, as I have come to 
appreciate - amid all the aty's crowds 
and chaos that these trees are magi- 
cal m their ability to provide relief and 
rejuvenation 



The tragedy is that 
what nature has taken 

close to 1 00 years to 
create, chain saws can 

^ kill in seconds. 



To me and many others, old-growth 
trees are one of the truly defining and 
beautifying characteristics of West 
LA 

Without old buildings (few in West 
LA are as t)ld a.s UCLA's original 
Eucalyptuses), these trees arc i>ur 
monuments Their ages alone makes 
them important, meaningful and irre- 
placcabk These are our landmarks 



and all of us are their custodians 

UCLA has been given stewardship 
of these treasured state as.sets on 
behalf not just of faculty, stall and stu- 
dents, but of all other California tax- 
payers as well 

These historic creations should not 
simply be subject to questions regard- 
ing what is "appropriate" landscaping 
They were here before you or I and 
they shoukJ be afforded the protection 
and respect that cklers deserve. 

As 1 compose this piece. I am 
standmg beneath a majestic 
Eucalyptus alt)ng Sunset B<^ulevard. 
closest ti> the Roycc Avenue entrance 
It IS nothing short of awe-inspinng to 
stand beside this tree its massive 
trunk IS 8 feet in diameter and 2 1 feet 
around, all supporting iLs I(KM(hM 
height 

As I gaze up at it. I feel like I have 
on thousands ol other (xcasions dri- 
ving, biking or running along Sunset I 
am humbled by the tree's size and age. 
and relaxed by the rustling of its leaves 
high above mc in the wind For a 
moment I can escape from the realities 
of the great city around me. reminded 
of nature's beauty and omnipotence 



Sm 



13 



MSOMMAC 



By Tony Wu and Michelle Cheng 




Monda). Jul> 2. 2(M)I II 



Speaks Out 



Recently, the university decided to cut down 50 Eucalyptus 
trees perceived as potentially dangerous in order to maximize 
campus safety. Sonie, however, believe measures should have 
been taken to identify and cut down only those trees posing an 
immediate rjsic. What do you think about the university's 
decision? 



Bruce Switvr 




frinLobo 


Campus visitor 




Third year 




"It ruined 


Neurouience and worl 






.M ' 


the whole 
U)ok ol the 


P^R 


miv 


street and 


^V'^H^ 


mm 1 


the entrance 


"^iJnC 


m 


to the cam- 
pus It used 
to be shady 
and a little 
more envi- 


Wm 




ronmentally friendly Now you 
come up and all you can see are 
the faces of the brick buildings: 
It s kind of barren looking I 
don't like the way it l(H>kN " 



Nidt Oonatoni 
Fourth-year 
Mechanical engineering 

"If trim- 
ming the 
trees would 
have 

worked. I 
would have 
preferred to 
do that It 
gave a cer- 
tain kind of 
atmosphere to UCLA I would 
have asked students - and 
maybe set up a student commit- 
tee to determine what what 
they wanted to replace the trees 
with, or to at least have a say in 
the decision ' 

DanDeming 

Third-year 
School of Medicine 

"I'm not 
a huge envi- 
ronmental- 
ist, but Im 
sure they 
had a good 
reason tor 
cutting the 
trees down 
It s kind of 
rude just taking them down and 
answering questions later, but I 
don't think anylnxly would have 
been able to fight it or preserve 
them I don't see anything 
wrong with what they did They 
did It to make the campus safe, 
and that s more important than 
saving a couple of old trees ' 




I m real- 
ly sad 

because the 
trees were 
g«u>d lor 
shade 1 
think It 
would have 
been ginnl to 
have been 
given notice beforehand 
Knowing that it was going to hap- 
pen winild have been nice, 
instead of coming to campus one 
day and seeing big holes instead 
of trees." 

jonn Boiko 
Storffceeper 
School of Engmeermg and AppM Science 

^^Br I 'i' he 

**^^^^ ■ cut dow n 

Some of 
these trees 
are so old 
they get brit- 
tle and 

bugged I think interior-wi>e 
where they are not in the road- 
way, the trees can stay, but I 
agree with the of'ficjals Even 
though It s a shame they have to 
do It. I'd rather lean *>n the side 
of safety rather than an\thinj; 



TifbnyLee 

Third year 
Psychobiology 

"Cutting 
down the 
trees takes 
away from 
the aesthetic 
beaut> ol 
the scho»>l 
they smell 
good loo 
It's so bor- 
ing in South (ampus: there was 
only one tree in fnmt of the 
medical pla/a and they cut it 
down I think they should have 
trimmed them so they were not 
so top-heavy, and they definilcK 
should have approached the 
UCLA community about the 
matter ' 




Speaks Out compiled by Ed Chiao, Daily Brum Senior Staff. Photos by 
Courtney Stewart. Daily Brum Staff 



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do believe that people should special- 
tze in their respective fields That's 
what distinguishes elite professionals 
But people should als^) embrace muk 
tifaceted talents and not ignore them. 



The automatic 

categorization and 

confining of people to 

their respective niajors 

can be debilitating. 



My skm cniwts when I hear the 
excuse "I don't do papers. I'm an 
ei^ineer." or **Math problems are 
for science brains. I gave up on that 
as soon as I got into college" Give 
me a break TheK are the people 
who scored As in calculus and 
English in high school. These are the 
people who rocked the SAT or ACT. 
Yet seemingK. they arc the ones who 
discourage the mingling of diflereiit 
fields 

Students arc automatically catego- 
rized baaed on their major And per- 
haps that's for good reason 
Certainly, some trends do justify 
these comments 

Life scieiKX and chemistry stu- 
dents tend to focus less on creative 
arts, whereas liberal arts students 
tend to focus more on expression. 
Computer science and engineering 
students generalK tend to master 
computational mathematics while art 
and film students tend fo be more 
involved with interpretive visuals. 



It's insulting when I 

dress up nicely and 

someone says, "You 

don't look like a South 

Campus major today." 



But at the same time, the automat- 
ic categorization and confining of 
people to their respective majors can 
be debilitating 

The stereotype causes us to associ- 
ate with only certain types of people 
It causes us to define ourselves by a 
fashion that is simply wrong. Who 
made up these classifications any- 
way"^ Who IS to say thai math stu- 
dents do not enjoy classical theater 
and psychology students aren't inter- 
ested in Chicana/o studies'* 

As people exclude themselves 
from disciplines and groups, they fail 
to fully take advantage of the college 
experience When they remnincc 
groups, they also exclude themselves 
from other people These are people 
who can provide powerful connec- 
tions or referrals m the future 

All of us are in this school based 
on our diversity, versatility, and flexi- 
bility It's disturbing how intolerant 
and rejecting some are of people in 
other majors I've heard more com- 
ments and criticisms of certain 
majors here than I do of LISC - and 
that's just ridiculous 

It's not only the rejection of indi- 
vidual disciplines involved m this 
negative categorization, hul general 
personalities and appearances as 
well It's insulting when I dress up 
nicely and s<imeone says. "You don't 
look like a South ( ampus major 
today " What's that supposed to 
mean'!' I feel like saying. "You idiot, 
science girls like to kxA attractive 
and we care about hygiene just like 
anybtxly else'" 

Right now solutions to this prob- 



Daily Brum Viewpoint 



Monday. July 2. 2001 13 



TAI 

Frompage 12 



lem don't \ook promising The roofs 
of stereotyping and classilying are an 
innate function of human logic it is 
difficuh to re-program this logic 
because people h^ve historicallv 
made generalizations of groups 
based on their perceptK)ns ol com- 
mon characteristics 

The fact that the universit\ in low- 
ering required general education 
units doesn't help Now. students are 
encouraged to graduate quickly and 
take fewer courses that don't pertain 
to their major 

Although this alleviates the univer- 
sity's fmancial pressure for Tidal 
Wave II - the expected increase of 
■bout 60.000 students over the next 
decade - it discourages students 
from exploring diHerent fields 
Because of this decision, some stu- 
dents may never find that one ran- 
dom subject that appeals to them and 
invigorates their college experience. 

The only wa\ students can diversi- 
fy their education is through self- 
motivation That includes taking 
extrrG.E classes that 'don't count" 
or joining campus clubs Like the 
high school days when we needed to 
take initiative to get ourselves into 
college, we must continue that here. 

In my college years I'd like to pur- 
sue a wide range of studies and I'd 
like my colleagues to embrace that 
ideal too Thai's what makes people 
interesting and intriguing. 

It makes me cringe when people 
automatically reject the unknown 
and take the easy way out I thought 
the intellectual setting of a world- 
class university would abolish that. 

DAVIS 

Ffompigell 

In our worW of man-made immedi- 
acy and artificiality, these trees stand 
as reminders of our limitations and of 
nature s unique power The tragedy is 
that what nature has taken close to 
100 years to create, chain saws can kill 
in seconds And once destroyed, no 
tree which you attempt to replace 
these with will - during our lifetimes, 
or those of iHir children ever achieve 
the grandeur ol these remaining 
Eucalyptuses 

To claim that these trees are about 
to fall down seems prepostert^s 
especially when standing next to them 
and feeling the incrediNe strength of 
their trunks I would encourage you to 
seek a second opinion 



These (trees) are our 

landnruirks and all of us 

are their custodians. 



To cut them all down based on 
hypothetical risks strikes me as an 
extreme irrationality - akin to ban- 
ning automobiles on the I'CLA cam- 
pus because of risks to pedefinans 
and bicyclists. 

It's indisputaMe that limbs will 
occasionally fall from nature's oldest 
and largest cTcations . but that is a 
RMriMt nsk we bear in return for the 
immeasurable benefits we receive 
from sharing space with these lower- 
ing witnesses of our past 

And needless to say, aggressive 
trimming (and even cabling) can virtu- 
ally eliminate the nsk of large limb 
failures 

So I ask you to please reainsider 
the fate of the remaining landmark 
Eucalyptuses at the campus's north- 
ern entranoe. 

Given an action which is so irre- 
versible, why mtt yieW to beauty, to 
protecting the okl. to preservmg 
something so irreplMMMe and nur- 
turing to UCLA's deserved distinc- 
tion and character? Tran them only if 



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Devoted punk rock fans sweat 
it out at Vans Warped Tour 



Bv M«ry Williams 

riailv Brum Senioi Stdtf 

Nti.': -:ii: .11 .Ah.iiiNiinij iiiiic liiHirN on ihcir 

: si.\,^'::t'j .tnii'imi .>l '.r.i>h >n ihc 

.■• ..'v.; .r,<: -.nr'tv. tl^lu^,lIKi- >•' piii»k mck 

■ ■■ ■ . i.-i.- :•■ 1 rul.f. ~ \.in- W.irpi'ii |.«u! .iikI 

■ .. K ■ ■<:• iinii! !li.' .-nd 

I ! ;' ■ ' . A.ii^! u.l^ ,ir :i;':pK>>". .■ iiiu-iip th.i; 
: - -l>\' .0 !v *^.ilKl- 'i: 'i\ ^;.^_l.•L■- .'.Ikl .ii; 
!'i-'V ,.| cMrCHK' -.ptTI- jthL'lv'^ 

\-K \^,i:pi.\i li'iii m.iJc iw .inii.i.i! >iiip m 

1 \;;-'JI,-- 'ihl> -i-M! Ullll MiPK' ''1 itu' K'>I 

■^,i!k!- Ill punk ruck Bui a> gixKl .in the pcrlnr- 
•luiiKc- VM.TL- II vsas llu' crowd lh<u made thf 
>h>'u evtitini; wnh iIn alnioM bvumdkNN encrt:\ 
IIk ci'iiccrt started at lUHin hut didn't rcalK 
lie", i-'oini; until about an hnut later One ot the 
!iT\t hands 1(1 perlorni wa> the mainstream rtK;k 
uiaup \lieii Ant Farm Its pcrtormance N*as 
iinrcni.irkahle evcepi lor the hi/arre on-stape 

iiuiv.^ oi h.issisi \\c /amora vvho stuck his 
■oni;in' ou: ai ihc auslicnce atki made ^eird 
■fv.!.-- i^hiic pKiMiii: 

( 'li 'V'liL' Mien \nt I arn; wa> the punk 
'\!;ij \l 1 v^hivh closed the show the da\ 
•sji.iK ! Veriiur.i The hanJ kepi i1n audience 
!iio\ :;-• .u.d 111 niosi ta.scs. >ini:mi: aloni: with 

■--'tii:^ \ v..>lui sc' t'rouuhi ou! tht- most ener- 
j, llu- .KKlieiKc e\hihiied with all the eariiei 

V\ nc^mAmii; punk hunil (nitiermouth gave 
.11 eiK'iiiciu perlormaiice to an enthused 
.; 'wjol ahoui TIM) ptople on the \oicom Side 
Sl.iL'i. liie audience was small compared [o 
;h,i' '• !tie niain-siage acts, due to the tact that it 
\^.i- .1 loiii; and ciowded walk triMii the main 
^tagCN 

(lutlermouth demonstrated its tan-triendl\ 
lUitiide i.ilwa\s.i plus I as it got nd ot the line ol 
NC^uritv and allowed audience members on 
Nt.iiie 

Rappei Kool keith added di\ersit\ t*> the' 
show with his performance on the main stage 
\n the sole hip-hop act in a punk rock show, his 
sei was distinctK i>ut ol place but a testament id 



the cro>M>\er appeal of hip-hop toda> Vlan\ 
members ot the audience were aWc to chime in 
at the chorus and. after the first It'w songs, most 
heads were KiHbinc and some fists were pound- 
ing in the air 

I here wa- something strange however 
.iK>ui .1 \ew Ni'rk hip-hop artist pia>ing to a 
^rowd >l hall-c-nthused Southern California 
kids with mohawks -\s good as ii vvas. his time 
on Niage seemed like an interieciioij rather than 
.1 par! i>! the concert 

I he Bouncing SouK. oik- of the heller punk 
Hinds noi pla>ed iiii ihe radio, won over the 
crowd with Its entertaining, upbeat set of pop- 
punk simgs Singer Circg \ltonilo is a charis- 
matic performer and the group had a loi of anx- 
ious tans in the audience 

I'ennvwise. a.s expected, caused the most 
uproar in the crowd The mamsiav ol punk 
commanded the audience s respect and atlen- 
tion with Its p<»wertul lineup of both old and 
new stmgs Mwavs good performers. 
Pennvwi>e didn t disappoint its tans 

•\s ihe concert progressed, dehydrated and 
sweats tans pushed through crowds and trash 
li' get from one stage to .mother ^'\lh vendors 
selling out of water and no break in the actum. 
n !s ama/mg thai the audience kept bouncing. 
mi»shing and crowd surfing with as much ener- 
gv as thev displaved 

But bounce the;> did .ind when New found 
tilorv iiv>k the stage, the group was greeted 
with an eager audience Its set of commerciallv 
viable pop-punk songs and the crowd's recep- 
tion shi>wed that this band has commercial hit 
potential along the same lines as Blink- 1X2 
What the band lacks in origmalitv of sound il 
makes up tor in calchv tunes 

Not everyone was pica.sed with New Kound 
Cilorv. however When Us set ran long, mem- 
hers of an enormous crowd waiting tor 
Rancid s entrance expressed their displeasure 
.It the delay Ciathered in front of the stage 
where the band would begin as soon a.s New 
hound Glory finished, over a hundred fans held 
their middle fingers in the air in the direction of 




Tim Armstrong frontman for veteran punk band Rancid, leans over the enthusiastK crowd during the group's set at Vans Warped Tour at the L.A. 
Sports Arena on Friday. The band cut its set short after a fan was injured to avoid fur-her problems. 

the lingering group and began chanting 
"Rancid" 

When Rancid did take the stage, lis mem- 
bers fnrgan encouraging the audience lo form a 
"crazy pit from that tent to the Yoohoo sign." 
gesturing lo an area wider than the stage 
When a pit of a satisfactory size formed, the 
group resumed playing 

The pit never did reach the >'tHihoo sign: but 
It did leave sc>meone injured When the band 
wa.s informed of this, it slopped playing and 
announced that m punk riKk. people should 
take care oi each other This declaration was 
met with loud cheering and applause, unlike the 
announcement that followed - that the band 
v^ouki cut Its set short rather than risk any more 
injuries 

The move was responsible and brave, risking 
the crowd s disappointment following the high 
expectations it had for the set Rancid encour- 
aged Its fans to have a gtxid time, but in the end. 
It wisely put the safety of the audience first 

While I'ennywisc caused the most turmoil m 
the audience. .^1 1 got the most people jumping 
.A strong performance full of p<ipular songs 
sucked the la.st of the energy from the crowd A 
final spike of liveliness came when the group 




; Adkim of GuTtermouth smgs with one of the band's crazed fans at Vans Warped Tour as rts 
members perform on a smaller stage without a security blockade. 



Valv ;if)<>t hall < 



■\ ( olUxtion of works h\ an ist 
Sahador Daii wiU tx* on displdv 
at I CI A startint: July 14 Sfo 
.ArfcF n«'xt wt'ck for detaib. 

Monddv liih 2 20(11 



15 



Winslow 
Homer s paint- 
ing "The 
Cotton 
Pickers" is 
arguably the 
best in this 
collection, 
demonstrating 
the artist's 
technique 
of character 
placement and 
perspective 




LACM A showcases artwork of Winslow Homer 



MUSEUM: Exhibit reveals 
progression of artist in 
creating American style 



;; Dally Brum Senior Staff 



Although they don't like to admit it. 
critics have an embarrassing habit of 
being wrong 

Take for example the reviews quot- 
ed in the Los Angeles Coumy Museum 
of Arts exhibit "Winslow Homer and 



the Critics: Forging a National Art in 
the 1870s." where nearly every paint- 
ing IS accompanied by a quote describ- 
ing Its critical reception in New York 

The exhibit of Homer's early works, 
which are now cherished by the 
American public and recognized as 
vastly important in the development of 
American art. provides fascinating 
insight into Homer's progression as an 
artist. 

At a time when Furopean. particu- 
larly French, anists held the spotlight. 
Homer was at the forefront of a racof- 
nizably and purely Amencan art tradi- 



tion Influenced by the rough brush- 
work of Impressionist painters, his art 
was criticized for looking "unrinished" 
or "rough." while at the same lime 
praised tor its distinctly American sub- 
jects 

As his career progressed. Homer 
learned that visible brush strokes could 
be forgiven m scenes of American chil- 
dren and rural life and conversely, that 
he could paint other .subjects without 
loss ol support from the critics as long 
as he paid more attention to detail 

Not everything written about 
Hoaier was negative - he was acknowl- 



edged as the premier American artist 
of his time However, he was under 
intense pressure to produce work that 
was acceptable to critics who were con- 
cerned with the future of the then- 
developing identity of American art 

LAC'MAs exhibit effectively shows 
Homer's struggle with this tasli. as he 
became increasingly concerned with 
distinctly American scenes and the 
effects of color, line and level of finish 
on his art and on the entire an world 

Since It IS a coUecticm focused on 



iemmon remembered for Ns dedication 



ACTOR: Otcir wfirmr. 

SperKPr Trao> ^vAard 
recipient dies at age 76 



By Anfda Salaiar 
Daily Buun Senior ^uff 

Jack Lemmon's respect was hard- 
earned, but I ( 'I A got It. 

The 7(>-yearH>ld acior - a twxvtime 
Oscar w inner ( Best Supporting Actor 
lor l«*55's "Mister Robens and Best 
Actor for l97.^'sr"Save the Tiger) 
died Wednesday of complicaiionN 
from cancer He is best remembered 
for his ri>les opp«»site Walter Malthau 
in such films as " ITie Odd C ouple' 
and "(irumpy ( Md Vien' a> well as his 
lead role> m ihe Billv NNilder film> 
"Some like it Hot" «mI "The 
Apartment " 

Lemmon appeared at I '("LA last 
November lo accept the Spencei 
Tracv Award Ciiven out annuallv bv 
the C ampus lvent> ( ommissum. the 
award honors an out.standing dramai 
ic acu>r in motion pictures Lemmon 
wa.s the 12th recipient of this award 

An accomplished HoIKwchkI slat 
Lemm»m held firm to traditional per 
lormance and actor training tech- 
niques In an interview with the Dailv 
Bruin prior t(> the 2(MMi Spencer I racy 
Award ccremonv. Lemmon ■•aid that 
one of the problem> w ith films todiiy is 
that young actors come lo LA and 
want to be famous right away but lack 
real experience He was impre>Ncd 
however, by students studying acting 
at universities 

During his acceptance of the 
Spencer Tracy Award. Lemmi)n said 
that he believed much of the nevi tal- 
ent comes out of acting courses like 
the ones availaWc at I'CL.A 

Though much of his >ucce>s 
stemmed from his mainstream film 
and TV roles. Lemmon also empha- 
sized the imponance of stage training 
for young actors, which, he said, pnv 
vides the experience of doing sus- 
tained and corpplctc scenes and acts 
Fhi^ kind of training mav seem ditTi- 
cult or unnecessary, but. according lo 
Lemmon. it gcxrs along vMlh the job 

"In acting. 1 don t care who you are 




Jack Lemmoffi received the Spencer Tracy Award for lifetime 
achievement in film in Royce Hall on Nov 28, 2000 



there's gonna be ups and downs and 
you've got to be able to handle the drv 
periods and the down peruKls. which 
IS not ea.sy but it > something you have 
to do if y<Hi just don't want to do 
baUmey.' Lemmon said 

Mc belicveti that not only do 
lodav s films lack experienced actors, 
they aiNO lack go«>d scripts and plot 
development He said that recent 
comedies are missing the character 
growth necessary f»ir the comedy lo 
come from the behavior of the people 
within the situation something char- 



acteristic of much of hiN (»wn work 

His repertoire included both 
comedic and dramatic performance- 
in film and tclev iMon and on the stage 
Lemmon s passion for acting 
remained strong throughout his 5t^ 
year career ^^'hen asked it he w»»uld 
c\er considering retiring. Lemmon s 
reply exemplified his devotion to the 
art 

"No way If I get run over by .i 
truck or a prcxluccr or a critic Lnlcss 
that happens III just keep on going ' 
he >aid 



^Snapshot' takes raw look at LA. culture 



EXHIBfT: I p-and-coming 
artists displav their work, 
get a chance in spoUight 



8y 

Daily Brum Senior Staff 

In her contribution to the new 
UCLA Hammer Museum exhibit 
"Snapshot New Art from Los 
Angeles." artist Bea Schlinelhoff 
hand-writes participating artists 
resumes onto while sticker paper 

When removed Irom the gallery 
wall in the beginning of September, 
the fragile sheets will tear, ensuring 
that the installation's appearance m 
"Snapshot" will be its one and only 
contact with the outside world 

Such temporality is fitting because 
"Snapshot" intentionallv lakes a 
quick, fleeting glance at new Los 
Angeles art 

Showcasing 25 up-and-coming 
vtists from Southern California, the 
exhibit does not attempt to compre- 
hensively present all that is young 
and creative within the city's con- 



fines Rather. "Snapshot" provides a 
dynamic encapsulation of the evolv- 
ing LA art world, briefly capturing 
the moment as one would catch fire- 
flies in a jar 

By elevating art world neophytes 
to the space of a well-established 
inu.seum. the Hammer portrays the 
proverbial LA shot at stardom.' 
where they could potentially be 
revealing"the next big thing" 

Far from "celebrity artists." many 
of the 25 artists represented boa.st lit- 
tle name recognition beyond, or even 
within, the LA art world 

Some, like Tessa Chasieen. are 
being exhibited for the very first 
time There is no buzz baggage here, 
jusi the raw works held up for people 
to view and judge 

Many of the artists successfully 
rise lo the challenge Steve Ri>dcn s 
sculpture "The Surface of the 
Moon." based on a late l*^h-century 
astronomy b<x)k detailing the moon s 
cratered surface, takes a scientific 
approach to the creation of art 

Each of his 490 tiny wooden fig- 
ures, arranged side by side on a 40- 
foot, low-lying plank, corresponds lo 



an exact formula created using fig- 
ures offered m the book 

RtKlen's work emphasizes thai no 
an ob)cct simply comes into being 
- like anything else, a scientific set ol 
conscious and subconscious process- 
es lays the groundwork for its exis- 
tence 

florian Maier-Aichcn. a Cierman- 
Kirn artist, manipulates photographs 
into an uneasy perfection 
Dominated bv sparkling blue skies 
and waters, the scenes captured in 
the exhibited pieces act as glossv 
facades, resembling images from 
travel briKhurcs However, reality 
will never rival the technicolor 
vision, giving Maicr-.Aichen s work a 
thick aura of expectation and frustra- 
tion 

Artists Aiko Hachisuka and 
Robert Stone also ripple the surface 
of reality b) dealing with forms of 
transportation, a common LA 
theme By welding a shopping cart 
with a soft-form sculpture that mim- 
ics the object's curves. Hachisuka's 
rolling sketch merges the experience 



Sm 



H 



16 Mundiiy. July 2. 2(H) I 



Daily Brum Arte k EalerUiaaeBt 



SNAPSHOT 

From page 1 5 

111 the h*)melcN> ami ihc artist while 
mmrncnlinp on I A n man\ torms 
i)l transportation Stone an archi- 
tect and designer b\ trade, presents 
.1 ^I rap-on speaker created (or a 
Vleuedc^ Ben/ hiL'hIiphtmg excels 
i>ii the road 

Participating artistN also use their 
,ir! -oine more successlulK than 
i)ihei>. lo critique I \ > obsesMon 
with hair 

Mimicking a video promoting 
surgical hair transplant but played 
in reverse Linda Kim s "Hair 
Piece records the path ol tweezers 
plucking individual hairs out of her 
own scalp Whitish oil oozes out 
while some plucks even draw blotxi. 
leaving the viewer nauseated 

Mark Bradford and Kori 
\ewkirk. however make a com- 
pletelv different statement The 
artists subtK examine the connec- 
tion between hair and appearance, 
prtning that art need not wax 
grotesque to make a point 

Bradford, a hair stylist b> day. 
tints the thin papers u.sed to make 
permanent waves to create ethereal 
collages of fabricated beauty 
Likewise. Kori Newkirk transforms 
long black hair extensions into "cur- 
tain paintings." reminiscent of 



HOMER 

From page IS 

the 1870s. many of the paintings on 
exhibit are not widely known, but 
their interest to the viewer lies in the 
changes in style and subject that 
thev demonstrate 

For example, an earlier painting 
in the exhibit. "Camay la Ville - 
Lrench Farm." from IK67 (the year 



beaded curtains strung in door- 
ways 

Other installations also challenge 
and captivate the eyes and ears 
Won Ju Lim s amassment of haunt- 
ing pink acrylic boxes piled before a 
protected factorv scene creates a 
floating sensation, while Ronald 
Santos video diptych ot pulsating 
shapes and moaning sounds simu- 
lates hearing sex from another 
room Deb Lacusta s Being 
Slapped" features the artist deliver- 
ing lines such as "You re a lousy 
lover, intt) a video camera, recreat- 
ing both psychoanalytic and - in a 
verv Los Angeles turn acting tech- 
niques 

With "Snapshot." the Hammer 
continues in a tradition of highlight- 
ing Los Angeles and allowing exhib- 
ited artists the licen.se to branch out 

The Hammer establishes itself as 
a promoter of both Los Angeles as 
well as coniempt>rary art. cement- 
ing Its importance on one of the 
busiest corners in Southern 
California 

At the same time, the exhibit also 
exudes an odd meat-market quality 
linrepresented artists line the 
gallery walls like kids at a junior 
high formal, patiently waiting for 
someone to ask them to dance The 
audition for gallery representation 
extends for months Is the next 
David Hockney waiting m the 



after his return from France) 
depicts a European scene Later 
and more well-known paintings like 
1872s "Snap the Whip." which por- 
trays children playing in front of a 
one- room schooihouse. are dis- 
tinctly American in their subject 
matter 

Aside from illustrating the small 
changes Homer made after consid- 
ering the criticism he encountered, 
the exhibit provides the viewer with 



wings 

This might explain why many of 
the works represented are auda- 
cious and starving for attention. 
Speciahzation is the key to the mar- 
ket, and if "'hair reduction surgery" 
garners the agent's eye, then so be 
It 

trie Wesley s contributions, 
then, merit special attention. 
Playing on the Hammer s own sense 
of place. Wesley s structural model 
of the Occidental Petroleum build- 
ing, which houses the museum, is a 
creative explication of the artistic 
process 

The model presents the Hammer 
as a massive oil derrick, drawing the 
black gold from the buildings 
underground parking lot aruj into 
the gallery space, where Wesley has 
mounted a large oil stained canvas. 
The piece implies that the art world 
IS a mechanism with many partici- 
pants The museum, it could be said, 
produces artists 

How man> artists will emerge 
from the 15 minutes or three 
months of fame delivered by 
"Snapshot" remains to be seen, but 
the outlook seems positive 



JjlKf: "Snapshot: Nt^ Art from Los 
Angeles' rur« through Sept. 2 at the 
UCLA Hammer Museum, 10899 
Wilsbire Blvd. For more information 
call (310) 443-7020. 



a well-rounded collection from a 
great artist Many of the paintings, 
famous or not. arc striking and 
unusual in their choice of perspec- 
tive and method of representation. 
In "The Cotton Pickers," from 
1876. Homer takes up a historical 
subject in his depiction of two slave 
women picking cotton By painting 
them from a low perspective, the 




Daily Bruin Arts 4 Eniertainmrnt 



Monday, luly 2. 2001 17 




ANGK tFV 



Although its music doesn't fit irrto the punk genre, the band 311, 
fronted by Nidi Hmmm, riled i^ the crowwd with its energetic set. 



WARPED 

From page 14 

played their hit "Down." and even the 
audience members standing far from 
the stage got into the action 

Fenix TX. who closed the show, 
gave an anticiiinactic perfomiance. 
The band failed to get most of the 
beleaguered crowd moving, and in the 
end a few small mosh pns were the 
only sign of activity. 



Arihe end of along day. it may have 
been the bands and athletes who hekJ 
the spotlight, but the real spmt of the 
Vans Warped Tour was found in the 
fans, who didn't let the demands of 
nine hours of non-stop music keep 
them from expressing their love for the 
loud, fast-paced* nomirnMcal none of 
punk rock. 

To see moie color pictures from the 
VlMH Warped Tour, go to the Daity Iruin 
Web site at «wvw.da<lybruin.ucla.edu. 



<AMPUS Learn partner 
dances in Swing, Salsa and 
more in Adterman Union 
2406 from 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. 
Goto 

www.studentgroups.uda.e 
du/ballroomdance for inore 
mfo. 



. a 



•fILM "Cats and Dogs 
and "Scary Movie H" open 
in theaters nationwide 




10 



<AMfnJS Hammer 
Museum Films presents 
"Avant -Garde Film 
Rafiti«"attheUCLA 
Hamnter Museum 




n 



•CAMPUS Films of iames 
Wong Howe, with special 
guest John Frankenheimer, 
show it the jan)es Bridges 
Theater in Melnitz 
•FILM 'Final Fantasy: The 
Spirits Within' opens in 
^heaters nationwide 



•CAMPUS The Hammer 
Museum Concert "East 
Meets East" takes place at 
the UCLA Hammer Museum 



n 



•CAMPUS Films of James 
Wong Howe show in the 
James Bridges Theater in 
Melnitz 



•FILM 'Kiss of the 
Dragon' opens in theaters 
nationwide 



J 



7^ 



II 



ftiiu% 



•CAMPUS Hammer 
Museum Jazz Concerts 
features the John Pisano 
Tno plus guest Jeannie 
Pisano at the UCLA 
Hammer Museum 
•FILM "Legally Blonde" 
and 'The Score' open in 
theaters nationwide 



•CAMPUS The Movie That 
Inspired Me film series 
continues with James Ellroy 
at the James Bridges Theater 
in Melnitz 



•THEATER "Contact" 
opens at the Ahmanson 
Theater 




"A^ 



14 



•CAMPUS A fKeption for the 
Salvador Dali exhibition {a 500 
piece collection of works by 
Dali will be on display m 
Ackerman Grand Ballroom 
until July 27) wiH take placp to 
benefit pediatric genetic 
research at the UCLA School of 
MedKine 



15 



•MUSIC Girls Night Out 
with Reba McEntire and 
Martina McBnde takes 
place at 7 p.m. at the 
Staples Center. For more 
info, go to 

wwwticketmaster.com 
•J 

J 



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To advertise 
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18 Monda\ luK 2 2(K)I 



Dailv Brum Arts & Eatertaiiiiiient 



HOMER 

Vkiimen an- liaiiitd h\ ihc sk\ and 

.nc LM\i.-ii .I'n cpu nohiliiv .ind 

I hiv p.iiiitiiii.' I-- I lie t'om I'l tiK- n>l- 
^, ' m ^liiHv mi; Hi'tiK'i N impiirt.in! 

.>t .'• J:.i!,ulcr povilitiiiiri;.' .iiid poi 
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' '■ ■ . ■ ' 'iliii 'A .'Ik-. lU llldv' 

t J • 'i.i!:! n! ('. ill. i; .lu- hc.uililiii 

■'.. ,.-. '! ."!■'! .!lUl XnKVK.ll! 

I ■.;.!■'. I ■ ; ■ i|u \WA\\: "'I p.lMII 

'..;■ ■ ';.. :",.i;i; :.\!:it-<;i iIk';"i.- .hi- 
■ , . .L ;>Mt:i- !li,)i ■'(■.■! ,ulditi>'ii- 

• :. I !ii tH'Nl ill llU'^f 1^ IIk- (. I'lllCM 

k V AlK'fv p.iiiuinL'- troni 
I \t \1 \ ^ PLTiiKirKni ki>llc\lh'iurc- 

.1'., V:~l>M.^.ll ^.'lUi.'\l lilt H.'IIKT V 

V\ > ■ 1 K 

11k r>Hini tiKlutio p.imiiiii:^ aiul 
l;ih>ij:raph-. truni Homt-r and olhcr 
NuKTican and f uropcaii aili>ls 
Si'i miK d»i lhc> L'ttcvlivirK add to 
Hu .ipprcv-iatum >>I Hv>mcr s tech- 



niques, bui also as u group lhc> give 
a i!(H)d sense of where the an w»>rld 
si(K)d when Homer was working 

I he other two side exhibits are the 
Reading Room where \isilors can 
read (he exhibition catalog and learn 
additixnal inlormation about 
Honiei and the I ainii> 'ooni. which 
allows children tn learn the impor 
I. nice oi Ntale perspective and chai 
.Kier pLii.emeiit in a painiinj! Both 
.lie iiiieresiini; Mde stops alonj: the 
path <>t the exhibition 

Ml III all V^ln^l^•w Hoinei aiui 
the C riiic> l^ uell-^ialted and capii 
' aliiij; e\eii tliouiih it points out the 
!iarr.>v\niiiKlednes>- ol critiCN who 
rctoiini/e the iicniu^ of an artist but 
arc triisiraicd b\ his results 



M(T: Winslow Homer and tbe Critics 
Forging a National Art m the 1870s is 
at tbe Los Angeles County Museum of 
Art until Sept 9 Tickets are dated 
and timed, and allow access to all gal 
lenes and exhibitions On weekdays 
admission is S8 for students and $12 
tor adults on weekends it is $12 for 
students and $15 for adults Tickets 
can be purchased at the LAC MA box 
office or by calling (877) 522-6225 




MeffUpolil^r^ Muvrijni rjt An 



The painting "Eagle heacJ, Manchester, Massachusetts (High Tide)' by Winslow Homer is currently on 
display at the Los Angeles County Museurn of Art. 



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• Corrtputer latm 

• Car Loans - 

• Ar>d riKKr' 

Visit Hit Uwi w r w ty Credit Union 

A-LevH (across from tevtboola). 
Open your account today! 



MM: www.um.orK 
Ftione: (3I«) 477-M2$ 



StTvinj? ttH'lKlA (:nmmurftt\ Suh e ; •♦I I 



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Monday Julv 2. 2(M)1 



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Ws c rs l ional Actitnties 

WSBBf Ch Sutl >B CU 

S pei n i /Egg Donors 
TtokauOnimd 
TioholB Mtanle^ 
•ed 



I hn I PsiK inis 
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Books 
ICaWngCanIs 

I / Camcordefs 

/Sofl«Mi« 

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RMosicaf Instmmafits 
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Los Angeles CA 90024 



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47S-K71 Ciaa*adaa»aK)ia)in im-lt«iwi»y atufciiwycla.an) Willi > 

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> 0* ««y ongx race laa or saual onanuiian ir a 
1 any 01 m* jancas animtnidor nw 



A 



iKKnaiior ^Mad haian itmm communicaie convaMs « wnna Hi Mia AiaaiaM OmcKv 

•BiiaFaH 



inr UCLA Housng Ofkca ai OiOl 876-4771 or ctf ttw WtHIMa Fa« MOMnv CMC at (310I 
.usiiKnws and s not guaranMad r><« DaHy Brian IS lawonMHi tor mr tesi mconKt. 
.in ■nor on Itw tast day Ol puMcJMn |>y noon 



fTT^T^T'T' 



2200 

Research Subjects 



2200 

Research Subjects 



announcements 



J-ZDUU 



1100 

Campus Happenings 



DAILY MORNING 
MEDITATION 

WEEK OF JULY 9 13 6 OOBfn-9 00am 
Acherman Union •240fl 310 313 3913 



Condom Study 

Loving couples wanted to home test 
an altern ati v e condom iviaterial 

Earn $140 f(3r participating 

Couples must be - 

▼ Age : 8-45 V In a stable reMortstilc mtri ore partner 

^ willing to report on 8 condorr uses 

▼ Current user jf Birtn Control Pills lUD, Norplant, Depc, or 
Sterllttatlon 



For more Iniornwtlon please can 800-521 -52T 1 
or vistt our wwtoslte at ^Mwm teste ondoms org 



ro o o o o o 




travel 

5£00-5720 



S700 

Travel Tickets 



Alcoholics Anonymous 

Fn. Saf Study 3S17 Adnmian 

M/T/Wftn.OanMlAXnf 
«M. kK. DmM A3 (OS 

MliaHi 12:10 140^ 



1800 

Miscellaiifuus 



ON CAMPUS BANKING 

Your oncampus & onhne tirtarKiai services 
source for students faculty & staff Visit us at 
Ackermsn A Iswsl. orvkne at «vww ucu org or 
ca« 310-477^ 



2000 

^^ersoiials 



MEET YOUR 
MATCH 

1-900 329-8220 Ext 3626 3626 3627 
3626 $2 99pern«n Must be 16 yrs Serv U 
619-6S4-8434 



2300 

Soerm ' Eaa Donor-; 



Pay your tuition 
with eggs. 



if you're a woitian between 18 

and ^f>. ynu can earn money casi 

Iv. anonymously Donate your 

eggs to an mlemlc couple 

$.S.O0() aiKl up. depending on 

vou education and other qualiti 

cations ("all Tctday 

The Center for Egg Options 
3I0/S46-6786 

•T*ir Cenvrr tar E^q Optiont lU 



2200 

* Siih|fi ts 



RELATIONSHIPS AND 
SEXUALITY SURVEYS 

PARTICIPANTS NEEDED Inr sevean anony 
mous wisb^MSSd surveys Both couptss srK) 
singles r>««<ls<l See http //studies i in 
pod com 



Egg Donors Needed 

Healthy ttw.iles .jRt's lM-28 
wishing; 1(1 help intertile ( (>uplt"< 

f Call MiRNA (818)832 1494 . 



FREE 
DIABETB 



K^aa, 



n»-se 



MCfXittt 

oM)tor 



orsi gkicose tolsi a ii u s tsst 9.S hours) 

OusMtsd subtscts Isrtio pass fhs orsi 

gkicose tolsr sww mi m0 haw nonnal 

Mood pisssMMl «• be biwllsd to 

m a BMisac shirtv of 

91 SO 



IlKCMBOMhl 



Healthy UCLA Student under 28 
Chinese or Japanese 

$5,000 

For details please contact Mamy 
mamytamtlle O dream com 



^900 

Autos fof Sale 



1978 DATSUN 280Z Sspeed classic silver 
w/burgundy mohair interior Excellent corxti 
tion engine rebuilt Alpine stereo SSOO(> 
Steve 323-2910446 

1987 HONDA CIVIC HATCHBACK Good 
Condition runs nvell 180.000 mites 5-speed 
manual an am/fm $1,500 Judy 310-825 
8930 days 

19eB MITSUBISHI MONTERO 4WD 2DR 
AC AM/FM CD Good cooditioo $2900 
310-966 1968 

1990 PEARL WHITE JAOUAR XJ6 Loi* 
mMes excelleni condition new tires Musi 
sell $9500/obo Call Viney 714 299-4796 

1991 TOYOTA COROLLA VERY RELI 
ABLE 4 door automatic A/C Radio Cas 
sette 240K miles Runs Groat Good Condi 
lion interior and extenor. Dark Blue $2300 
Must sell' 310-442-0237 Icarbo 
neliVit>binc com 

1994VWJETTA 

White 4-dcx>r manual sunroof A/C ne^ 
tires new brakes great condition 
ii3 000mi $4900/obo Call Robert 310-403 
1401 or yesrobOholmail com <mail to yes 
robOhotmail com> 

1998 AUTOMATIC HYUNDAI ACCENT Air 
conditioned under 48. COOK Excellent CD 
player Perfect tor a student' A must see' 
$5550 310-860-1578 

MOVING Must Sell" i9«9 Toyota Camry 
S3.000 120 000 miles excellent condition 
A/C CO registered through 2002 Call now' 

POLICE IMPOUNDS Hondas as low «•- 
$500 tor listings 1 BOO 319-3323 ext A^14 



S300 

Scooter ' Cycle Repait 



AQUA TRAVEL INC 



WORLD WIDE LOWEST AIR F ARES 

Lowest Domestic and 

Internationoi Airfares 

Tour Packages 

Eurailpass 

Hotel Accommodations 

Car Rentals 

•Asia*A»rica'Ausltol«a*Eurooe*Soum 
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PHONE ^10) a3&«}25 



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PABfS $«« 




2600 

lA/.intrd 



KOREAN TRANSLATORS WANTED ASAP 
Strong experience required Contact rmchi 
ro •■language com or 310-452-S611 SHt 
1015 

RECEP. WANTED 

BH CO hssvy phones pan ofNce 

FuM-Mns Can 310-aM-ano 




a* EXCHANOC AO P0« FfWE MCK-UPa 
a m^AM, on mmCMASE OtSCOUMT ■ 

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■ ^es S La C-rmgt BM ba Bioola Soul^ ol Pko a 



SUMMER 
SPECIALS 
Call Now 

VfCTORYTRAVEL COM 



u 



•-mall im:torytrs««<9aartMink wt 




2(1 Mondjv iuK 2 2(»01 



2300 

Sperm / Egg Donors 



Daily Bruin CbMsificd 



2300 

bpf^m tgg Donors 



2300 

>>perm Lgg Donors 



2300 



Special Egg Donor IVeeded 

Preferred Donor wiB meet the following criteria: 

•Height Approximately 5'(r or Taller •Caucasian 'SAT. 
Score around 1300 or High A.C.T. •College Student or 
Graduate Student Under 30 •No Genetic Medical Issues 



Compensation 




Paid to you andA>r the charity of your choice- 
All related expenses will be paid in addition to 

your compensation. 

(Extra compensation available for someone who might be especially 
gifted in athletics, science/mathematics or music. )" 



For more information or to obtain an ^plication please 
contact Michelle at the Law Office erf Gr^ L Erikses 

(800)808-5838 
or email E^DonorInfo@a(dxonL 



*This ad is being placed for a particular client and is not soliciting eggs for a donor banL 




6000 

Insurance 



me Insurancp Se'vicps 



Motorcycte • Motor Scooter • Moped g 

■ 
t 



. Am !•> iNStlHANCt B THf I «W 

'' '< LESS iH«N vou thmr' 



6200 

Hf. iltt' St^rvices 



COSMETIC & 

FAMILY 
DENTISTRY 

Denial exam+x-ray+cteansing $40 TeeWi 
wtirtenmg $75/arc^ 10921 WMshire "SOS 



No ^pdOTq' Call fo» a tT«» quote' 

(310) 27S-«734 ; 

1 •souri ««i "iMiKoc.- i'u.,^».- ■ ^u■824 0O5^ «»¥»w *»eslladentist colfn 0' 

Moe Shammaie 



6500 

1^-" :sif Lesson*- 



DRUM LESSONS 

ALL LEVELS/STYLES wnlfi dwJicalWl pro 
tessional Al yoof tiome of WLA studio isi 
lesson tree No drum Ml nscessary 
Nwl 323-654-8226 



6600 

Personal Services 



S900 

Financial Aid 



STUDENT LOANS 

, :.: B!a!' ,'•; L Id' •' n J-.ivp'sitv ( ■<•') 
'' ' . ••' 0-- i. di H4. 1; . ^f> f»- ,r 



61 OO 

Computer/ Internet 



$11.99/MONTH 

I/NIIMITED INTERNE' ACCESS 'of only 
$1' 99'monm N{ Ads No Busy Signals 
Call 818 762 :i467 Of visit vi«»w bulldoghosi 
inq com 



6300 

Legal Advice/Attorneys 



•BANKRUPTCY* 

GET OUT OF DEBT KiOW' Era* Consolta 
lion Experienced attorneys reasor>aDte 
te«s tCheryte M Wtwe UCLAW 86") BOO 
420 9998 PiayOveiland WLA 



BEAR'S RESEARCH, 
WRITING & EDITING 



Pai- 

int».fnattor»a Slaotf :s ^A/t+Kiijmt :■>■■ ^■- ' ^; 

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6150 

Foreign Language 



6000 

Insurance 




/lllstate 



Mtke A^e' >• 



I'. )' 1' . ■ Atjci .■ V I' 



(310) 3)2-0202 

' ?» I W/^stvv/' ■' w1 HIv 1 

C? t>ll«s ••• • ^V/.>M .!'•■) 

34 Movjrs O 1 MJy !^^fVK,*^ 



Translations 
AM Languages! 

(IIPlOMAS TRANiSv_.WIf^; -, FT. 

Ceftification & MotanzatKjr 
Tet (310)260-7700 
Fax (310)?6O-7706 

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6^00 

Movers 'StM'U)f 



JERRY S MOVING4DELIVERY The carelul 
movers EMperwnced rehatiie same -day de 
hvery Pachmg. tx>ies available Also pick 
up donations for Arrwncan Caricef Society 
:)errye310 391 5657 




W«4»*Wayt 7 }(i tn M tM\ywmi Otntt Oiit»r 

117 N HighliiiU *•» <cTM«iii( M«lrM*> 

i333» »4« n«l 



6500 

Music Lessons 



VOICE PIANO LESSONS hv prolessional 
singar/ptamst JuiUtard Scrtooi MM All lavels 
310-544 1240 



Since 1970 
ING/EOITING 



6700 

Prn(pssion<tl Servire< 



PROFESSIONAL WRIT 



lions gr 



Any 



Classifieds 
825-2221 



67 OO 

Protessional Services 



PR(H)FRE\II[N(, s[R\|(E^ 

^( Kl' ' ^ \ \M MS 



f\\|(ihLls]\^(ll(Ds 



FORMER ENGLISH 
TEACHER 



W/ MMan Irom U-Chca0i. 
cesaas dlaaanatior>s 
plays personal 
national studanis 
829-6171 



ird pfo- 

screan 

miar 

6 310- 



HOUSEWORK 

RECENT COLLEGE GRAD does houae- 
iMoilt exienor anchor inienor $i5/TKHir Lois 
ot espenance Releiences upon request 
HousesMtmg also available ChnstopnerSiB- 
749-6162 



CREATIVE EXPERTISE 

FOR MEDICAL 

SCHOOL 

Personal Staterrients Secorxlanes Person- 
alized professional service Dissertation, 
editing Imatazing Ace Words Etc 310-820- 
8830 



hl 



Perjonol Stalefnenfs, Popers, TKeses, 
Dissertofions. Books, & Proposols 

Comprehensive Kelp by PhD from UC 
International Students Welcorrte 



fuaiuB^im 




jimmmiumiivTiiHHMiupt, 



I InhappyPTimi? Drained? H 

May^ it's hrcmue muvtmttes liht 
I ICLAkmrtk^smitfDncwU. 
http*7/l 'niversity'secrets.com 



TTTTTT 1 1 "j rr 3.3 m 



f-rrT~rr3-rTy-3~3~rr\ 



7000 

luuiniuj Ottert- 



ENGLISH EXPERT 

DOES WRrriNG IN CIIBLIII iwlw 

paper coMpMMi ESL eKpan- 
310-276-6382«Mam 



MATH TUTOR 

I Mor SAT matti Pre-AigrtHi. AlgMra 1 and 
2. Geometiy. Tngonomalfy. and bajjwwwn g 
Calculus UCLA Student matti-relaled 
maior Five yam ai^anance tuionnB 
and two yaan mcfimg ex 
$25/TK)ur al my home Saomour M yours Call 
for more intorrriation SMphaniaSl 0-702- 
6455 

PIANO LESSONS and expaflanced private 
tutor lor ESL proof-reading any 
reading/wntting skills Reasonable rales 
Flexible location Hamei Qitter 310-837 
0887 

WRITING TUTOR 

HARVARD GRAD literature PHD sludent. 
published wnter will Iwtp w a aarctvornte/edil 
your papers in any subiact aiiot02i38eya 

two com 

WRITING TUTOR 

KIND AND PATIENT Stanford graduate 
Help with the Englia^ language— lor stud 
ems of all agas/leveiii 310-440 3ii 6 



7100 

Tjtorinc) W.ifiic 



TEACH THE SATs ^ 



Need energetic people with 

High SAT .scores to prep 
students 1-on- 1 or m classes 
All regions $ 1 S- j2S/hr Flex 
hours Car needed Call Tom 

310-448-1744 
www.tiitoriobs.cofii 



Display 



,' Daily Bniin Classified 



Monday. July 2. 2(N) I 21 



5680 

Triivel Destifuitioiis 



5680 

Travel Deslitiiitmiis 



7700 

Child Care lA/amed 



STUDENT TRAVEL 



fflmipYiCOTaEMiD 




iMiM $S71 

^■ris $••• 

Sfistf IttS 

Imssslt $tli 

Aatttriaa. . . .$tfl3 

sm jMt, CI. ..Sin 

Faraa «r« rounc^inp rt— uiuw may app*if 
T— not nrlii<iil c«t VIO-^ 7MO40 

■r— 7 ^ 





318.KULHr ar iSI7S5 ffrM campiit 



I 


3QTRA¥EL 


www statravel com L 



PT CHILDCARE 

Foi Very special 6yr oia oaugr^ie' intet 
national or t>ilingual background pie 
terred car&re4erer«:es required Grand 
Piano Beverlywood Laird 310 287 

1677 



SITTER NEEDED lor 3-year-old hwn gins 
Weekend ntghls and one atternoorvwaek 
Piaaae can Sandy:3i 0-573- 1047 



7800 

Hel^i Wanted 



A PERFECT STUDENT 
JOB!!! 

AFTERI«X>NS DURING SCHOOL Fulltime 
dunng Quarter Breaks and Summer Vaca 
lions' Work al Itie most faiTKNJS tennis shop 
in LA Wortt experience not necessary Mini- 
mum pay $7 50/hf "Stnng tof tf>e 
pros'TA/estwood Sporting Goods 1065 Gay 
ley Ave 310 208-6215 

ANMAL LOVER 

NEEDED lo ftelp care for numerous animals 
in private i>o(tie Well cared tor fiexitMc.- 
hours SISmour (negotiat>le) 818-763-0470 

ANYONE CAN DO THIS Work around your 
school schedule $500-$i500/month Part 
lane 818-751 7951 



BANKING 



7100 

Tulorinci WUnnted 



TLTTOR WANTED lor Irestwnan lawal high 
sctwol m Engkah and Math T— ctwngwwha 
smae UptoS20AH CaM 310423-6091 



7200 



WORD PROCESSING a^aemm^ m 
es dwsertakons iianacapllan. tap 
raaumes. IHers. brochures, mailing lists re 
pons 310-82e-«939 



7700 

Child Care Wanted 



NANNY/BABYSITTER 

m home tor 3 kids 6.2 5 newAnm $8 
i2/tK>ur. Prr salary nagoHaMa Growing 
hours Musi have car Pfilsr CPf< training 
310-342-0011 



P/T teller/new accounts positions at Univers 
ity Cradn Urwon Excellent pay. ttours & envi 
ronment Some ei^Mnence preferred Apply 
at 1500 S Sapulveda Bivd LA. 90025 Fax 
resume 310-477 2S66 or on web 
wwMv ucu org/|abs.t«lni 



Are you o model 



Looking tor all lypev 

niak/lemalc iimdcls/aciofN 

We alM) have Plus »izc &. Oiildrcn (li» 

Fttr pnni A imn-unMNi kummcTciate 

Niu*ificnciicr m^unvd Noten 




7800 

Help Wanted 



\i' hxfm-nriiii- \i\i-\.\iin 

Mni Vmini. eki W i i ii M nfo m*^ 

nun 1\ Mnb (irnimnn^ Uan-t/'"^ 

fitr lirr\iiiiiil iiitcn iiti nil! i/.«/ 

310.659.7000 




unic{ue job opportunitij 



7700 

Child C;iri Wiinled 



BABYSITTER 

WANTED P/T waalida 

SiS^NMir Near csmpw 2 

arKe naoaaaary PImh cs> SusanneSIO- 

441 t 550 



CHILDCARE WANTED 
i«> dMfMar tram achaol 

8088 


Muat Dnwe Pk* 
Payllmaaeliillni 
■«•« 310471- 


EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER lor 5 »td 9 
occaaionai waamgMi Mimi haw loial ral- 
310-418-8413 



FEMALE STUDENT to BabyaM tor 2 yrotd 
gwl Muat be Playtui and EnafgalK. have 
cttNd caia aapartanoa, aMoaMani r ale r a n e es 
and own car e-KNwaAMk Cloaa to UCLA 
$9Ah 310-205-0903 



7500 

'(iporliiiiitif- 





fterihte k^mrs 
mimimmt'time 
e9mmitememt 



$600 per m^ntk 



If you're male, in good health, in 
college or have a college degree, and 
would like a flexible job where you can 
earn up to $600 per month AND set 
your own hours, call 310-824-9941 
for information on our anonymous 
sperm donor program. Receive free 
health screening and help infertile 
couples realize their dream of 
becoming parents. 



7500 

•pporliinities 



Advertising Opportunities 

The Jewish Journal s advertising sales 
department is expanding We are looking to fill a 
variety of positions from experienced Account 
Executives to entry level Sales Ass(H'iates. Strong 
interpersonal skills required. Knowledge of the 
Jewish Community a plus. 



CAFE/BRENTWOOD 
GOO0$$ 

Flemble hours Great afnosphere Bngnt 
onergetic Inendly people wanted 
PT/FT/Weekend positions availatiip tor 
mgmi counter and t>ansia positions I2()P^ 
Wilshire Blvd Brentwood Apply today 







CAREGIVER WANTED 

For 13-yaar-old txiy with down syr>dTome for 
month ol July Education or special edut:H 
tion maior preferred 310-271 4 — 

CHILDREN'S STORE 

HELP WANTED Near Westside pavilinn 
P/T t ami 310 y>4 1896 



i5-20hrsAMk Computer hierate and organ 
iMd tSttr Branlwood law olhce 310-820 



Classifieds 
825-2221 



TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD PUZZLE 



ACROSS 

1 Decseit 



raEVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED 



11 HopsorMsrtoy 

14 Mo0*t-a«ptane 
wood 

15 Pac* 

16 Hi^ cart 

17 Ou nwiss 
ie Attired hke 

Suparman 
iSSauR-Mvw 
20 Eymttmtom 
22ChiUm 
24 Art musaunn 
28 Strassas 

30 Conaacrate 

31 LUtaapaacock'' 

32 Caras for 

33 Paint the town rad 

37 Rocky Mountain 
nativa 

38 Like tabloK) 
haadlinas 

ae Walar. m 




72-01 



t- 2001 uniao i^aaiura Synoi^aie 



40 Dtamond cow 
43 Polite 

45 OM Norse 
mscnptons 

46 Ralar(to) 

47 Ra«s 

50 FofBver young 

51 Dolphins home 

52 Housapan 

53 Calendar abbr 

54 Kitchan«d 

57 High-flying toys 

62 Rnal letter 

63 Happening 

64 Siiv*r Piat 

65 Convamtiortal 
pauaas 

66 Rraar-mouth 
formation 

67 Prom eg 



Blad.asaootor 35 



Sitcom alien 
Function 
Dims ttw light 
SonMhy 



Scamp 
Cock nays 



■mount 



10 

11 Sink 

1 2 Choral group 

13 Pub orders 
21 Ftdc s treat 

23 Oiva up (Iwid) 

24 Range 

25 AcHwa Ekbarg 

26 NonaocMl 
pareon 

27 Jar oovar 
26 'Catch-ar 

star 
29Coltagagin 
31 EiflalToMiar 



36 

36 

41 

42 
43 



46 
47 
46 
49 

50 
52 
55 
56 
56 

59 



Invasions 

Winter 

festivals 

Type ot moth 

Infant's 

wrhaais'' 

Want over ttw 

books 

Worked for a 

judge 

Down yyith tfie 

flu 

In tfta past 

Surprise 

More mature 

Stable 

occupants 

Hean outlet 



"- haditr 
Qibson or Ott 
Lupmo of 
films 
Bronze 
component 



DOWM 

1 -Moat wanted 
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Displa' 
206-"" 



22 VIondjN. .)ul\ 2, 2<H»| 



Dait>' Bruin C iMMf ied 



7800 

Help M/anted 



COMPUTER RESEARCHER/ADMIN AS 
SISTANT PT 24hrs wK of full time Student 
«Mth tieabte hours<ptatere grad student or 
recent grad > Capable or researching differ 
ent types ot accounting software tor pur 
ctiase Help wlt^ mstiiation and data input 
PC/IMS savy Detail oriented Self Starter 
AtXe to work wlt^ little supervision Type SO. 
60-> words per minute Good communication 
skills Please send hours ol availability dur 
ring summer and school year Help 
Research and purchase accounting/time 
management software lor protect manage 
meni alor>g with general office duteis tor 
small West LA arcruteclure firm. $10-iS/hi 
DOE 310-286-9375 

DRIVING INSTRUCTOR 

WANTED Full-time or part-time Westwood 
dnving and traffic school Call lor intorma 
lion 310-206 3333 

F/T OFFICE ASSISTANT 

Wanted Work rn Westwood medical office 
Must t>e proficient in HAS Word and Ua^^ ex 
cetient organizational skiHs $8/hr to stan 

Fax 310-657 7716 

FEMALE FIGURE 

Or lite drawing models wanted by photogra 
pher Call Peter at 310-558-4221 

FILE CLERK/ASSISTANT 20hr/week Law 
tirm m Century City Must have one-year 
commitment Fiiing/taxingrcopymg/other du 
ties Willing to pay $l0/hr Fax Resume 
310 5535037 

HOUSEKEEPER/HOME OFFICE ASSIS 
TANT lor t>usy doctor Weekends Laun 
dryrieaning assist wcooking etu No skills 
required Great pay' Flexible schedule 
Leave rnessage 310 967 5180 

LEADERS WANTED 

SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEUR seeks 
iikemmded big thinkers' INT L opp 323-964 

5702 

LEASING ASST AND 
SECRETARY 

For Real Estate Co Word arw Excel e« 
peri«*nce regd Will assist the President 
Cotd calls sriow vacarK:ies typing tibng 
create reports set appointments kx:ai e' 
rands Full time <-t>enefits BlB-907-oaOO 
exi 306 or tax resume 818-907-0787 

LOOK CLOSELY 

PT WORK F 1 PAY Bnghi students wanted 
Culver City office Generous salary plus 
commission Good« phone voice Gra 
ham 310-837 OSOSext 174 

MARBLE CARE CO Seeking Technicians 
FT Positions Benefits Los Angeie* Area 
Please Call 818 757 0013 

MEDIA OPENNING 

WEST SIDE Law Firm seeks PT reception 
pst Afternoons Phone-^assist as needed 
Outgoing piersonality Previous expenence a 
plus 818 78fl 4368 

MEDICAL FRONT OFFICE position lor busy 
Beverly HMis dermatology practice Variety oi 
duties PT References required Call Diane 

3ir 273-046" 

MNJJONAIRE MINDED? 

Entrepreneur -m-kks iwi pdr imit individuals 
to make $1997 m the r>ext two weeks Um 
Dene 1 866-483-0983 

MONEV MANAGEMENT FIRM m Brent 
woi>n st?Mtiing (jarr lime executive assistan* 
nterestfrl in "lotiey rridnagemen! Reterenr 
ys 'Hq.jned Please CdH 800-696-44 71 

OFFICE MANAGER entry level will train 
lull lime M F 4-6 '0 minutes Irom UCLA 
C'lmDule' Knowledge required Saiarybene 

Ms ;r. 476-420'^ 

OPERATION"^ ASST (Electronics Co . PT 

WLA ._:.i; to- rlfllails TIO 478-0591 



7800 

Help Wanted 



P/T¥lfRfTER/ 
RESEARCHER 

Must have engineer science background 
$ii/hourfor magazine 310-917 1120 

RECEPTIONIST tWESTWOOD LAW OF- 
FICES Fridays 9-5 $8Awur Can do home- 
work on |ob 310-473-4525 

RELAX I. IMAGINE 

Research study especiaHy seeking ttwse 
with panic-disorder/panic -anxiety attacks 
though not required Contact Chns Nikolai 
dK. PhD Candidate chns O fuller edu 626- 
584 5535 

RETAIL SALES 

PT/FT Sepulveda Blvd Designer wed- 
dmg/evenmg gowns Expenence preferred 
motivated and triendty Great opportunity 
Salary/commis*ions/tx)nuses ExceHeni $$ 
310-474 7808 Pauline 

SCULPTOR SEEKING DRIVING COMPAN 
ION to Ann Arbor Michigan Leaving July 
14th Returning by July 24tri 818-686-9006 
rssiyrwiAearthlink net 

SERVER/HOST(ess) 

Hinng for tun & fast-paced Asian cale Cen- 
tury City Apply Yin Yang 10250 Santa Moni 
ca Blvd a/f 2pm 310-556-3333 

STUDENT ASSISTAfJT $9 75/hr Work stu- 
dy -ekgible General office duties/assist in re- 
search (coding/data entry) Great opportuni- 
ty to learn business resaarch Details, 
call 310-794-0422 

TEACH IN SOUTH 
KOREA 

English Language Teachers Free airfare 
tree housing medical insurance paid vaca 
tion severance package No Korean neces 
sary $1400 1500/month Send photo/re 
sume KoreaConnectVyatioo com BA/6S 
required Travel Asia' 

TWO POSITIONS LAW OFFICE ASSIS 
TANT in Santa Mon«a PT flexible hours 
$10/hr PERSONAL^OFFICE ASSISTANT in 
Pacilic Palisades 20 mins from UCLA 15 
30hrs/»»k flexible $lO/hr Tami 310-459 
2087 

VIDAL SASSOON ACADEMY Model Call 
July 5th and t2th between 6 7 pm 321 San 
ta Monica Blvd We are kx>king for fastnon 
forward girts who want to update or revive 
ttieir look All Models must be open to a com- 
plete change-Cut & Color Payment Opporiu 
nities or free services lor 6-montfis Must tw 
available July 2i 22 For turttier details caN 
310-255-0011 em 1 

WANTED PART TIME 
HOUSEKEEPER 

Light Housekeeping Cook dinner and 
Disties Monday-Friday 4 -9pm July 30 
Sept 4 $45/day Karen Daytime 323-661 
1330 Evening 310-657 1660 



8000 



GAY-FRIENDLY INTERNS NEEDED for na 
tiorwily distributed gay mens lifestyle and 
entertainment magazine lOhrs/wk ur^paid 
Fax resume 323-467-8300 



8300 

Uulunlei" 



VOLUNTEER OPPOR- 
TUNITIES 

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED at Hostelling 
International m SM Meet and interact w/trav 
eiers trom all around the world' Call Lucy at 

4t(, iq-i-rjgi^ ext 18 



summerbruin 

E V E K Y MONDAY 




Throughout the 

summer the 

.Summer Brum will 

be published on 

Mondays only 



mk 



On-Campus 
(310) 206-7562 



(Sid 




Classifieds 
825-2221 



call 

310.825.2161 



Advise' 




wamams 

tudent-lD-student deals tJ 



Even Monday, the Daily Bruin Classifieds provides Bruin Bargains, a place where 

students are able to advertise absolutely FREE* some of the best deals in Westwood. 

Check weekly for updates so you don't miss out on great savings! 



Descrifytloffi 



laLQO. 




To place a I 

ad in iht Hmin 

KarKains. fill out 

information on the 

nj»ht and submit to the 

[)ail\ Hruin (iiassifieds 



■O^KWXIH ■!■■ 



I ■■ t u tmmnm- 



• Item 

( I S characten maximum. indiNttng ^hkxs) 

• Descnptiofi _»««^*p. 

(20 characters maximum, including ipaoes) 

•Pnce ] 

(exampif S2S. r4ei, FREE Ffe* inund In the nearest dollar- NO ORO) 

• Phone ( ) 



•*l must l»r M*mi«fd m f*nnn or hv mwl No plni«H iwrtrtv aHomwl Urartlinr h : mofii (t^^^ pnnr in wur at I ipni Ml Hnmi Bantaim j(i|iwr wm *oim7id« 
aixl Kmlax I mm iil 4 trw a* prr cuMnnifr per tirrk In- wwrn- tin nithi iii mm: or i«|Rt an\ ad»wir«ninii iM mmtnf, ttir vmrAvt^ <* tl»' I ttih Hniiii 



Display 
206-30t.u 



Dail> Bruin Classtficd 



M«.iMld\. JuK 2, 2(K)I 2?> 




8^00 

Apartnienls tot Rent 



1-MINUTETOUCLA 

1 bdrm. lumwhed clean secuniy entrance 
large' cloaels laurKlry room, pool tyr lease 
$120(Vnio 310-824 1830 

1380 VETERAN ibdmvibni $i395<f»eg) 

Park vMw. rooftop pooUiacuzzi. imercofn tr\ 

Hy, fUM parking laundry all appliances 

MiM»Hn ASAP Gats considered 310-477 

Sifli .. _ ; ■ ■ ; .,. ■ .;. ;, '■ -; 

1380 \/ETERAN-2bdm>/2blh $t895(negy 
Park view, rooftop pooi/|acuz2i intercom en- 
try, gated parking, laundry all appt«nces 
NkMe-m ASAP Cats considered 310-477 
5108 

BEL AIR conage pet ok hanlMiood floors 
parking $946 w«vw westsiderentals com 
310-395RENT 

BEVERLY HILLS ADJ Japanese garden 
itidrm w/separaie entrary:e tbth in fwuse 
Excellent tor student $595 rent reduced 
wmelp 2t)ed/2t>aih $1795 Or OawK) 323 
936 1449 

BEVERLY HILLS ADJ Pico/Creccenl 
HM^Maafea 2t>drm2bth h4ewhome Front 
and backyard w/ Japanese gairtan Wtash 
mfOrfm A/C $1795 I3avid 323-936-1449 

BEVERLY HtLLS apadmeni pal ok. ladig- 
eratoi stove utilities inckided $775 310- 
395-RENT wnMir westsiderentals com 



I liouae iMlh view pet ok. maid 
1800 310-386-RENT www wastSMl- 
erenMB.com 

NEAR UCLA ibdrm wood Moors new pami 
i-yaar HasB. $iOOO/month B ufW buMng 
AiBMatlH now* Betty 310-479-8646 

PALMS IBDRM IBTH $92S/mo Newty 
painted, gated parking, intercom )acuz2i 1/12 
t)lock to UCLA bus Kay 310-842 9127 

PRIME SAKITA MONICA 3 btocfcs to tieach 
Bachetor $425 310 395-RENT 
sideremais com 



SANTA MONICA 3t>drms 
wastier parking $1999 
www westsiderentals com 



1 1/2 bath dnh- 
3t0395-BENT 



SANTA MONICA ad| gusat house Yard in- 
cludes cable tv utihties mOutat $790 310- 
395 -RENT «www westSNtaraMais.cofn 



SANTA MONICA apartment, cat ok utiMies 
310- 395-RENT www west 
icom 

SANTA MONICA house 3bdfms. hartlwood 
•aaia oltice 2 car gangs S2000 310-395 
fCNT www DvaaWtfanniMs com 

SANTA MONICA houae. untumished. ibdrm 
cat ok hardwood noon, yanl $1085 310 
39S-RENT wwwwaaisidaianMscain 

SANTA MONICA HOUSE 2t)drms hard- 
wood floors, yard $1750 310-395-RENT 

SAI4TA MONICA spwlous aMtms. 1 12 
bath. waaongdManoe to beadt $1275 310- 
395-RENT www wesl B ideferW a l i cow 



LEVERING ARMS 

Large Sunny 

Singles & 1 Bedroom 

Apartments 

Walk to S<-tiool and Villane- 
No Ppts 

(310) 208-3215 

667-669 Levering Ave 
Near Glcnrcxk 



BRENT MANOR 
APIS 

Avoifl W'osIwivhI reniK 
I mil.- to UCI-A 

Sinjtios 

I ti:'2 DcdrooiiiR 

I*«»ol. Near Ihis line 

No prts 

1235 Federal Ave. 

Near WiUhirc Blvd 

■ (510) ^77-7237. 



bUISSltlt'Ob 



8UOO 



ApHmnent'- t ,■ K 



L>RGE STUDIO/CjAHUEN GUESTHOUSE 
Newly redone in Deaulilul rasidenliai area 
near UCLA Pertect tor quiet young proles- 
Sionai or grad student $1125 310-474 
4435 310-273-8986 

BRENTWOOD ADJ. 

2tx)rrTv2t)lh $1490 Lease to two Nc pets 
i'4ear tMilshire/Bundy/UCLA Bngtit upper 
with Balcony 1236 McCtaaan Dr 310-826 

8461 

BRENTWOOD ad| apartment Pet oh up 
per gated parking $725 3 tO 395-RENT 
i.com 



8U00 

ApHnnteiits l(jr Kill' 



8400 

Aparrments to; ken; 



Apartnienls K,. Krii' 




BRENTWOOD TOWNHOUSE hardwood 
lloors a/c parkmg $1050 310 395-RENT 
www westsiderentals com 

BRENTWOOD $1700 2bd/2t)m front bal 
cony retngerator/stove/dishwastter. car 
pet/drapes paikir^ laundry no pets, near 
UCLA Dyappt 11728 Maylie«d«1. 310-271 
6811 ^^^^ 

COZY 2 BEOROO*^ 1 bath $1240 Brent 
wood Ad| Near Wilshire/freeway/UCLA 
Lease to two No pels Patio 1333 Barry 
Avenue 310-826-8461 

CULVER CITY traditianai apartment retng 
erator. stove parking utilities included 
$500 www westsiderentals com 

GREAT LOCATION!!! 

SHERMAN OAKS Junior One Bedroom 
tadliacent A/C Walk to pubkc trans 
i8 alwpping $925 (mdudir^ uMi 
has) 818 788-0004 




• • 



APARTMENTS 
GLENROCK 

AND 
LEVERING 

Smele. 1&2 
Ktrdroom Apartments 

|- 3 Blocks Id Campus 

Rooftop Sundeck & 
Spa 

Fitness Room 

Study l.ounitf 

Laundrv Paciiities 

Gated Assigned 
ParkinK 

Indtviduii alarm 
systems 

MUCH MUCH more: 
RESERVIYOUR 

APARTMENT NOW! 
SIMMER 01 
F.ALL 01-02 



El Greco 

10)0 Tiverton Ave. 

■ Central air A heat 

■ Rooftop sundeck A tenure area 

■ B>lcoi>y bay window 

■ Sauna, ouidoor patio 8 bsrttecuc t 

■ Fully equipped Eaercne room 

(310)824-0463 



Heart of Westwood Village! 




Kelton Plaza 
430 Kelton Ave. 

■ Central air A heat 

■ Rooftop spa A leisure area- 

■ Balcony or patio 

■ Firepiacc 

(310)824-7409 



UCLA 




Midvale Plaza 

$27 & $40 Midvale Ave. 

■ Central air A heat 

■ Aaol. re c re at ion raem-fl^lnaaOTa 

■ Bakony or patio 

■ Sauna Ai^ 

■ Fu% aquip^ad £a e rci«a room 




(310)208-0064, 208-4868 



Walk to: 

( amp us 

kfsiaurants 

Theatres 

Shops 



LARGE 2BO/2BA. Upper comer unit $1650 
Near UCLA Has bakxmy/lull kilctian. waMi-in 
closets gated entry 6-r««onlti laaae okay 
Clean quiai. WBland:3i0'390-46l0 



LARGE 3BEDIMATW Owner s umt Large 
balcony, fireplace and wet bar All appliarx: 
es Gated entry close to UCLA on Brockton 
Roland 310 390-4610 

' ' ' ' «' ■ ■ — — — I. J— . .1 

tWESTWOOD guest house it>drm w/d. 
yard parking utilities $850 310 395-RENT 
www westsiderentals com 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE 
TOP LOCATION 



WALK TO UCLA 

wy\fw. keltontowers.com 

310-208-1976 



Di 



1-bdrm $ll00/nx)nth All uliMies and 
one parking included Days 310-475 7533 
evenings 310-659-4834 



Casablanca West 
Available NOW 

1 Bedrooms from S1195 
Bachelors $795 



530 Vetei^n 
208-4394 



.nu-» Apd'-trm'nt ir "thr Hi-^- 



West LA. living atitsbesL^ 




' Close to theatrvs. shops & rntaurants 

♦ BeaulituI architectural details throughout 

♦ One A two tiedroom apartment homes 

♦ New designer interiors 

♦ Gourmet kitchen 

♦ Built in appliances 

♦ State-of-the-art fitness center 

♦ Roof-top sun deck A spa 

♦ Controlled access A Rated parking 

♦ Extensive Resident services 



Call Today! 

(310)479^205 
10983 Wellworth Ave 
Los Angeles, CA 90024 

thepia2a>rwsetby.com 




Summer 'Discount^ 

Single $950 $1045 
1 BD $1145 - $1395 

2 BO $1645 
? BD w/loft $201 5 



660 Veteran 
208-2251 



summerbruin 



To advertise call: 

Display 
(310)825-2161 

On-Campus 
(310)206-7562 

Classified Line 
(310) 825-2221 




SANTA MONICA STUDIO $875 wak to 
man«et/bub street parking awaiiat>le 9^5 
Garage $i50mK>nth anjamo now. 1234 
14th Street 310-471 7073 

SANTA MONICA townhouse 2bdrms 2 1/2 
baths w/d hookups $1294 310 395-RENT 
www westsiderentals com 

SANTA MONICA unturmshed studio ibalh 
retngeraioi. slove dtstHnastier utilities m 
.ludeo $575 310 395-RENT wwwwestsid 
erenials com 

SANTA MONICA NORTH Of WILSMME 

Nice itxJrm upp«-' Slove Iridqi cafpat 
Great location Nea' Ocean Sunny No 
pets $ll50/mc 323 462-0507 

SPACIOUS AIRV STUDIO Full Kitchen. 
Corner ot Strathmore 'Veteran Clos«? to 
Campus Express Rent $950'mo Water plus 
gated part<in(j included ApW20e Call ?10 
208-2251 ASAP 

VENICE t>each apartment it)drm ocean 
view utilities included July S895 310-395 
^368 www westsidt^rentals com 

WALK TO UCLA 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE Spacious 3 Bed 
loom.;' Batti Maa 3 people $1900 Gated 
Parking 927 Hilgard 310 208-3945 

WALK TO UCLA WESTWOOD 
itxirm/ibth 2txJrm/2bm Pool lacu/zi walk 
ir^ closets fireplace luH-kitchen gated ga 
rage instant broadt>arx> avail www kelton 
towers com 310-208 1976 

WEST LOS ANGELES close to UCLA bach 
elor bright utililieb included $390 3 10 395 
RENT www westsiderentals com 



WESTWOOD 

Bachelor One Bortroom Spacious with 
Balcony Near campus 310-444 1478 



J 



I 



WrsrwfKKl \'ill«iv*< 

-* V{ Kt'lion \\« 
i.{|<>) J(l^^-^M)H'". 

1 Bedroom trom $1225 

2 Bedroom from $1700 

xUa targe luxury ur)its incluOt 

• "^ully equipped kttcften 

• Central heating and air 

• Extra closet space 

• Wettjar in selected units 

• Private Dalcony 

• 2 Bdroms have 2 baths 

• Intercom entry t gaisd iMrtong 

'vlrtl^ t yaarlHM 

oramuiMiav maiiart »» 

lull '.'(.iti'il l't(ipi-n\ S«T\'icc^ Ini 



^ 



Displa] 
206 30f 



.^J^*-"' ■*"•* 



'24 \tiimlj\. liiK 2 'M>\ 



KARON 

From page 2t 

S.inla C ru/ heller ihan .1 \iMl U> 
l.>htin\ ^ 

Vl.i\bc II .ill iiisi \Aa>n t incani in 
iH I, 'hum > I irsl opened di>wn- 
iiuMi II) I'''^^ bul had .1 second >lore 
a>.ru>s town tail in l^'-tti. like (ceil 
I kUIci trvinj; lo ^lcal a base Whal 
l>ili!ir.i ^ never tailed to do ho\*es- 
i.-i \i,i^ put >niile> on \l> patrons' 
!ai.i. - 1 1 \vas the l>pe ■>! place thai 
i.uii;lii voungsterN that -it wasn t 
^vhcthei .oil vvore the \m Jordan > 
• •: thv Ho Jackson (rossirainers 



thdi Mas important, but how you 
played (he game 

Perhaps this is indicative or a 
trend in sports towards de-persi>n- 
uiization In the late l9K()s (also 
known as Johnny s glory years), 
sports seemed much more inierac 
live The Oakland As had a special 
da\ when everv kid in attendance 
got lo run the bases belore the 
game, not with their parents bul 
with metnbers of the team .\thleles 
did not chaige money lor ault>- 
graphs and homet(»wn heroes 
donated tunds to the UH:a! high 
schools and Little L cague pro- 
grams 



^CT MKIft tiANDS ON A 
lINiVE^I^ Ci^OKT \INiON 

STMOCHTUIAfl 

When H s time to choose, 
select University Credit UmoN 

• federol Stafford ond PIUS Loom 

• Lender Code 832123 

Ht offer more Hmh 
JHSt a StM^eiit Look 

• On CompiK Info tenter in 
A(kernwn limon A Level ^ 

• FREE ChKkmg ^ 

• Seven ATMs on ifie UCLA Campus 

• ConHMler Purchose Logns 

• Cor Loons 

Phone (310)477 6628 
Wefa iMMv.utu.org 




8UOO 

Annrtrrtents tor Rrn' 



ET 



GAYLEY MANOR 
APTS 

Larf>e. Clean 
Singles A I BedriHtms 

Across the Street from UCLA 

Watk to Village 

Near Le Conte 

No Pets 

729 Gaytey Ave. 

(310)208-8798 



WESTWOOD Dacneloi cat oK watx to 
UCLA $525 310-395RENT »»¥»w westsid 
•rentals com 

WESTWOOD 

Cfi-ifTiinq iDdrm $1400 includes all utilities 
Hardwood floors 959 Gav'ey Ave •b 'bdrm 
$ •. 30r -)r Midval* 310-206 7123 

WESTWOOD CONDO 

N»-*'v Hnic.Oelea t Dedroorr, ■, t,dir, unit 
martMe and wood finishes Full kitchen and 
lospts Overlooking garden pool and lacu/ 
z. Private parkinq and 24 hour security Op 
positp W Hole' A\ 969 Hilgarfl Ave at Wev- 
Dum Quick walk tn UCLA 310 729-2433 



• PALMS * 



^4B0 3a« . Lorr townmomc fp 

^lyTRAt. Am/HEAT GATED GARAGE 

SEC ALARM CAT Cm 
3670 MKWALE AVE S240S/1MO 



?BD 2BA TOWNHOME fP. CENTItAL 

AIR/HEAT GATED GARAGE 

SEC ALARM CAT 0¥. 

3614FA»MSOR S138S/MO 



♦ MAR VISTA • 



8UOO 

Apartmenls for Rent 



BEVERLY HILLS lumished. pnvale roofn 
w/d hoohuos tv/vct $575 310-395-RENT 
iwww westSKMrentats ccwn 

BRENTWOOD 

NORTM OF WILSHIRE spacious 
3bdmV2t)th upper w/ balcony New d»h 
washer relngeralor stove, etc Quiet B-unit 
t>«dg w/ garden survteck (2295 11921 
Goshen Ave M Open Sunday or by appt 
310-571 -0293 



AESTWOOD PLAZA 

GREAT SUMMER 
DISCOUNT 



toclielors 

Singles $750-Sl 200 

1 Bedroom .. $1 000- Si 200 



31 0-208-8505 



1 1 74e comrTLEiGtf oo 

t273tCASWEU./IM 
12630MTCHEU IMi 
12741 MnCMBi. UK 

Od«^ MOo^* Mr ' 



S129S/MO 
$1345/MO 
$1345/MO 
S1346/MO 



J p*f 



ptO) 301-1070 



WESTWOOD VILLAGE Untumtshed ibe<J 
roofn, $1400 10990 Strathmore Furnished 
Ibdrm $1350 547 Landtair 1 year lease 
No pels Available Sept 310-471 7073 

WESTWOOD Bachelor $795 utilities paid 
rx) partiing i-badroom $1400 3-car parti 
ing 10943 RoaMng lyear lease no pets 
available July 3 1 0-47 1 7073 

WESTWOOD SPACIOUS ONE BED«OOW 
Sii25up Dmning area stove retndgerator 
2 Bedroom duplex $2000 Parking. Laundry 
Walk UCLA 11096 Strathmore 310-454 

8211 



8600 

Cfinflo'Townhniisr t >• Rt n* 



PALMS 

2bdrm/'2bth upper Availat>le July <?nd Baico 
ny appitances security buMing and parking 
t12 Blue Bus to UCLA $n90 email luKjm- 
«• yahoo com 

WALK TO UCLA 

Luxurious High-nae cond(> on Wilshire & 
SheOy ibd/i 75 balh Spectacular view 
lOlh floor $1790 AwwMMe 0^2 018-991 
8234 



Classifieds 
825-2221 



Oaih Brum Sports 



Times have detinilel) changed 
Vfc hen ni> high schmil sought to 
huild a ncM baseball field two years 
ago. a Lcrtain local prolessiunal 
baseball player declined to con- 
tribute tunds Despite his mulli-mil 
lion dollar contract, he seemed 
nuinb lo the needs ol the communi- 
ty 

The nevycr. larger sporting goods 
shops are not numb to the commu- 
nity in general Because they curry 
>o much equipment, everyone s 
needs arc usually met But what 
about the Ictt-handcd catcher whti 
needs help with his chest protector. 
or the Id-year-old pitcher who 



needs his glove relaced in 15 min- 
utes so he can make his game on 
time* You cannot tell me that the 
•NSYN( wannabe working al Big 
5. making money to tundiiis hair- 
dye collection, w ill be able to help 
these young athletes 

That was the lure ot Johnny's 
and all other down-home sports 
shops They truly care, even at the 
expense of their profits These 
shops, like player-managers and 
football players who play every 
down are dying institutions 

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One likes lo return home from col- 
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might ease the constriction the 
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Then, even if your Johnny s 
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Pat 10 pl«yen selected in 2001 N8A Dnft 
-first I 



13 Riduird Jeftmon, Arizona (Nnv imey) 
IB iason ColHnwiMllKll (Mew Jeney) 




31 Gilbert Arenas/Xnzona (Golden State) 

35 Brian Scalabrme, liSC (New Jeney) 

36 Jeff Trepagnier, US( (Oeveiand) 

39 Michael VVnqht, Aruona (New Voii) 

4t EMt WMSMI, OCU (SMittt) 

45 Sean Lampley, Cal (Chicaqo)^ 

46 Lofen Woods, Anzona (Mi|| 
S3 Jarron Collins, Stanfoid I 
56 Bryan Bracey, Oregon (San Aii 




S(AN WATf IK/lXMly Brum SffiKM Su 

DRAFT-, .:/;.;.:,;.■./;.., 

From page M 

I tried lo emulate him all throughout 
college." Watson said He kimws 
htm to lock down player> I'm going 
lo lace him ever> day in priicticc. and 
he's going to help me grou and help 
everv aspect ol m> game " 

Seattle was one ot the 10 clubs 
Watson vyorked out lor He flevk out 
on graduation dav alter receiving his 
degree in history 

"This IS like the beginning." he 
said "Its like writing a masterpiece 
It doesn't matter so much hov^ it 
starts, you mt>stly get encited lor the 
conclusion 

"I had an idea they were very inter- 
ested." Watson continued 
"Everybody talks about getting dratt- 
ed by the right team, one that fits you 
This IS that team lor me" 

Watson also expressed his surprise 
m jonterence players not .selected in 
the Tirsl round of this year s NBA 
dralt 

Arizona took the biggest hit on 
Wednesday with lour early ent; , lt>ss- 
es Wing-lorward Richard JefTcrson 
was the I .^th and fmai lottery pick by 
New Jersey Shooting guard (iilbert 
Arenas went early in the second 
round at No .^1 lo CJolden State 
Power forward Michael Wright went 
to New York at No 3V just prior lo 
Wats«in s name being called 

But the deepest and most shtKking 
slide of the evening was center Loren 
Woods falling to Minnesota with the 
46th pick of the 5K-player draft 
Slated up to draft day as a first-round 
and possible lottery pick. Woods has 
been tabbed as a soft player through- 
out his four-year stint at Wake Forest 
and Arizona 

Stanford's Jason Collins was the 
only other first-round conference 
pKk at No. 18. joining Jefferson with 
the Nets. 

Southland prep standout Tyson 
Gtandler initially went No 2 overall 
to the hometown LA Qippen, 
before being traded later on Draft 
Nifht with Bnan Skwner to Qucafo 
for Elton Brand. 

"When the Qippers choae me. I 
pretty much thought I'd be there," 
Chandler said upon hearing the 
developments "When I heard the 
Gippers picked me at two, I was 
excited But now that I'm with the 
Bulls. I'm even more excited " 

Other local college products cho- 
sen were Pepperdtnc guard Brandon 
Armstrong at No 23 and USC for- 
ward Brian Scalabrme at No 35 to 
New Jersey Trojan guard Jeff 
Trepagnier followed Scalabrme at 
No. 36 to Cleveland 

Watson reported to Seattle last 
Thursday after watching the draft at 
home in Kansas City Head coach 
Nate McMillan's starting backcourt 
IS somewhat in disarray at the 
moment, with Payloa peaaiMy cm his 
way out via a traiie aad frae nfent 
Shammond Williams heanng ofTers; 
Seattle only lists veteran David 
Wingate. Brent Barry and Emanuel 
Davis as ptards for next season. 




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26 Monday. July 2. 2001 



Daily Brum Sparto 



Frompage 2S 

die m a cloud of leathers and bones 
like the poor bird he retentl> hil. 
bill no\* I know h»)\\ Brooklyniles 
nuisi have suMcrcd v^hen the 
DodgLTN skipped lown. how 
^.inkcc tans leii when I ou (jehri^- 
tuins.' cm up. and how all those 
\1 I lools reacted when Mr 
VKVt.ihon annoiiiKed the league 
\^.l^ liilding like a p.iper crane 

'Sou have all been li> Johnn> n 
v^IkiIk-i sou kiuns il <n not 
C tiaiKL- are. \oit bouehi \our lirst 



btfiieball or softbal! cleats at a store 
very similar to the one with the 
inviting yellow sign and perpetually 
open glass doors Men and women 
in these stores pr(»bably showed 
vou how to string a tennis racket, 
pick out the perlect bat. or tie your 
soccer shoes |ust right, so that the 
laces did not ruin your kicks 

For many kids a visit to 
.lohnn> s was better than a trip to 
Disneyland, at least lor those ot us 
scared ol roller coasters The store 
has old hardw<»od tloors that help 
(hose walking with metal cleats gam 
ir.iction. st>meihing \ou seldom see 
in the careless commercial world ot 



slippery white tiles Th^walls are 
adorned with posters that send any 
child of the '80s into fits of noaui)- 
gic convulsions The 198V Bay 
Bridge World Series. Darryl 
"Chocolate Thunder" Dawkins and 
ol course, the memorable Bo 
Jackson poster with the shoulder 
pads and baseball bat. arc among 
them Residing between the posters 
is a gigantic moose head which ma> 
have had no connection to sporting 
goods but still looked pretty cot)l 
with an Oakland As hat perched 
on Its horn-draped dome 

Johnn> s Sports death was not 
unexpected I knew it was sick 



ilbout five years ago when I had to 
drive across town to the Big 5 to 
find the right size baseball pants 
Things just got loo specialized, and 
athletes seeking an edge turned to 
mass production and limitless 
options Johnny s may have earned 
Reebok Pump basketball shi>es 
longer than any other shop, hut 
they were the last to get the new 
Kobe Bryants While murderous 
chain stores featured those ugly 
new orange and blue Denver 
Broncos Jersey s. Johnny's was 
keeping it real with orange and yel- 
low striped Houston .Astros shirts 
and original Milwaukee Brewers 



hats. 

Although there was not another 
place in town where one could find 
more minor league baseball caps. 
there were clearly not enough peo- 
ple in town to buy them. 

I admit I feel somewhat at fault 
for the downtafl of Johnny s 
Sports. On occasion I have been 
caught in the cathedral known as 
Sportsmart Just last year I wel- 
comed the new C'opeland's to 
Ackerman llnion with open arms 
land an open wallet) But through it 
all. nothing made coming home to 



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Daily Brum Sports 



Moiulds. Juh 2. 2001 27 



BASKETBALL 



On hridiiN. it was announced thai 
Michael Fey. a cenier Irom C apital High 
SchiH)l in OKmpia. Wash . will inH be 
attending I (LA m the tail 

Frys leticr ol Inieni which he signed 
last November, will be vinded bs UCLA 
because he did not meet N{ AA initial 
eligibility requirements 

he>. who stands at 6 leel 1 1 inches and 
weighs 245 ptiunds. s^as expected to 
serve a^ senior center Dan Ciad/uric s 
backup lor the men s basketball team 
Sophomore lorward U ( ummings is 
now expected lo become the backup cen- 

tCf- 

l iCL A^s r ecnifting chcs that was sup- 
posed to include Ke> m>w consists ol 
Cedric Bo/.eman. Andre Patterson and 
Dijon Tht»mps«in Before the setback. 
DCXA had compiled the No 2 recruit- 
ing class in the nation according to 
Recruiting L'SA 

But the Bruins are still expected to he 
iMie ol the tt»p teams in the nation next 
season, largely due lo the lact (jadzuric 
and junior swingman Jason kapono 
decided to c«ime back lo DCLA instead 
lYl' leaving lor the NBA 

Lnable \o get the required scores on 
his ACT exams. Ke> now plans to attend 
a junior college or a prep schiH>l instead 

During his senior year in high schtH)l. 
Fey averaged 20 points. 10 rebounds and 
LS blocks a gwnc. 

Com p it e d froni Daily Bruin wnrr serviCM. 



Overcrowtfing the mantel 



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The Sears Trophy is still the most renowned of all the NCAA Championship trophies won by UCLA sports teams. View 
additional exclusive photos from inside the r>ew Hall of Fame at the Morgan Center by logging onto www.dailybruin.ucla.edu. 



BEUING if 

MunicipHl RA^OViP ^ V OI^TCSS pUSSCQ tt 
bill to suppon Beijing and bid tor the 
2008 OlympK Games at its annual ses- 
sion in February this year The bill 
noted that bringing the Olympics to 
Beijing will have prolound influenLT 
on the development ol the Olympic 
Movement and the Olympic Ideal 
Additionallv. an IOC poll showed % 
perc-eni suppi>rt lor the Olympics in 
Beijing and other urban areas 

"China needs the world and the 
world needs China." Liu said during 
the presentation "Ciivc Beijing a 
chance and it will reward the world 
with a miracle " 

Bui China s human rights record 
could again be a maj<)r issue, as pr(v 
Tibet groups have already threatened 
, to waflc a campaign against Beijing's 
bid. Also, considerable population 
growth in a city of alreadv more than 
12 million could provide obstacles lo 
Beijing's run lor the bid But most, 
including Richard D Schult/. former 
executive director ol the Linited Stales 
OlympK- Committee, leel that what 
Beijing has to ofler outweighs an\ 
potential problems 

"Having been invi>lved in inierna- 
tional politics lor a giH»d number of 
years. I think that Beijing almost has to 
have a disa.ster between m>v» and JuK 
\^ to keep them Irom getting the bid." 
Schull/ siiid in a phone interview "I 
think the international communit> 
really wants to see the games there 
The> think it will realK open up Chioti 
and be an advantage worldw ide 

"11 nothing dramatic changes, it 
may impact the vote in the L S dele- 
gation, but I don t think it will have an 
impHCi on anybody else " 

Li. who retired alter Beijing lost the 
bid for the 2(MK) Olympics in IW\ 
feels thai China oflers a vast untapped 
market for the Olympics. additionalK 
however, he hopes that Beijing will be 
chosen as the host citv of the 200K 
Olympics for the sake t>f both the cinin- 
try and its athletes 

"If Beijing wins- iIk bid. more ath- 
letes will have the opportunilN \o com- 
pete." Li said Since (Beijing s) 
putting so much cfVort into winning 
dK bid and the g«>vernment has built «> 
HMny new sport facilities lor general 
citizens, sports participation will 
undouNedK mcTeasc It would be a 
very gixid thing for China and the 
intematKHtal community " 



GRADUATION 

From page 28 

number recommended by the 
Knight ( ommission report might 
not be a realistic goal, even by the 
year 2007 

"I don't think you can arbitrarih 



set a number at 50 percent." 
Montgomery said "There arc stu- 
dents who don't graduate even if 
they have the best intentions, so I 
don't know if athletes should be held 
to a higher standard than the average 
student " 

MonlgomerN also said that if you 
held (ilhletes to the same criteria as 



the other entering freshmen, as 
Stanford does, then schools like 
UCLA would no longer have the 
same caliber of teams 

There are three Pac-IO schools 
where the graduation rale o\ the stu- 
dent athletes is 10 percent lower than 
that of the combined student bod\ - 
UCLA, use and Cal 



Cal ranks as the worst Pac-IO 
school in the dilTerential. as its stu- 
dent body's graduation rate is Ml per- 
cent, while the student-athletes' is 59 
percent, a 22 percent gap UCLA is 
second, with a 7K percent graduation 
rate for all of the students while the 
student-athletes come in at 5*> per- 
cent, a 1'^ percent drop 



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\jeatiuf (•urn 
never gets j 
breiik Hcjd hini 
Wednesdavs at 



www.ddilvbruin.ucla fdu 




Daily Bruin 



orts 




>rt* Ihf lllsl phdlo 



from I'ClAs renovated Hall 
of Fame in the Morgan 
Center. It's a Daily Bruin 
exclusive See page 27. 



Mondav. Julv 2. 20<)l 



Commission reveals low graduation rates 



RAC-IO: Proposal would 
limit sch(M)ls" postseason 
pla> ; athletics ma\ suffer 



Bv Vytas Maiciu 

Daily Brum Senior Stdff 

B\ rtK)". Pat- Ht learns whi) gradu- 
ate ifsN than ^11 ptTccnt ol their pl.i>- 
ofs nui\ he ineligihle tor p«)stscason 
pi.i\ il reeommend.iiion h\ the 
knight hourxjiituni ( >>iiiniisMon on 
Intercollegiate -\ih(eiii.> > .locepied 
h\ the NCAA 

Xctording to the niosi reeent 
\( AN graduation rates report 
rele.ised in 2(MMi onl\ three Pat- Ml 
schoi)ls ( I CI \. I S( and Stanlord i 
uoiild ^ualit\ tor pi>siseason pla> in 
h. >ili men s haskethal! and roothall 
iiiKlei ihe guideline- ol the knight 
( M;Hii>-!on N '^<i peitenl retom- 

IlK'lid.lIlOll 



"I don't think you can 

arbitrarily set a (quota) 

at 50 percent." 

Mike Montgomery 

Stanford head coach 



VK.i-hingion St.itc I niversit\ 
vMnilii he the onK other Pat- 10 school 
\o qii.ililv in men - haskethall. while 
Arizona State I nnersitv. Oregon 
State I nnersitv and I ( Bcrkele\ 
would he ineligible tor both sports 

( iting dropping graduation rales 
III lootb.ill and men - basketball as its 
primar\ eontern. the report eomcs at 
a time when neither I niversitv ol 



GMfXMTION RATES FOR THE PAC-10 | 


At a number of Pac- 10 univmities, graduation rates of footl»ll and men's 
players fell below tt>e schoois overall rates. 

Graduation Rates 


.* 




All 
students 


Student 
attiletes 


FootbaN 


«ton*t 

BaskettMrii 


UCLA 


78 


59 


63 


GO 


use 


69 


57 


59^ 


>^ 


Cal 


81 


59 


</ 


^7 


Stanford 


92 


89 


83^ 


100 


Arizona 


52 


58 


64 


I?:;--" 


Arizona St. 




^ 


40 


IB 


Oregon / 




;io 


58 


31 ^ 


Oregon St. ^ 


-^^ 


56 


53 


21 


Washington 


70 


63 


56 


40 


Washington St 


. 61 


57 


48 


56 


•InfomHtion compiled in 2000 


•OmKf "KM 








1 



Oklahoma nor Florida Slate 
I nivcrsit> would have qualifisd tor 
the football Division I title game 
attordmg to ( rccd Black, the former 
president of the Knight Foundation 

Nobt>d\ should be admitted to a 
sthiK)! unless they have a reasonable 
chante to carr\ the load atademical- 
K. Black s;iid "Often athletes are 
admitted with CiPAs and SAT .scores 



TIMOTHY NGO/CMylrum Snuw Sm<4 

that give no suggestion they can make 
the grades nccessitry to graduate with 
a degree 

Former I nited States Olympics 
Executive Director and current mem- 
ber of the Knight Commission 
Richard Schultz said that the gradua- 
tion rales may be deceiving, especial- 
ly in ba.sketball where a growmg num- 
ber of players are leaving early for the 



N BA. thus contributing to tlie drop m 
graduation rales 

"PersonalK. I feel that million dol- 
lar olTers have to be taken mio con- 
sideration." Schull/ said "The fact 
that I would include there is that if 
athletes leave for professional spt>rts 
and leave in good (academic) stand- 
ing, that should not be held against 
the university graduation rales " 

The L niversity of Arizona i« a 
prime example of this trend After 
U>sing in the 2(M>1 men s haskethall 
title game, all five starters decided to 
give the pro raitks a shot, including 
four underclassmen Sophomore 
guard Jason Cjardner however, with- 
drew his name from the NBA draft 

According to the N( A.A. the 

* University of Arizona has an average 

graduation rate of 17 percent for the 

freshman classes of IW()-IW.^ - the 

lowest in the Pat- 10 

Arizona Stale L niversity is second 
U>west at 18 percent with the 
Inivcrsity of Oregon next at 21 per- 
cent Vi' Berkeley is next with 27 per- 
cent 

Stanford Iniversity managed to 
graduate 100 percent of its four class 
average, while I CTA graduated M) 
percent 

And Duke Unn^erstty. Arizona's 
opponent in the 2001 mens basket- 
ball titic game, graduated 75 percent 
of Its players 

"A schiHil like Duke or Stanf«>rd 
has ditTerent institutional goals from 
a commuter school." NC AA 
Director of Public Relations Wally 
Renfro said "None ol that is siiying 
that an institution is not doing a gotid 
job educating, ihey have different 
missions " 

Stanford I niversity men s basket- 
ball head coach Mike Montgomery, 
though, points out that the 50 percent 



Generations 
foul out with 
death of smal 
sports shops 

OOLUMN: Mom 'n' pop 
stores give customers 
personalized attention 

Johnny's Sports Shop is 
dead Nestled on the comer 
ot Pacific and C athcart in 
downtown Santa Cru/, Calif.. 
Johnny's epitomized America's 
mom n' pop sports shops, but it 
IS going out 
of business 
after 4S 
years of ser- 
vice to the 
community, 
it person- 
ifies the 
plight of 
mom n 
pop spt>n- 
tng goods 
stores 

across the ^^— ^— — -— 
nation, and 

even in a small town like Santa 
Cruz. Johnny s was strangled to 
death by chains like Big 5 The 
aroma inside Johnny s is one of 
Rawlings leather and stale 
mothballs. Ciatorade gum and 
Nike afhietic shoes It is half 
mus«um and half spt^rls shop ' 

News of Johnny s going out 
of business struck me like a 
Randy Johnson fastball to the 
skull OK. so I probably won't 




On-campus seminar furthers 
China's 2008 Olympic hopes 



With 40th pick. 




drafts Watson 



BEUING: Proponents sa\ 
bid v^ill benefit athletes, 
facilities alread\ ("reded 



ByMkMteC 
Daily Brum Reporter 

On July 1^ m M«nt<iw Russia, the 
the International OKmpit ( ommittee 
w ill decide which cit\ w ill host the 200h 
Summer Olympiad Bei|inp. China is 
wideK considered the city \o beat, but 
there is tough competition from 
loronto ( anada and Pans, France 

After losing its 2tKK» Olympic bid b\ 
two votes to Sydnev. Australia. V iclor 
Liu vice president of the Chinese 
Students and Scholars Association at 
I ( I \ hopes not lo relive the disiip- 
pomtmeni he experienced in ( hina 
eight years ago 

Last Wednesday a seminar htwted 
hv Ihe CSSA was held in Ackerman 
I nion t(> intri>duce and promote 
Belling N ( Hympic bid to I (LA 

I (Kusing specificallv on spttrts lacil- 
itics political issues transp<irtati<'n 
and environmental protection Liu ancT 
others laid out a comprehensive pre- 
sentation supp«>riing Belling s Nd in 
hopes of serving as .1 bridge between 
I (LA and Beiimg 

We want t(< get more involved with 



the athletic department here at 
I (LA Liu said In every world- 
wide athletic event, there have been 
many representatives from LiCLA 
This universrty provides a ginxl oppor- 
tunity to share inlormation with those 
athletes and coaches "" 

China hopes to provide ^"^ new 
venues lor the 2(K>f( Olympics, with ^2 
ol the venues lix:aled in Beijing itself 
Sixteen of the '" venues have already 
been erected and 15 are under con- 
struction If Bei)ing receives Ihe bid on 
July I \ the SIX remaining venues will be 
creeled Additionally, three mam air- 
ports already exist and approximately 
400 new bus routes will be added to the 
city 

Just from Its facilities. Beijing is 
g(H>d enough to host any lop sporting 
event, said guest Tony Li record- 
holder lor the 1 10 meter hurdles in Asia 
and former N( AA Track and Field 
Champion from Washington St 
I niversity "It s been preparing for the 
experience It hosted the llth Asian 
(larries m I WO and in August, it will 
host the Small Olympics. s<> I really 
think It s very well prepared " 

Strong support from national and 
local levels ol giwcrnment has account- 
ed for praise from international offi- 
cials and the KK The Beijing 



■pr^ vt j( \.%.JJi 


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V\VVV# 


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' ;C J 


l)w 


2 


4 




H 


' * 1 


\ 



Former Bniin captain, 
iron Man hopes to learn with 
Gar> Payton's guidance, si^ill 



fom>er UCLA captain EaH VNMmn mar^euwrs t)etwtgn several 
Cowfars for a reverse laj^jp agair^ Washington St last season. 



ByAJ( 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

The luster of UCLA's iron Man will 
have a chance lo shine brightly in the 
Emerald City 

Recent graduate Earl Watson was select- 
ed Wednesday as the 40th pick of the 2001 
N BA Draft by the Seattle Supersonics. He 
was the seventh of nine point guards select- 
ed in the draft, and al.so the seventh Pac- 10 
confereftce player cht>sen of 1 1 

"It's a big relief." Watson said on Draft 
Night "You know the players, you know 
the team, and you know where you're 
going lo be livingjlie next few years " 

Watson furthers UCLA's streak to five 
consecutive years of a Brum chosen in the 
two-round drafl-ihe longest since 1985. 

'You really can't place any value on 
where you get drafted I've always been in a 
situation to prove myself and I'm very con- 
fident in my abilities " 

Watson, who started all 129 games m his 
illustrious UCLA career, is optimistic 
about Ihe opportunity lo abaorb additional 
knowledge of the game from current Sonic 
point guard Ciary Payton. who is rumored 
to be on his way out of Seattle. 

"I have a kN of respect for Gary Payton 



Sm 



25 



iJCLA 



DAILY BRUIN 



SiT\'inj»lh«- UC|..A<'<»mmuriily sinM" 1J»1!> 

QuarU»rlife crist's 

Thr (ia.sh lor cush is slr»'*isin|i <»ul 
tw«'nly-H<>m«Mhings. 
VIEWPOI!WT. PAGE If 



Monday, JiLV 9. 2(H)1 



vi-\^'w.(latlvl»riiiti ticla.i'<lii 



Vlolen<*<» (*()n(inu(\s in MidrasI 

I'ah'siinian.s vow r«'ven^«' lor lh«* > 
(Jralholan ll-y«'ar-4>UnM>y. 
NEWS. PAGE 5 



Fantasy Sports (iuru 

i\v\ vvm\\ lor Wr(lri«*stla> srcMuiiin 
on lh<' National L<*a>iii«'"Non-Siars.' 
SPORTS. ONLINE 




• f 



drafts may hurt UC schools 



FUNDS: Enerpv crisis has 
depleted stale cofTers, will 
affect educational system 



By 

Daily Bruin Scniar StflT 

As California enters into the second 
week of the fiscal year without a budget 
and stale lawmakers work out some 
kinks in Sacramento, funding for the 
Universil) of C alilornia hangs in the 
balance 

The current draft of the budget, 
which has not been approved by the 
state assembly or senate, falls short of 
what the K^\(S had requested to help com- 
pensate for the expected influx of 
60.000 students over the next 10 years, 
said UC spokesman Brad Hayward 

As of now. S90 million ~ roughly half 
of the UC"s requested core budget 
increase - has been cut out of the bud- 
get 

Hayward said the UC had also asked 

for the increase in core budget to 
account for inflation and an increase in 
enrollment and hiring, and to help pay 
for employee's salaries and health bene- 



Demonstrators 

gather in front of 

the Federal 

Building in 

IMestwood on 

Sunday to 

remember the 

anniversary of a 

dorm raid in 

Tehran, Iran. 



fits 

Scott Svonkm. spokesman and chief 
of slalT for Assemblyman Paul Korelz. 
D-West HollywtHHi. represents the dis- 
trict which includes UCLA Svonkm 
stated the UC is not the only entity 
receiving less than it asked for. since the 
energy crisis has left the stale strapped 
for mtmey. 

It's doubtful that any of the (V^V) 
initiatives will be fully funded, but that's 
because almost no state programs will 
be lully funded. " he said 

During the May UC Regents meet- 
ing in San Francisco. Larry Hershman. 
Li( vice president for budget, said leg- 
islative support for a "basic partner- 
ship" between the stale government and 
the UC lo take on the expected influx oi 
students was waning 

Additionally. Hayward said the stale 
can't fulfill Its role in this partnership 
entirely because the energy crisis has in 
part limited the funds 

Before the budget can go to the gov- 
ernor. It must pass the assembly and sen- 
ate by a two-thirds margin. 

Under the slate constitution, the 
assembly was supposed to have the bud- 
get approved by June l.*^. aiuf the budget 
was 10 lake elTect July I. the beginning 



of the fiscal year 

This year, education cuts will likely 
■ iKcur not only at the university level, 
but across Ihe boards 

Funds for programs to promote edu- 
cational (»ppt>rt unities for "at-risk' high 
school students, for example, had lo be 
cut down as well, said Assemblywoman 
Virginia !Strt)m-Martin. D-Sanla Rosa, 
who chairs the assembly s education 
committee 

"There are programs near and dear 
t(> our hearts that we had to cut back 
on." Slrom-Marim said during a tele- 
phone press conference 

Slate Education Secretary Betty Yec 
confirmed that the assembly finance 
committee would not have gollen Ihe 
budget to the assembly floor without 
significant cuts in education and other 
Slate-funded programs 

But Svonkm. noting that the Vi^ may 
endure budget cuts, said Korelz and his 
colleagues have Ihe UC's needs in mind, 
even during the energy crisis. 

"(Koretz) recognizes that UCLA is 
the breeding ground for future leaders 
in all industries." Svonkm said 

Svonkm added thai korelz has we- 



HeHoDali! 




»v.w* 1.*i 1*' ■ 



"Fashion Designer " is one of the Salvador Dali pieces 
on display in Ackerman Grand Ballroom. See Page 14. 




Program aids African American students 



DOCTOMTE: Mentors to 
encourage participants to 
pursue advanced degrees 



BAYOfNMSlI 



Protesters remember 
Iranian student's death 



By 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

When Richard Yarborough 
attended Michigan State 
University as an undergraduate stu- 
dent in Ihe early 1970s, he never 
encountered any African American 
professors 

"Given that I had never seen a 
black college professor first hand 
and yet I was considering entering 
thai profession, it was important 
not only lo see one in action, but to 
work with him. and see someone 
who was confronting the challenges 
of being an African American in 
this profession.' .said Yarborough. 
an associate professor of English 



and director o'i the Center for 
African American Studies 

He explained that because 
African American role models in 
academia arc still rare, the CAAS is 
hosting Its first annual Humanities 
and Humanistic Studies Institute lo 
provide support for 16 African 
American students from across the 
nation with prospects of pursuing a 
graduate and doctoral degree 

"What we know is that the num- 
ber of African Americans who earn 
Ph D.s each year is not large." 
Yarborough said "Without 
encouraging students to go on to 
graduate school and lo earn 
Ph D s. that pool of prospective 
faculty members will remain 
small ' 

The program targets students 
from historically black colleges and 
universities but is not restricted to 
African Americans, said Nandmi 
Gunewardena. CAAS associate 



director of research 

The four-week program which 
runs until July 20. consists of men- 
lorship programs, field trips and 
seminars on cultural expression . 
the Rodney King case and 
( aribbcan literature 

"The mam goal is to help further 
understanding of the African 
American experience through the 
humanities lens." Gunewardena 
said "Every department uses a dif- 
ferent method to understand it" 

Students go on field trips to 
places with historical significance, 
iike the California African 
American Museum. Watts Towers 
Art Center and the Grin'ith Park 
and Observatory. 

Additionally, the program pairs 
each student up with a dilTerent fac- 
ulty member. Mentorship. 
Yarborough -said, is a key factor for 
entering a career in the academia 



Reformist 
" government criticized for 
oppressive views, actions 



Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Protesters waved national flags 
at the Federal Building Sunday dur- 
ing a rally to commemorate the sec- 
ond anniversary of a dorm raid in 
Tehran. Iran that left one student 
activtst dead 

When the government banned 
the Tehran University newspaper 
on July 9, 1999. student demonstra- 
tors sympathetic lo the reform 
movement rose up Later thai night. 
Ihe students' dormitory was 



stormed by police as more than 20 
students were seriously injured and 
properly was vandalized 

The Iranian government said Ihe 
raid was not authorized by the 
Interior Ministry, which has author- 
ity over the police force President 
Mohammed Khatami said the inci- 
dent indicated the need for more 
stringent control over the police, 
but many protesters feel the calling 
has gone unanswered 

We re just protesting against 
the Islamic regime and celebrating 
those who have given their lives for 
this cause.' said Niousha Momi. a 
third-year psychobiology student, 
who sat on a concrete block in 
between a line of protesters with 
signs showing photos of Ihe blood- 



Task force to oversee LGBT national curriculum 



SCHOOLS: Program aims 
to address issues, make 
education^ore inclusive 



By 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

The National Education 
Association crealed a task force last 
week lo look into developing edutit- 
tionai materials on the struggles of 
lesbian, gay. bisexual and transgen- 
der students and stafl after with- 
drawing a resolution which aimed lo 



make education more inclusive to 
LGBT students 

The proposed resolution support- 
ed the development i>f curriculum 
and instructional materials for 
LGBT students and programs that 
would address problems they lace 

But opponents ol the proposed 
resolution charged that it wiuild 
promote homosexuality in schools 

NFA President Boh Chase s.ud 
creation of the task force was not an 
attempt to side-slep LCiBT educa- 
tion is.sues 

"Let me be clear." Chase said in a 
statement on Julv 5 "In no wav is 



the NEA backing away from deal- 
ing with important issues raised by 
the resolution Those who are 
attempting to interpret the creation 
of a task force in this manner could 
not be further from the truth ' 

The NEA. which lists the 
advancement of education for all 
people as one o'i its goals, regularly 
lobbies legislators for school 
resources and files legal aclii>ns lo 
protect academic freedom 

According to the NFA. LGBT 
students have high dropout and sui- 
cide rales and arc often lea.sed and 



Mtrnday Julv ». 20<)l 



Utfiiy Brum News 



String of crises impedes social progress in Algeria 



SOCETY: Many in coun 
try displeased with its 
eiirrenl government 



By 

Thf Associdted Press 

AUilhRS Algeria Imdcr a 
scorching Mcdilcrranean sun more 
ihan 1(H) people stand listlcssl) in line 
along a cl»>gged main street in Algiers 
at rush hour, waiting tor a taxi 

Nearby a dramatic marble staircase 
sweeps dt>wn to handsome gceen gales 
that mark the entrance to the crtv s sub- 
way There, no one stands in line 

Thai IS because the subway doesn I 
gi» anywhere Nearly 19 years after the 
project was launched the subway corv 



sists ol lour still unfinished stations and 
no running trains 

It s another of the many things in 
this North African country that just did 
not gel done, stalled by seemingly 
unending crises 

"By the time they build that subway. 
Ill be dead." said 5 1 -year-old Ah 
Zouichc. one ol those warting for a taxi 

As President Abdelazi? Boulellika 
heads to Washington this week, his 
government is facing the latest crisis 
one ol the worst ever periods of s(Kial 
discontent, amid anger at the wrecked 
economy and ai domination by a mili- 
tary elite 

Two months ago. riots brt>ke out in 
the northeast, the heartland of the eth- 
nic Berber population, where peruxlic 
eruptions of anger against security 
fiwces often lead to bkHxlshed 



This time, however, the discontent 
spread beyond the Berber minority to 
the masses 

C'loK to a million people, fed up 
with soaring unemployment, cramped 
housing and chronic government indit- 
lercnce. staged a march through 
Algiers on June 14. demanding change 
The march turned vK>lent. and lour 
people were killed when a bus over- 
turned Hundreds of protesters repeal- 
ed those demands on July 5 during 
another demonstratK>n in the capital 

"Life here is worse than difTicult 
Us rotten." said Kamel Benali. a 24- 
year-oid medical student "The politi- 
cal system here is completely rotten " 

Blesitcd with 3 1 percent of the 
world's total proven gas reserves, this 
former French colony has become the 
third-largest gas exporter after Russia 




COiVliVlLTNnY _BmEFS 



Rapist sentenced 
to life in prison 

\ man accused of entering homes 
through open windows and sexually 
assaulting eight women was sen- 
tenced to lile in prison on July 6 

Oscar Sala/ar. 22. ol ( uKer City, 
had laced more than two dt)/en 
lelony counts following his 1999 
arrest in the Palms area He pleaded 
cuiltv lo IW(< counts i>l rape and i»ne 
CK)unl 1)1 torceil oral copulation 

\ Superior C\>urt iiidge sen- 
lenced hmi to three life terms and 
ordered hiiu lv> -.ervc .it leasi 2.'> years 
lor each icrni belore he in eligible lor 
pari>lc 

I'i>Ikc milialh arrested Sala/ar on 
suspicion ol burglary in 1999 when 
responding lo calls ol a prowler but 
based on his description, they ques- 
tioned hini about the series ot sexual 
assaults in the Mar Vista and (. uKer 
( it\ areas taking place then 

The first two rapes occurred m 
October 1994 The attacker entered 
the houses through unlocked doors 
.ind windows and assaulted the \ ic- 
linis police said 

UC student found 
guilty of murder 

A I nivcrsity of ( alilornia honor 
student was convicted last week ol 
lour gang-related murders, includ- 
ine the dri\e-b\ shooting ol a lf>- 
\car-old bo\ 

l)a\id Medina a 24-year-old I ( 
San Diejio graduate student, was 
.lisc c,'ii\ icieil i>l live attempted 
MUirders ami laces ,i possible life sen- 

IlMKC 

Medina will lace trial \ug 4 in 
San l)iegi>( ount\ Superior ( ourt 

During the month-long trial, pros- 
ecutors said Medina lived a d(^uble 
life He was a I C SI> graduate who 
worked tor the city ot San Diego and 
a gang member who owned an arse- 
nal ot weapons 

We re pleased the jury made the 
right \erdicl. said Denisc Vedder. a 



spokeswoman for the San Diego 
County District Attorney s office 
"Justice was served in this case, 
especially for the victims " 

Prosecutors said two of Medina s 
victims did not belong to a gang but 
were caught in the crossfire and 
killed 

Medina was convicted of aiding 
and abetting the murder of Paul 
Iruong. 21. in the 1999 shootout and 
of trying to kill Truong s twin broth- 
er. Peter 

He also was found guilty in the 
death ol Hector Martinez. Id. who 
died in a drive-by shooting in 1996 

UC Davis scientists 
seek virtual reality 

\pplying virtual reality to help 
scientists see and handle their data is 
the aim (.i\ the C enter for Image 
Processing and Integrated 
I omputing at the I niversity o\ 
(alilornia. l>avis 

The center has been teaching stu- 
dents how to build and work with 
virtual reality environments in one 
of a handful ol courses of its kind in 
the IS 

Its about making the invisible 
visible." said Bernd Hamann. c(v 
director ol CTPK 

(IPK hopes todevelop technokv 
gy for handling very large amounts 
of data, lo establish visualization 
technology at VC Davis, and to 
enable transfer of new inventions 
from the lab bench into industry. 
Hamann said 

Modern research generates huge 
volumes of data, for example from 
genome sequencing, satellite imag- 
ing measuring traffic patterns or 
simulating very complex problems 
such as climate change Medical 
imaging technologies, such as mag- 
netic resonance imaging and 
positron emission tomography also 
generate huge datascts 

Virtual reality could be used to 
tram d»>ciors and surgeons, to let car 
designers try out styles before build- 
ing a vehicle or lo help air traffic 



controllers work in three dimen- 
sions 

The simplest way to handle this 
data IS to make it visible, so that sci- 
entists can "see" what is happening 
in an experiment Virtual reality 
allows researchers to interact with 
the data while they are liK>king at it. 
making changes and seeing what 
happens 

The CI PIC virtual realtty lab is 
currently equipped with an immer- 
sive workbench, which projects 
three-dimensional images onto a tilt- 
ing table Wearing goggles and spe- 
cial gloves connected to the comput- 
er, resjyirchers can reach "into" the 
workbench, pick up virtual objects 
and mt)ve them around 

The lab plans t»> build a "cave." a 
ri»om fitted with projecti)rs generat- 
ing three-dimensional images on the 
walls, floor and ceiling This will let 
scientists literally walk around 
inside their data 

Through CI PIC and the comput- 
er science department. CC Davis is 
olTering a graduate class in virtual 
reality - one of a handful in the C S 
This past spring. 1 1 students took 
the class, completing basic lectures 
and a 12-wcek project to build a vir- 
tual reality program The class was 
developed by computer science 
Professor Ken Joy and graduate stu- 
dent Kaiko Kuester 

"Pretty much all of the students 
were starting from zero in virtual 
reality." said Kuester 

All of this years students were 
computer science students In future 
years. Joy hopes lo bring in students 
from areas such as biology, design, 
theater and dance to create interdis- 
ciplinary projects 

Student projects this year includ- 
ed a virtual modeling Hw\ that lets a 
designer cut and mold shapes, a 
three-dimensional Web browser, a 
method to display virtual reality 
images on a hand-held computer, 
and a visualization of data from a 
gliding competition 

Reports from Daily Brum staff and 

wire services. 



and Canada and (he No 2 exporter of 
liqueHed natural gas after Indonesia 
lugether with oil. gas now accounb for 
97 percent ol the country's total export 
earnings some S22 billion last year 

But the wealth doesn't trickle down 

Madini Chikhi. 59. ¥/ho works for a 
Slate agency as a security guard super- 
vistK. lives in a four-room apartment in 
Algiers with his wife. 1 1 children and 
daughler-in-law Space is so tight that 
SIX daughters sleep on the llotn their 
r(K)m ts t(X) small for beds 

Young boys in his garbage-littered 
neighborhiKxl sell individual cigarettes 
on the sidewalk people cannot aflord 
a whole pack 

"My monthly salary lasts 15 days, 
then I have nothing." Chikhi said 
"Life IS expensive here, and the gov- 
ernment ofTers no social aaustiUiGe." 



Algerians appear to have little faith 
in their democratically elected presi- 
dent. Bouteflika. who meets President 
Bush on Thursday The media accuse 
him of being out of touch and say he 
spends more time jet-setting around 
the globe than resolving problems at 
home 

Bouteflika is also said to have a 
strained relationship with Algeru's 
powerful military leaders - the king- 
makers in this nation since indepen- 
dence in l%2 ; 

The hardsh ip Tufc t e en compounded 
by a nine-year civil conflicl that erupted 
when legislative elections were can- 
celed to prevent an Islamic party from 
winning More than 100,000 Algerians 
have been slaughtered in the ensuing 
struggle between Islamic radicals 



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Daily Bruin News 



Monday. JuK 9. 2001 




Pt«M<M by CCMJtTMf Y STtVWMT/Daiiy Rruui 



F Jackson from Culver City (left) and Tracy Ann Laky from Johannasburg, South Africa create flags to represent thennselves for 
the Soze Projea The project was nanned after late UCLA Professor George Soze Vilakati. who hoped to advance cross-cultural understanding. 




The Soze Project, an 
international exchange 

program at UCLA, 
enhances artistic talent 



By 

IMty Bnim Senior Staff 

For IVyear-<ild Nompiimelelo 
Mayiyune. singing came naturalK 
Without any formal training, her 
voice brought cndlcs.s praise 

"You sing what is m your soul 
and people listen. They hear what 
I've got to say and what Im feel- 
ing." said the young singer, who 
remembers her third-grade teacher 
calling her "my best singer " 

But Nompumelclo. who resides 
in Johannesburg. South Africa. 
never imagined her talent would 
take her around the world to the 
United States - home to some of 
her favorite artists, such as Brandy 
and Mariah Carey 

Nompumelclo is one of 24 
young artists chosen lo participate 
m the S«izc Project, an all expensev 
paid international arts exchange 
that brings together students from 
Johannesburg and l.os Angeles 

The project will culminate m an 
original theatrical prtxluction cre- 
ated by the budding artists, which 



win perform at the end of July at 
Freud Playhouse and at the Apollo 
Theater in Harlem. New York 



"You sing what is In 

your soul and people 

listen." 

Nompumelelo Mayiyanc 

Soze Project participant 



Equal Opportunity Pnxluctions 
' a non-profit organization and 
UCLA Community Programs 
Office project - fund-raised more 
than S 1 50.000 to host the project in 
collaboration with the Market 
Theater and Wiiwalersrand 
University of Johannesburg 

Last Friday morning, the youths 
enjoyed simpler pleasures, hugging 
each other between practicing 
rrwthtxis of choreography in 



kcrckhoU Cjrand Siiloii Protected 
from brief Ills ol warm summer 
ram. the developing artist.s began 
their dance workshop by sitting in 
a circle and sharing pi>siiivc alTir- 
mations 

"Im beautiful Today is a beau 
tiful day. and I'm gonna do beauti- 
ful things If stimebtxly tries to put 
me down. I'm going to try m\ best 
to gel back up. ' sjiid Amy Wilson. 
13. leading the group m the 
mantra 

Wilson. ii student at 
Sandnngham High School in 
Johannesburg, decided to share 
the ritual with the group after 
learning from her mentor to say the 
mantra to herself in the mirror 
each morning 

Her acting mentor and rtxim- 
mate. Aisha Marshall, a 2001 
UCLA alumna who earned her 
degree m ethnomusicology. adopt- 
ed the practice It builds self- 
esteem and begins the day on a pos- 
itive note, said dance mentor Alicia 



"^ -.-*j^' *^ «^ 1 


D ^-~ V ^ — . ■ 







Artists in a workshop learn new acting techniques and share secrets 
during a cross-cultural development exercise behind Hitch Suites. 




Ml to right) 

and 



create their own dance during a workshop. 



M()ndj\. Juh 9 20()l 



Daity Brum News 



STATE & LOCAL 



Single border district faces debate 



LIMITS: Kcslrictt'd terms 
Cfiiisc poliliciaris lo place 
pressure on redisfrictin^ 



By Stave I 

The Associated Press 

S\( RWUMO 
\^^crllhlvm.ln.luall \arga>sa>NcrcaI- 
mi; .1 Mtiulc KHigrcsMonal district 
alonu ( aliliirni.i s border vsilh 
McM*.!' max bt good ci>\frnmcni 
I S Rep Bi>H I ilnei Na\.> ii n l'ihkI 
p. 'Ii;\^ li>i \arl:a^ 

\Vi.-icoiik- li' rcdiNtriclmi; m tlic era 
.'! i.-im IiiiiiIn 

K^J.i.ivMiii; k'ui>.lati\f and conuics 
Mi'ii.i. JiNlrui-,ilk-i tlK'LCiiMiMisualK 
pib IK-nu>t.i.ii>Mt;ainst RcpubiicanN 
111 iiariivaii hi.iuK ihal can liclcrmiiic 
il OIK' part) d.'minak'^ the I cgi lUirc 
and iIk- -.lak' ^ (.unjircsMonal dclcu.i- 
turn li>r the nc\l dctadc 

I hi- >car lejiislatuc (crm liniilN 
iiia> make rcdislnclini! more like a 
[vihtKal Irec-tor-all as man> o( the lep- 
isiator- who will vole on ihe new div 
iriels look lor wa\N \o eviend then 
poliiieal careers 

( oniiressnien like I ilner could end 
up tiirhtini; stale legislators like 
\ argas and st.ite senat»>rs c»>»ld find 
theniseKcs in battles with ^^scmbl\ 
members regardless ol part\ 

'In the old days, the Senate drew 
the Senate lines the As>embl\ drew 
the Assembh lines and each house 
rubbei -stamped the other said 
S*.-nate V1inorit\ Leader Jim Brulte. 



R-Rancho ( ■ucami>nga 

W ith term limits you have a im o( 
As>embl> nicmbers with a lot t)l inter- 
est in the Senate map " 

Voters approved the limits in IWO 
but this mav be the first time the\ real- 
ly allect redistricting Ten years ago 
many lawmakers were hopelul that 
the cimrts would overturn the restric- 
tions 

The limits allow someone to serve 
no more than six years in the 
AssembK and eight years in the 
Senate DierL' are no limits on con- 
gressional terms 

ITiai means Legislators who want 
uninterrupted careers in politics, par- 
ticiilarl\ members ol the As-sembly. 
can t wail long hetore trying to win a 
new post, even il it means taking on 
an incumbent in the siime party 

"II you can say anything certain 
about term limits ii is that thc\ ha\e 
destroyed or significantly weakened 
the (unwritten rule) thai you don t 
challenge an incumbent ol your own 
parts you wait your turn." said Iim 
MtKlson. director ol the (enter lor 
( alilornia Studies at Sacramento 
Stale I niversity 

Rep Hilda St>lis. then a state sena- 
tor, broke thai rule last year when she 
deleated Rep Matthew Martinez lo 
win the [Xrmocratic nomination in a 
Los Angeles area congressional dis- 
trict 

There's likely lo he more intra- 
pariy inlerhouse clashes in the years 
ahead It s going to happen and it s 
going to happen more Irequently." 
says .Assemblywoman Virginia 



Strom-Martin. D-Duncan Mills 

ITie groundwork lor thi>se eleclnm 
battles could be set later this summer 
as legislators struggle lo draw new dis- 
tricts by Sept 14. their scheduled 
adjournment date 

Twenty-eight legislators 21 in the 
Assembly - arc lacing term limits next 
year, and many of them want to run 
for the other house ol the LegisUiture 
or lorC ongress 

Others, like Vargas, can stay where 
thc> are lor a lew more years but may 
be making plans to run lor aiunher 
postin2(K)2.2(K)4or2(MK) 

rhat creates pressures on legisla- 
tive leaders to shiti district lines and 
perhaps the numbers of Senate dis- 
tricts to give their followers a place 
tt) run 

Senators serve staggered rj)ur-ycar 
terms (>nlv even-numbered districts 
will be on the ballot in 20()2 Changing 
a district number from inld U> even 
might allow a termed-out AssemMy 
member win a Senate seat next year 

Supporters of a single congression- 
al district on the Mexican border say it 
would combine communities of inter- 
est, give bt»rder problems more atten- 
tion and give a bigger voice to 
DemiKratic voters in Imperial 
( ounty who arc usually overshad- 
owed in RepublicanHlommated div 
tricts 

But a single border district cover- 
ing Imperial and southern San Diego 
ci>uniies also would be heavily Liitino 

Latinos make up 72 percent of 



Attorney found dead in 
car from apparent suicide 



DEATH: Levin had been 
sutTerinp constant pain 
from Gaucher's disease 



By 

The Auociited Prett 

C nminal attorney Barry Levin, who 
helped handle trik Menende/s mur- 
der defense and more recently repre- 
sented actor Robert Blake, apparently 
shot himself in the head Saturday at the 
Lt)s Angeles Natuwal ( emetery. 

Levin. >4. appeared lo have C(MT>- 
mitted suicide s^iid FBI spokesman 
Matthew McLaughlin Levin suflcred 
from Ciaucher s disease, said Ron 
IXirtman. a fellow attorney who .spoke 
at a news conference al the cx'metcry 

(iaucher's disease is an inherited 
cnzyme-deficiency distuder whose vic- 
tims bleed and bruise easily Levin was 
in constant, severe pain and had 
already had a shoulder replaced 
because of the disease. Dorlman said 

"True lo his character. Barry did not 
want lo burden his friends and col- 
leagues with his sulTering. and they 
were not aware of his deteriorating 
physical condition," D<irfman said "I 
was certainly devastated, but not sur- 
prised The discomlort he was in was 
extreme '" 

Levin was found slumped over the 
steering wheel of his vehicle at about 2 
p.m.. McLaughlin said The FBI was 




Criminal anorr>ey tarry Levin 
was found dead Saturday. 

investigating because the death 
iKcurred at the Los Angeles National 
(emetery. which is federal property 

KKWB-AM said Levin talked to 
some people at the cemetery Saturday 
before going olV alone and shixHing 
himself 

Levin, a former city ptJicc olTiccr, 
was one of the besl-known attorneys m 
Los Angeles Levin was c(><:ounsel for 
Menende/. who was sentenced lo life 
without parole in 19% with brother 
Lyie for killing their parents. 

Attorney Leslie Abramson. who 
was Levin s co-counsel on the 
Menendez case, descrihed Levin as "aH 
heart for his clients " 



Daily Brum News 



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WORLD & NATION 



National Action Psarty expects win in Baja 



VOTING: Lack of viable 
alternative leaves voters 
little sway in the election 

THr Associated Pivss 

MEXK ALL Mexia» Presideni 
Vicenle Fox s party, which has heen 
snatching up victonrs in guhernalunai 
races acros-s Mexico since his historic 
election a year ago. appears headed tor 
another win Sunday in Baja 
California 

Many in the Pacific coast stale that 
borders California will vote for Fox's 
National Action Party, or PAN. not so 
much for its accomplishments, hut 
bet"dU8e they see no hetter alternative 

"For the p<x)r people. theyi;e all the 



same, so IH jttst vole for the PAN. 
because I figure, why change'"' siiid 
Jose Mayolo. a 52-ycar-oid father of 
SIX who was closing up his tamale stand 
to go vtMe in the b<irder city of Tijuana 

The National Action Party has held 
the governorship in Baja C aliforniii 
since I'^xy. when the Pacific coast stale 
became the first in mixlern history to 
elect a governor who was not Irom the 
(ormcr ruling Institutional 

Revolutionary Party, known as the 
PRI 

Since then, the National Action 
Party - which ended the PR Is 71 -year 
ht>ld on power with Fox's July 3(KM) 
victory has invested heavily in paving 
roads, installing water and sewer lines 
and buying police equipment and 
patrol cars 

But corruption still exists, albeit A' 
reduced levels, and crime has 



increased The slate is home ti> one oK 
Mexico's mt>st violent drug cartels, the 
Arrellami Felix brothers. 

"Nothing s changed. " sjiid Eustolui 
I>avilos. u W>-year-«>ld mother ol five 
from Tijuana "In 12 years, the only 
thing we've seen is a lot of deaths, rob- 
beries, and crime We re in a bad way. 
so I'm sticking with the PRI " 

Nevertheless, ptills have given wide 
leads for Fox's pri>-business party in 
nearly all the races m Baja C all forma, 
where voters will chtK>se a governor, 
five mayors and more than a do/en 
si. lie lei:islalors. 

.^ statewide win could mean the 
start of 18 years of uninterrupted PAN 
rule in the sun-drenched state where 
govemtKs serve six-yeai terms 

"'rhe last administrations have 

S«ePHnT,pa9e7 



Boyls death spurs outrager fighting continues 



VIOLENCE: Militant fnx>up 
threatens with tK)mbers; 
figure seized from his car 



By 

The Associated Piess 

RAFAH. Gaza Strip Israeli 
troops and Palestinian gunmen bat- 
tled Sundiiy m the southern Gaza 
Strip, while nearby, hundreds of 
Palestinians vowed revenge at the 
funeral of an 1 1 -ycarnild boy shoi 
and killed a day earlier 

Palestinian militants threw more 
than 60 grenades and fired automat- 
ic weapons at Israeli outposts in 
Rafah. in the Gaza Strip near the 
border with Egypt, the Israeli army 
said The Israeli troops returned lire 
in the overnight clashes 

Also in Rafah. the Palestinians 
buried Khalil Ibrahim al-Mugrabi. 
an ll-year-i>ld who was shot in the 
head Saturday near an area where 
Palestinian militants and Israeli sol- 
diers had been exchanging fire 
repeatedly 

Before the burial, the boys coffin 
was taken lo his home in Rafah 
refugee camp, and his mother 
wailed, "my young child, don't leave 
me and go alone." and then fainted 

Al the cemetery, armed men fired 
into the air as a masked man told the 
crowd that the militant Islamic 
group Hamas had 10 more suicide 
bombers who were ready lo blow 





Abbe LoweN, attorney for Rep. Gary Condit, D-Calif., departs CBS 
studios after appearing on "Face the Nation " Sunday in Washington. 

Condit reveals affiair 
with missing intern 



Palestinian activists of the Defense Front for the Liberation of Palestine 
burn a U.S.flag during a march in Hebron on July 6. 



themselves up inside Israel Hamas 
has claimed responsibility for 
numerous bombings during the cur- 
rent Mideast conllicl 

Palestinian witnesses said al- 
Mugrabt and two other children 
were shot by Israeli soldiers from a 
guard lower some .^50 yards from 
where Ihe children had been play- 
ing 

The Israeli army has not com- 
mented on the boy s death 

Also Sunday, two Palestinian 
men were shot when they failed lo 
stop al an Israeli military check- 
point at Khan Yunis also in the 
southern CJaza Strip, hospital otTi- 
cials said. Their injuries were quite 



moderate and treatable, the hospital 
said 

In the West Bank city of Hebron, 
a Hamas activist was drugged from 
his vehicle while driving with his 
family, and his wife blamed Israeli 
security forces 

Ayoub Sharawi. u prominent 
Hamas figure in Hebron, was dri- 
ving it> his clothes shop in Hebron 
when .1 black. 4-whcel drive car 
pulled up in front of his car. block- 
ing his path, said his wife. Sadiych 

Three men wearing civilian 
clothes jumped out of the car. 
yelling. "Ciel out. get out." she 



CONGRESSMAN: Police 
say he is not su;^pect in 
disappejiniAce of Levy 



The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON Rep Gary 
Condit for the first lime told investi- 
gators he had a romantic relationship 
with Chandra Levy, a source familiar 
with the investigation said late 
Siilurday 

Bui police reiterated that ( ondit is 
not a suspect in the disappearance o( 
Ihe former federal intern 

In his third interview with 
Washington p»)lice and FBI agents 
Friday night ( ondil ackmiwledged 
that his rclalHMiship with Levy. 24. 
was more than a friendship. s;iid the 
source, who discussed the meeling on 
grounds of not being identified by 



name ( ondit had heen less direct in 
descnbing the relationship in two ear- 
lier interviews, the source said 

Terrancc (iainer. Washington's 
second-ranking police official, would 
not discuss the details ol the co- 
mmute interview, which Condit 
attended with his lawyer 

But Ciamer s;iid at a news confer- 
ence Salurdiiy that (ondit was fully 
co<»perative. answering every quev 
lion he was asked 

"The congressmiin was not a sus- 
pect before the meeting, the con- 
gressman was not a suspect during 
the meeting and the congressman is 
not a suspect since the meeting." 
(iainer s;iid 

Police had wanted more clarity 
from (ondit. IM'alif. about the 
nature y^i his relationship with Levy, 
fhe congressman had called her a 
"g(H>d friend. " but her relatives have 
described the relationship as inti- 
mate 



WORLD ft PiATION BRIEFS 



U.S. unemploynr>ent 
level on the rise 

The nation's unemploymenl rate dimbed to 
4.5 percent as the economy shed 1 14.000 more 
jobs m June, capping the biggest three-month 
job decline since the last recession a decade ago 

The 0.1 percentage point increase returned 
the joMess rate lo the same level as m April The 
jobless rate had temporarily dipped lo 4 4 per- 
cent in May 

The Labor Department reptirt on July 7 
showed that the |ob losses in June were ceiv 
lered m manufacturing, which .suffered its I Ith 
straight month of job cuts as factory workers 
continued to bear the brunt of the year-long eccv 
nomic siowdt>wn 

Employment was also weak last month in the 
service sector, where most Americans arc 
employed, adding just 5.(HK) jobN. the p«H)rest 
showing m 10 months 

The Bush administralKm insisted thai the 
economy will rebound in coming months. 



helped by the lax cut C ongress has 
passed and lower interest rates from 
Ihe Federal Reserve 

Many private economists were not 
as optimistic They said the rise in the 
unemployment rate, which had fallen lo a three- 
decade low of V9 percent last (Xtohcr. could 
raise fears among Americans about their own 
job prospects 

New Jersey woman 
injured in bull run 

At the stroke of ntH)n Friday in Pamp«>lona. 
Spain, in a storm of champjignc spray, ketchup 
bombs and joyful noise, crazed crowds opened 
yet another San Fermin. the ancient bull bash 
that Hemingway made famous 

Six people were badly g«>red including 
Jennifer Smith, a 29-year-old tourist from New 
Jersey. wh<i siiflered a foot-long wound inside 
her right thigh 

IJ.S Fmbas.sy spokesman Claude Young m 




Madrid wduld not release Smith's 
hometown, but confirmed that she 
underwent surgery and was in serious 
but stable condition 
Others were treated al first aid siatums 
along the HOO-yard run lo ihe bull ring 

Although Frnesl Hemingway p<ipulari/cd 
Pamplona s running of the bulls in 1927. the Siin 
Fermin fiesta is 400 years old As m his fictional 
account in The Sun Also Rises. " there was 
bkH)d in the streets 

Since the 1920s, bulls have killed 1 "S runners 
The last was in I99S a young American who fell 
down and then stixxi up instead t)t rolling inu> a 
ball 

Vatican immune from 
slowing economy 

The Vatican reported Us eighth straight year 
in the Nack |-rida\ attributing its financial sur 
plus largely to wise invesln»enls and favorable 
exchange rates 



■ We didn't fall into the Irap of the new econ- 
omy, " said economic chief ( ardinal SergK> 
Sebastian I 

Presenting the Vatican s annual financial 
statement, the cardinal announced a pain in 
2(MKi K^\ $8 5 million, listing ciwts at some 
$194 5 million and revenues of some $20^ mil- 
lion 

The Vatican posted the surplus despite a 
sharp rise in costs because of activitu-s related 
to the Holy Year in 2000. when the Vatican 
added ''0 employees to its 2.700-strong work- 
force 

Sebasliani thanked duxeses. religious associ- 
ations and faithful from around the world for 
conirihulmg to the Hol\ Sec saying economic 
autonomy lor the church is "the best guarantee 
of liberty in her mission of evangelization with- 
out dependence up<m the powerful of this 
world " 

The Vatican went through 2^ money-losing 
years until 1991 

Compiled from Daily Bruin wire reports 



Mijndav. Jul\ 9 2(K»1 



[)ailv Brum Nnws 



YOUTH 

From page 3 



Br.KA-t ni/ a lmirlh-\tMi wnrld 
.irt.s .iiiii culiurcs Ntudcni 

Vlikc dc la Rocha ihc prii|ccl\ 
nianaginj; iJirci.li>i said. Once 
vou connect with a pcrM)n Iron) a 
ditlcrcni experience. >c>u can see 
thai vou ha\e allies all over and 
thai discriniin.ilion is huriinj: 
cvervhodv Rcuardless ol tlie baj: 
iiaiie ol apartheid and discriniina- 
lion 111 ihiscouiiirv lixlav. the kids 
aic shovMiiu ihal thev can work 
lojieihci 

|)e la Rocha a lormcr 
I nderiirailuaie Students 

Association (Ouncil president 
has been atleclionatelv nick- 
named hv the vouni! artistsnis de 

!•' " 

Ihc So/c Project pri>- 

iiounced siv-/av' whose mis- 
sion Is to build a bridiie between 
vouii!-' people m St>uth Mnca and 
the I niieil States through the arts. 
is the dieam ol late I (1 A 
Protessoi Cieorue So/e \ ilakati 
and his student Michael Skolnik 

\ ilakati, who taught the Zulu 
language passed ,i\^.,\\ in ( )ctt>ber 
alter leturning to his native 
Swaziland and >crving as minister 
ol tourism Alter \ ilakati s pavs- 
ing his Inend^Skolnik Icit even 
more that the protect had to hap- 
pen 

This project is dedicated \o 
him Skolnik. executive director 
^ ol the So/e project, siiid ol the 
project > namesake 

llie voung artists who made his 
dream a realitv have made a tem- 
porarv home at I (LA with their 
mentors 21 individuals who hail 
Irom I OS Angeles and South 
\trica The mentors came to 
I ( 1 \ a week earlv ti> plan the 
art dance, music, writing and act- 



ing workshops in which the stu- 
dents will partake 

Im di)ing this because I in an 
immigrant. I come Irom a work- 
ing class lamiK and I had a reallv 
hard lime in school said hijOp 
vouth advi>cate Krancisca 
Marqut/. a lilth-ytMr Lalin- 
American studies and (hitanao 
studies student She added thai 
she lecls It Is her responsibilitv to 
provide guidance and intorma- 
tion to voung people 



"Everything we do Is 
unique just like you 

guys (Americans)." 

,1 

Jade Swartz 

Student 



Students were given journals 
and encouraged to talk to one 
.mother to lacilitate personal 
growth 

■ rhc dialogue is very central to 
changing misconceptions about 
the I niled Stales Our experi- 
ences as margmali/cd communi- 
ties and dominant communities 
delegitimi/e the idea that .America 
IS tree." de la R(K-ha said, adding 
that he is learning trom the youths 
whi> he describes as wise and 
remarkable women and men in lit- 
tle bodies ■ 

hor the S<»uth .Alritan mentors, 
the international arts exchange 
provides a chance to live m a for- 
eign country and dispel lalse per- 
ceptions about South Alrica 

Vou spend basically all your 
lite wanting to come here and 
once you are here, it teels like 
home, said Kholu kholopanc. a 



graduate student studying drama 
and film at Witwatersrand Many 
ol the artists echt)ed her scnli- 
ments, explaining that the ( S is 
like South Alrica in many ways 

I Americans I UmA like South 
Alncans. they act the same 
fcverything we do is unique just 
like you guys." said Jade Swart/. 
12. a student at Johannesburg 
(jirls SchtioJ 

Participants agreed that con- 
necting across cullures and experi- 
ences IS invaiuahie 

We re trying to create a pt>si- 
tive space where everyone can 
grow and learn Irom each other 
and where they can ni>t only rec- 
ogni/e and accept each other s 
contradictions, but als*i recogni/e 
each other s beauty.' de la Rncha 
said 

He added that the students. 
who have quickly grown to be like 
brothers and sisters, recogni/e the 
implications ot discrimination. 

"It doesn I matter where you're 
trom as long as sorneone is nice to 
you I'll get the most trom know- 
ing thev are just like me." siiid 
Cinirin Rammc. 1 1. a student at 
Culver City Middle SchtH>l who 
perlbrmed lor a crowd ol 2.5()0 in 
( uba last year as part ot the Sol 
Project, a predecessor to the S*)ze 
pri>jeci 

At the end ol the day mentors 
iind youth closed their activities 
with an umoia circle ■I'moja" 
means unity' in Ki-Swahili "rhc 
circle gave all involved an opptir- 
tunity to share their tcelings and 
sum up their day 

■ Tills IS a once-in-a-litctime 
opportunity." said Robert 
Rumncy. IV an actor and musi- 
cian trom Johannesburg 

For information about the Sow 
Project performances, visit 
www.eqop.org. 



PROTEST 

From page 1 

led students 

A lew hundred people gathered on 
the lawn, some wedged between multi- 
generational lamilies. others aUme 
because they were the onlv ones in then 
lamilies to leave Iran 

Meanwhile, the crowd chanted 
"death to the Iranian regime" m Parsi 

"The Islamic regime has been a ter- 
rorist regime." said Jimmy Sedghi. who 
advocates the return ot the ruling 
monarchy to Iran "We want the Tree 
world lo help bring democratic jus- 
tice " 

Thi>ugh the I W^) incident was a I'lKal 
point lor the gathering, many spoke ot 
ongoing troubles in the country Those 
who seek to end the current state ol the 
country are rallying lor new political 
leadership 

Sedghi said (he struggle is most 



MIDEAST 

From pages 

added 

Sharawi grabbed ht>ld ol the steering 
wheel as the men tried to pull him out 
ol the car His wife held onto him while 
three of their children sat in the back 
seat, screaming The three men 
smashed the front window and beat 
Sharawi until he relented and was dri- 
ven away, she said 

Sharawi. .^8. was imprisoned twice 
previously by the Israelis, and believed 
the Israeli forces were looking for him. 
his wife added 

The Israelis had no immediate com- 
ment on the incident 

However. Israel has said it will con- 
tinue to target suspected Palestinian 
militants unless the Palestinian 
Authority acts 

"If these people are at large, we have 



intense for those between the ages of 
18-25 

"Particularly the students have been 
a target." he said "The government is 
trying lo kill them so they scare them 
from activism " 

Scdghi also said that women were 
especially vulnerable to abuses 

Azar Na.seri was one of the women 
who left the country and her husband 

"Thank God I got divorced before 
the revolution If not. I would have had 
no rights, " Naseri said 

Naseri said many women she knew 
did not attend universities because they 
were pressured to enter the sex market 
in order to go to school. 

However, the protesters said the 
silence has been broken by their pres- 
ence which they hope will raise ^aware- 
ness 

"A lot of people have been stoned to 
death, women have been raped in jail. " 
Sedghi said "We're asking the free 
world to support pur cause." 



a right lo exercise self-defense and pre- 
vent terrorist attacks." said Ranaan 
Ciissin. a spokesman for Israeli Prime 
Minister Ariel Sharon 

in the West Bank town of Nablus. a 
Palestinian court convicted 4 
l^tlestlnlan man of working with Isrifd 
to orchestrate the killings of two 
Palestinians. 

Thacr Jaber was wi n tc i inid to fife 
imprisonment with hard labor for his 
role in a May 12 Israeli helicopter 
attack m the northern West Bank town 
of Jenin 

The sentence failed to satisfy rela- 
tives of the two Palestinians who were 
killed 

"It's not fair, he must be sentenced 
to death." siiid Katima Sabaa. sister of 
one of the slam men. Moutasem Sabba 

Since Mideast fighting began almost 
10 months ago. .'^10 people on the 
Palestinian side and 121 on the Israeli 
side have been killed." . 



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RESOLUTION 

From page 1 

treated with hostility h\ other 
students 

NEA President Bob Chase 
added that gay teachers can lice 
losing their job for being open 
about their sexual orientation. 

The decisK>n to designate the 
la.sk force for Resolution New B 
came on July 5. the second da\ 
of the NEA's meeting and two 
days after 6(K) protesters with 
signs reading, "schools are for 
education not indoctrination'" 
picketed the NEA's meeting 

The decision to withdraw the 
resolution was made to the cha- 
grin of UCLA LGBT studies 
Professor Peter Hamm<mds. 
who said he feared creation of a 
task force was "no more than a 
delaying action " 

**Like other minorities. 
(LGBT) resistance to injuv 
tices IS a proud aspect ol 
American history. " Hammtmds 
said in an e-mail "It's disgrace- 
ful that the NEA does not 
regard materials on the continu- 
ing struggles oi LGBT people as 
worthy of consideration m 



materials designed to educate 
students about American sock 
et> 

One protester. Alexandria 
Coronado. a trustee for the 
Anaheim I nion High Schmil 
district, said the resolution "pnv 
vides for a radical stKial agenda 
that the vast majority ol 
American people do not sup- 
port " .' , 

Chase said the NEA was mm 
inlluenced b\ the protests 

"We will not allow our polic> 
or our discussions to be dK'tated 
by any outside group, particu- 
larK those that wish to demit- 
gogue on the issue instead of 
focusing on the needs and prob' 
lems of these students." he said 

Cath\ Kigel. ctxhair o\ the 
NEA s ga\ and lesbian caucus, 
said a task force is a step tor- 
ward 

"This IS an emotiomil topic 
for everyone and we believe a 
task force is the best wa> to hear 
everyone s voice and then devel- 
op actions that will create safer 
schot»ls for children and stafl." 
she said 

With reports from Daily Bruin 
wire services. 



BUDGET 

From pdgf 1 

ken with Chancellor Albert Carnesalc to obtain 
an insider's viewpoint about what programs are 
most important to I'CLA 

While the UC's core budget increase request 
will m<ist likely not be met. some I '( programs 
are expected to be funded As of nou. luiuJs tor 
the four I'C science institutes, including 
UCLA's Nanosystems Institute, are contained 
in the budget. Hay ward said 

But all that could change 

Svonkin said until the assembh can get four 
more members to approve the budget, nothing 
is solid " 

Even then. Gov Gra\ Da\is. who is working 
w ith a much decreased budget reserve, can veto 
certain parts of the budget and until he signs it. 
nothing IS assured. Hayward said 

•C oncern that the slate government will not be 
able le fund DC programs is nothing new 

Four months ago when ICL.A students, staff 
and alumni lobbied before elected officials to 
push for DC funding, both V(.' representatives 
and elected olTicials realized the energv crisis 
might restrict the slate s funds for the 
liniversily's progranM. 

Hayward said the energy crisis has left state 
funds for I ( programs insufTicient 

"In May. it became increasingly clear that the 
state's fiscal situation was darkening. " Hayward 
said. 



PARTY 

From page S 



lacked in areas but the people 
still believe in the PAN.' said 
hrancisco Ortiz, editor ol the 
weeklv newspaper Zeta. pre- 
dicting victorv lor I ox s part) 

The PR I and other opp*>si- 
tion parties, mired in internal 
fighting and intense restructur- 
ing efforts, have failed to otYcr 
an attractive alternative to the 
\*\\. said Tama Hernandez, a 
political analyst at the ColegKt 
de la Erontera Norte 

"There has been no real talk 
about an alternative here." she 
siiid "There are no other v lable 
options "' 

Polls show that the PR Is 
gubernatorial candidate. 

Daniel Qumiero. a 51-year-old 
former federal lavCmaker who 
has campaigned as the "new 
wave" ot his pariv. has not 
pt>sed much ol a threat to PAN 
candidate Eugenio Elorduy. M. 
a popular former mayor of the 
stale capital. Mexicali 

Ek>rduy. a car dealership 
owner, was campaign manager 
for Ernesto Ruflo. Bajfa 



California's first National 
Actmn Party gi>vernor He 
laler served as finance secre- 
tary in RulVo's administratH>n. 
leading the fighi lo obtain more 
tederai funding lor the Ntale 

The National Actmn Party 
has won governorships in the 
Mexican states of Chiapas. 
Yucatan and Jalisco since 
Eox's 2(MKl win 

Because the P.AN s victory 
m Baja California is seen as a 
ti>regi>ne conclusion, many 
may simply not bother voting 
at all. said Hernande/. the 
political analyst Voter turnout 
in Baia California dropped 
from SO percent m the last 
decade to 50 percent m last 
year s presidential elections 

"lis very probable ihc P.A\ 
could steal the whole shi>w in 
Baja t alifornia." Hernandez 
s;tid 

Iwo exceptions to the 
pan's predicted sweep could 
lake place in the city (it -lecate. 
where polls show the PR I has a 
gixxj chance ot winning, and 
the bt»rder city ot Iijuana. 
where populist PR I candidate 
Jaime Martinez V'eloz has won 
support i>l ihe p«K>r 





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ALGERIA 

From page 2 

lhcarm> 

The insurgcncs has terrorized the country 
and h»)bbled its ability to attract lureign part- 
ners in development pn>jcct.s one reasum whv 
the subway pro)ccl has come to a near-hall 

rhe government launched the project m 
1982 to relieve congestion in the severely over- 
crowded capital ot 3 milium people 

Since I "WO. major construction has taken 
place on only lour ol the 16 proposed stations 
along the first route French and Polish engi- 
neering experts letl the country when the vnv 
lencc-worsened in the earK IW()s 



■ ■ We ha vc been forced to work with Algeruin 
companies that lacked npertisc.*' said 
Abdeikader Mekrebi. who heads the subway 
project lor Algeria s Transportation Ministry 
"The security situation really disturbed things ' 

Algeria is now working with the World Bank 
to find a loreign investor lor the $ I billion priv 
ject. because the government can't tinance it 
aU)nc 

But Algerians «y #ere ili tiniy one rataon 
lor a natK)n so rich in natural wealth to be so 
short ol money corruption and theft by the 
shadowry military clique that holds ultimate 
power in this nation ol M) million pet>ple 

"We have a lot ol oil and giis. but no money," 
said Zouiche as he continued to watt-teiil 
"All the money is in Switzerland " ' " • 



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1^ AusiiMN* (left) and others listen to Professor 

of the University of Maryland speak in Hershey Hall 



The pri>gram began thiN summer, 
after two years ol plunnmg. wtth a 
gram trom the Andrew W Mellon 
Foundation and support from the 
Graduate Division al UCLA 

Melvctte Melvin. a lourth-yeur 
English education student al Bennet 
College, said sessions wtth the facul- 
ty arc helpful 

"(The experience) helped me to 
create a firm foundation on which to 
create m> research." she said "We 
are brought together by so many 
black scholars to help u> mature in 
our thinking ' 



PROGRAM 

from page 1 

Tsekani Browne, a graduate stu- 
dent in history, said he chose to 
attend UCLA because faculty mem- 
bers were accessible to him 

"Thats the rea.>on I'm still here at 
UCLA, because of the mentorship." 
he said 

According to Browne, the great- 
est limitation of the program is 
cramming the workshops, faculty 
meetings and field trips into a four- 
week period. As the program 
e.xpands. he hopes il will span six 
weeks and include up to SO students 



DtSTRKT 

Fro(npa9e4 

Imperial Ct>unty"s population and 
that might help Vargas win a congrev 
sional aem. 

Filncr. a San Diego DcmtK-rat who 
defeated Vargas m congressional pri- 
maries in 1992 and 1996. figures he 
might be the loser the next time around 
if leit with no place to run but tiiat bor- 
der district. 

He s been lobbying lawmakers in 
Siicramento \o leave his southern San 
Diego County district pretty much as it 
m. 

•*Cleiirty this is an attempt by 
Vargas to undercut mc. I assume." he 
recently told the San Diego Union- 
Tribune "What he's really doing is 
undercutting the constituents and 
undercutting the border I'll run in any 
district they give me. but this is really a 
stupid idea " 

Limiting border communities to 
one representative would weaken its 
clout. Kilnei says I urrently three 
members of C ongress I ilner and 
Reps Susan [>avis. D-San Dieg«>. and 



Wrtb reports from Michaele Tumage. 
Daily Brum Senior Staff 



Duncan Hunter. R-Alpine - represent 
districts that tiHich on the border 

Vargiis siiys f-ilncr is "afraid of his 
ow n shad«>w " and is "one i>f the most 
selfish politicians I have ever seen " 

But Vargas says he hasn I decided if 
he siipp<»rts the single-btirder-district 
prop«>siil. s;iying the idea came from "a 
whole lot of people" at a recent San 
Dieg«) hearing on redistricting. not 
from him 

He says he'll run for re-ek'ction to 
the Assembly in 2002 and hasn t decid- 
ed what he'll do after that 

Legislators who don i run tor anoth- 
er pt>st when they have the chance 
could find themselves in Strom- 
Martin s position 

She passed up the oppt>rtunity to 
run lor the sl.iic Seiuitc after her first 
term in the Assembly and now is faced 
with waiting until 2006 [o run She says 
she won't challenge Sen Wesley 
Chesbro. r>Arcata. when she s termed 
out ol the Assembly next year 

"I was exhausted." she said 
"(Another campaign) was the last 
thing t>n m\ mind Nou. in retrospect. 
I think. "Cicx". I put myself in the p«>si- 
tion where I have to wan f(Uir vears '" 



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oint 



Next %veek a columnist will 
argue why it's in the best 
interests of the US to keep 
China out of world trade 

vi«wpoint#*ine(lta.ucU.e<ki 



'Quarterlife crisis' frazzles power-hungry youth 



AMBITION: Path lo success puts 
m(>r»('\ t)\rr happiness, leaves 
Iweritv-somelhin^s urituirilled 

You ni.t\ hj\c hciird ot or witnessed the 
midlilc criM- o\ nuintlcss l(»riv-.st»mc- 
ihings. but 111 bet you havent heard 
.iboui ihc ncu trend in ncrvouN breakdown> 
that mas await voii 'n ynur immediate posl-col- 
leue years the "quarterlite criM.s ' 

Despite the slogans you 
hear trom prolessors and 
CNN about cconomn. 
opportunities" and 'living 
in the best ol times " 
many \oiing adults lre>h 
out ol college are hitting 
one i>l the most depress- 
ing inoinenis ol then lives 
.It e.irlici age> 

\ rtveni New ^ork 
I mu-> article i Is TIhn tlu 
I ace ol a Midiile 
( riM> '■ June 2^ i explores ~~ 

lheli\esi<I many indi\idu- 
ah in their late 2()s to early Mh These people 
graduated trom l\y League schoi>ls and estab- 
lished theniselve^ as successlul citi/ens and 
maior pl.iyers in the global corporate market 
with ^l\-dlglt salario 

^et a> the article points out main o! these 
■.ucce^slul people are beginning to question the 
direction ol their lives and e\en the point ol 
their evistence ii describes what people are 
now calling the quarterlite crisis ' 

The quarierlile crisis is basically a midlile 
criMs experienced at an early age like 2N 
I >ually. when people think i>l the midlile crisis 

Lalas IS a fourth-year international developrnent 
studies and political science student who chal 
lenges you to question your beliefs and assunfip 

tions 





Ui- •• ItNI.I/tWt^ Hill" 



the American Beauty' image ot a sedated 
kevin Spacey sitting in his jail ceil-like cubicle 
at work or a tranlic Annette Benning breaking 
d«>wn because she Tailed to make a real-estate 
sale may immediately come to mind 

But hardly anyone expects lo find them- 
selves laced with the prospect ol an untulfilling 
hie at what is supposed lo be the crux ol their 



"good-timing" 20s 

What can explain such a contradiction ■'• 
While there is probably more than one 
aiLswer to (his question. 1 believe that the struc- 
ture of university life and s«Kiely's expectations 
ol young adults help to set the conditions Tor 
the quarterlile crisis The money drivtn mental- 
ity that pcrvadeii institutiun^ ol higher learning 



- especially prestigious oncs> - diverts people's 
attention trom reflecting upon their own lives 
and asking the tundamental question. "Am I 
happy'" 

From the beginning o( grade school, many 
of us at UCLA have been expected to strive for 
the best grades and participate in the most 
extracurricular activities so that we can build 
up our resume to get into the lop colleges. 
Meanwhile, we arc encouraged to participate 
in community service that oftentimes ends up 
becoming mere token feel-good efforts that do 
little lo imprt>ve the lives of tttosc most in need. 

Afterward, once we arc admitted into a 
world-renowned university, we arc uncritically 
taught to work toward law schwil. medical 
schiH)l. business schtK)l or to get hired by a 
major tlrm or company where we can make 
lots of m^tney. settle down in a suburb and have 
1.2 kids 

But amid all o\ this drive lo succeed and this 
blind ambition, we may find ourselves without 
ihe time to slop and really ask whether or not 
we feel fulfilled Consequently, the conflicts 
that arc avoided during college reemerge once 
more 

Yet what can explain the fact that the ner- 
vous breakdown takes place at an earlier age 
than the midlile crisis ' This can again be 
attributed to the unique time that we find our- 
selves in The expectation that we folU>w the 
standard path of "success" is^tlol stronger 
than ever 

Our stKiety s paragons of virtue are not 
human and civil rights fighlers like A Phihp 
Randolph. Philip Vera Cruz or Dolores 
Huerta. but corporate leaders like Bill Gales 
and Sieve Jobs Everyday, people pay financial 
worship lo multinalional corporations such as 
Wal-Mart. McDonald's and Nike 

Many of us have been socialized lo dream 
that we may one day hold positions of financial 
pi>wer that expand beyond U.S borders The 



LETTERS 



UCLA committed 
to celebration of 
diversity 

Id like lo respond lo Israel 
lalavera Jr s letter titled l C LA 
should ban identity-based gradua- 
tions I Daily Brum \iewpoinl 
July 2) 

It seems ob\ious that 
lalavera s e\pi)sure to diversity is 
limited only iv the different types 
ol fonts that are displayed on the 
computer screen when he attends 
hiN 'Online Bible C ollege " 

I nlike his online college 

I ( L.A Is a universitv that s com 
prised ot people trom many dil- 
lerent ethnicities, religions 
national origins, sexes and gasp 

sexual orientations 
Out ot Ignorance. I.ilavera 
.issumes that everybody ai I C LA 
opposes celebrating diversity 
when m truth, most ol us embrace 

II This tact was most apparent 
when thousands of I C LA stu- 
dents held massive protests in 
opposition ot SP-I and 2 and 
Proposition 2(W 

I urthermore the fact that bet 
erosexuals attend the lesbian, gay. 
bisexual and iransgender gradua- ' 
lion ceremony, and that diflcreni 
races and ethnicities attend cere- 
monies not specilically aimed at 
ihcm provide evidence that the 
I ;CLA community is commitlcd 



10 celebrating diversity 

And what about Talavera s 
own inflammatory lellcr'' Would 
the Daily Bruin have printed it if 

11 was not interested in including 
a diverse range of opinions'' I 
hope that Talavera would one day 
open his mind to the fact that 
there are other people out there 
wh<i do not harbor his spiteful 
and ignorant views 

StWM rTWMtt 

Aliiiimus 



Recklessness of 
few should not 
punish everyone 

Howard thernin s letter is one 
ol the most misinformed pieces I 
have had the misfortune to read 
in the Daily Brum C Zerivtoler- 
ance policy ultimately protects 
students. Viewpoint July 2) He 
condones age discrimination 
against IH- to 2tt-year-old adults 
.ind blithely provides a rationale 
tor totalitarianism 

According to Chernin fairness 
IS not a legitimate criterion by 
which to judge a law Instead, wc 
musi be ready and willing to 
abjure our rights so that the gov- 
ernment can protect us fr«)m our- 
selves He insinuates that the irre- 
sponsibility of the few negates the 
rights of the many I challenge 



Chernin to name a right that has 
not been abused at some point by 
a lew unscrupulous individuals 

Every election, someone some- 
where mlentionally cheats and 
votes multiple times Shall we 
abdicate our right lo vole because 
of such abuses' The inevitable 
consequence of Chernins solectv 
tic logic IS the abolition of all 
rights and the institution of a 
totalitarian nanny state 

t would also a.sk Chernin if the 
encroachment of the stale into all 
aspects of life since the time of 
President F D Roosevelt has 
resulted in a more responsiWe 
populace Chernin fails to com- 
prehend the inherent recipriKity 
ot rights and responsibilities 

Chernin justifies campus prohi- 
bition o\ alcohol on the grounds 
that It protects students under the 
age of 21 The opposite is true 
The policy drives students off- 
campus to drink at parties or in 
their cars Furthermore, students 
under 21 have received a bad rap 
from the propaganda of the feder- 
al government and Mothers 
Against Drunk Driving, aided 
and abetted by the scnsationahstic 
news media 

College students are no more 
likely to drink themselves to death 
than the general population, it 
simply IS not considered newswor- 
thy when a paunchy, middle-aged, 
blue-collar worker drinks himself 
to death or falls off a balcony in a 



drunken stuptir The worst drunk- 
driving offenders are not those 
under 21. but those o\ 25 lo 35 
years of age 

It IS lime to end the era of uni- 
versity prohibition The drinking 
age should be lowered to IK A 
policy of individual resp<insibility 
regarding alcohol should be insti- 
tuted in place of zero-ttilerance 



Responsibility of 
drinking not 
defined by age 

Howard Chernins letter criti- 
cizing my submission does not 
accurately reflect nor address the 
real issue that I sought to bring 
out ("ZertMolerance policy ulti- 
mately protects students." Daily 
Brum. Viewpoint. July 2). His 
logic as to why the zero-lolerance 
policy exists is also deficient in 
recognizing what observations I 
made 

Furthermore, the policy does 
not survive solely because of the 
desire lo discriminate but instead 
the political immobility of the 
people aflccted 

Nevertheless. Chernin informs 
us that "the university does not 
support the consumption of alco- 
hol by students, either because it 
IS harmful lo themselves, (or) lo 



their education or to the commu- 
nity at large " 

But neither self-deslruclive 
activities nor drunk driving are 
unique to students or individuals 
under the age of 21 

If this were the case, then h 
would make sense to bar 'the 
majority" of students because of 
the danger that a headstrong per- 
son under 21 would abuse the 
right lo drink But one's responsi- 
bility with alcohol has nothing to 
do with age 

If we follow the logic of 
Chernin "s argument to comple- 
tion, then no one at the university, 
including faculty and staff, should 
have the right to consume alcohol 
because of the danger it poses lo 
the student population either 
through accidents, or acts of vio- 
lence, etc 

It IS precisel^Jhis type of atti- 
tude that Chernin has that allows 
the university to avoid dealing 
directly with a safe and sensible 
alcohol policy 

Ultimalely. if the policy of 
Prohibition really worked, then 
why would nearly two-thirds of 
students drink at least occasional- 
ly" 

Probably because they know 
what the administration docs not 
the minimum drinking age law is 
a joke 




Daily Brum Virwpmat 



Mondiiy. July U. 2(M)I II 



Bush misrepFesented as nature's foe 




FOUCY: President works 
lo create balance l)etween 
environment, economy 

He thmks global warming 
means a relaxation of Cold 
War tensions He probably 
believes that a thick layer of carbon 
dioxide emissions hovering t)vcr the 
U.S would make a wonderful mis- 
sile defense sys- 
tem Worst of 
all. he IS a ruth- 
less oilman out 
to strip the land 
of all Us pre- 
cious restnirces 
He IS Satan s 
spawnl 

The 
Democrats 
couldn't be 
happier if you 
and I blindly 
accept this ^^~"^~^~^^~" 

image of 

President (ieorge W Bush Ever 
since his inauguration, they have 
painstakingly attempted to portray 
Bush as the worst thing that has hap- 
pened to the environment since plas- 
tic grocery bags. 

According to a recent 
Washington Post poll. M) percent t»f 
Americans now disapprove ot 
Bushs handling of environmental 
issues, compared lo a ^1 -percent duv 
approval rating in March 
(Washington Post-ABC News 
Poll. June }) 

Before this improper bias goes 
any further, allow me to clarify the 
record on Bush's environmental 
policies and show you just how ludi- 
crously misrepresented they are. 
Although Bush might not be as 
green as a leprechaun on St Paddy "s 
Day. his policies strike a common- 
sense balance between economic 
and environmental concerns. 

This balance was recently demi>n- 
strated by Bush With his propi>siil to 
drastically cut back the 6 million 
acres of oil drilling area in the Gulf 
of Mexico - a propi>sal made by lor- 
mer president Bill Clinton in 1997 

Harwen is a political scierKe and history 
student Sooner or later, you will 
succumb to bis views Send your 
oblKtions to kxhesmitb^^tKitmaiLcom 



In response lo environmental 
complaints. Bush decided last week 
to scale back Clinton s insensitive 
plan from 6 million acres to only 15 
million acres This also pushes back 
the minimum drilling boundaries off 
the Florida coast from 17 u> 100 
miles finder this plan, while prtv 
tecling the envir»»nment. Bush does 
not forget that we desperately need 
lo find new forms of domestic ener- 
gy sources 

But because the bubble of I K'LA 
IS protected from blackouts, it allows 
students to be insensitive lo the reali- 
ly of Cahlornias energy crisis 

This IS evident when Joe Brum 
goes out to grab a bite lo eat. he 
leaves his dorm or apartment with 
every light. TV. computer and stereo 
left on. then takes ihe elevator down 
two fliHirs io get to his gavguz/hng 
SL'V. which he drives around 
WestwiHKJ for 20 minutes trying to 
find parking so he can eat at In-N- 
Out Is It a wonder why J(K' Brum 
then sees no problem with demand- 
ing a complete moratorium on 
power-plant construction and oil 
drilling' 



President Bush's 

sensible policy 

accepts that you 

can't have your cake 

and eat it too. 



In light tjf the current energy cri- 
sis and in order to maintain the stan- 
dard of living that Americans crave, 
it IS crucial for Ihc L niled Stales to 
increase our oil and natural gas 
reserves in uddiiion to implementing 
energy conservation programs The 
oil and natural gas in Bush s priv 
posed drilling area is enough lo 
power the cars of I million 
American families for six years 

Issues like this are often charac- 
terized as "the economy versus the 
environment "' President Bush 
shows that It need not be either or. 
but that we can arrive at sensible 
compromises that satisfy both inter- 
ests Someone needs to lell the 
Sierra Club that when discussing 
issues oi the environment, it is not a 



crime lo keep the economy in mind 

Bush took a drastic drop in 
approval ratings because he tot>k the 
IS out of the Kyoto global warm- 
ing agreement How evil of him! 

Some environmental groups have 
depicted the Kyoto Protocol as the 
ultimate solution to the world's car- 
bon dioxide emission problem, and 
that Bush's refusal to sign it is the 
death knell fi>r any hopes of L'.S 
reductions 

In reality, the treaty is more fatal- 
ly flawed than the parking situation 
at I'CLA Under the Kyt>lo agree- 
ment, the United Slates would have 
to reduce its emissions of green- 
house gases by 7 percent below 1990 
levels by 2012 The problem is that it 
exempts such rapidly industriali/ing 
nations as China, the worlds second 
largest source of greenhouse gases, 
and India, the world's fiflh largest 
source It is of little wonder then 
that little support exists for the , 
treaty outside of the European 
Union. 

So. maybe you still think that 
Bush IS on a crusitde to rum the envi- 
ronment This can he forgiven 
because the media has only publi- 
cized the ct)ntroversial aspects of his 
environmental policy 

You havent heard anything from 
Tom Brokaw abi>ut Bush s creation 
i>l'lhe U.S Climate Change 
Research Initiative to identify solu- 
tions to global warming, or his 
National Climate Change 
Technology Initiative to develop 
technology lor monitoring green- 
house gas emissu>ns 

Why isn't the liberal media talk- 
ing about Bushs decision to relocate 
a radioactive waste dump near the 
Colorado River so ihat 2K.0<K) gal- 
lons of contaminated water will stop 
leaking into the river which supplies 
our drinking water'' 

What else has Bush done for the 
environment that theC ALPIRC 
people would never admit to when 
they hit you up for money on Brum 
Walk' 

Bush also recently decided to halt 
military bombing on Vieques Island 
in Puerto Rico, which has caused 
great environmental damage and 
harm to the islanders health lor 60 
years In addition, he rejected Ciov 
Davis" requests that the Bush admin- 




• i 



ignores consequences of sex 



CHOICES: Students chase 
pleasure without regard 
for pregnancy, emotions 



I 



I would seem somewhat cruel to 
prevent a woman from having 
some say over what lo do with 
whatever goes on in her body. 

On the other 
hand, the opti- 
mal time lo 
decide whether 
to have an 
abortion is not 
when a rapidly 
growing 
embryo has 
established a 
form of life 
The decision to 
create a life 

should be made — — ^— ^— ^— 
prior lo that 

point I Infortunalely. this decision 
IS treated in an all t(H> cavalier man- 
ner by young and old alike. 

The sex urge is arguably one of 
the strongest human desires and it 
should be Without it. humanity 




VynMI 



yourdngiistiMi 
HvyffionQ M 
udft«du. 



would not be able to priKreatc 
effectively, especially with all the 
activities that constantly vie for our 
attention 

Many reject the conservative 
advocacy of abstinence and 
embrace the gratification that 
comes with sexual liberation. 

The media pushes these exploits 
on various levels m commercials, 
mainstream films, music videos, 
men's and women's magazines 
(Maxim. Cosmop<ilitan). TV shows 
( "Sex m the City" ) and of cmirse 
aduh enteriamment in its many 
manifestations 

Alt of these emphasize the plea- 
sure of sex But what has not fol- 
lowed IS a serious discussion of its 
possible consequences, leaving pe«v 
pie al a definite disadv antage if the 
"unspeakable' <Kcurs pregnancy 

In some cases, such discussions 
arc not actively encouraged, 
prompting young people lo experi- 
ment for themselves Those who 
enier college arc expected lo be sex- 
ually astute, if not already sexually 
active 

The pleasures of sex are commu- 
nicated to others through parties, 
discussions among friends, perstmal 
relationships and even the bath- 
room stalls Until the fateful 
ntoment. many do not think of the 



consequences And by then, it's 
often too late 

Added to this is the advent of 
effective condoms, which have sub- 
stantially reduced the "risk" of 
unwanted pregnancy With this pr<v 
tection also come feelings that 
encourage reckless actions and 
promiscuity 

Many students think that they 
must "try it oul. " "be a man." "feel 
like a woman." "show that I love 
this person." "keep my reputation " 
Babies are only a passing thought, 
like a nightmare that has been ban- 
ished to the inner recesses of the 
mind 

With this impunity comes a feel- 
ing that abortion is yet another 
option to prevent unwanted chil- 
dren Our sexual freedoms increase 
but our ^e^sl ol responsibility over 
our own b«>dies decreases substan- 
tially 

Therein lies the disturbing reality 
of freely exploring the limits of sex- 
ual pleasures 

In the past, the thought of having 
a baby scared many people into 
being extremely cautious about hav 
ing intimate relations Th«ise who 
were not so cautiwis were looked 
upon, justly or not. as irresponsible 



12 



PEuents divorce maturity, 
resort to childish actions 



RUIMLY: Knowing Mom 
and Dad aren't perfect can 
be a heartening rtn elation 



By 

Th* Parthenon 

University Wire 

It sure isn't easy raising parents 
these days They're more trouble 
now then 2 1 years ago w hen I first 
started out Id always thought 
once past the midlife crises the 
worst would be over, but boy was I 
ever wrong. - 

I have always prided myself on 
being fair and 

supportive, but ^.^_^_^^^^ 
raising three 
parents as an 
only child can 
take Us loll on 
any kid and 
believe me. I'm 
getting gray 
hairs as proof 
The past few 

mimths, how- 

ever, have truly 
tested my par- 
ent rearing skills and ability to love 
unconditionally 

Over the past couple of years I 
watched my mother and step- 
father s relationship wither down 
lo nothing It didn t take a genius 
lo figure out the incessant bicker- 
ing. pers(»nal differences and over- 
all mutual disrespect for one anoth- 
er would inevitably end in divorce, 
.so the news didn't come as a real 
shiK'k 

I was fully ^^^^^^^__^ 

prepared for 
the day the 
movers came 
to the house I 
watched them 
divide belong- 
ings and pack 
our memories 

without a sec- 

onds hesita- 
tion Having 

been through a divorce already 
with my other lather. I knew what 
lo expect It s just one of those 
things parents go through some- 
times It s not something I detested 
in either case, in fact, it was always 
the right answer. 

I knew my life would change 
though Never again would we all 
sit down for Thanksgiving dinner 
or take another family vacation 
Instead Id spent holiday breaks 



I slowly watched my 

parents act less and 

less like adults and 

more and more like 

barracudas. 



I guess It's safe to 

presume my mother 

didn't have sex just 

that one time either. 



traveling the country lo visit my 
parents m their separate homes 
My free time would be scarce, but 
still a small sacrifice for all the joy 
of being a child 

' Nonetheless, everything seemed 
pretty much under control, or so I 
thought The real shtK'k came later 
as I slowly watched my parents act 
less and less like adults and more 
like barracudas It was shocking 
becau.se I thought I raised them 
better 

I was appalled by their actions I 
couldnt believe two intelligent, 
well-educated people could act so 
childishly And over what"' Money? 
Having to share retirements'' Lifes 
unfairness' Or 
^^__^_^_^ even old bat- 
tles ' 

It v^as infuri- 
ating because 
neither one of 
ihem ever 
looked at them- 
selves for laull. 
My parents - 
the civfounders 
of existential- 
ism It was 
almost more 
than I could handle 1 thought it 
reflected me as the child 

Then. I began to reflect on my 
own life Memories of my fresh- 
men year of college slapped me in 
the face hard enough to leave quite 
an impressionable mark It made 
me realize everybody makes mis- 
takes, even my parents And in ret- 
rospect I realize their mistakes 
can't even compare lo my own 

Its just hard 
^^__^^__^ to realize your 
parents aren't 
perfect At 
times they seem 
almost non- 
human and 
incapable of 
doing wrong 
This latest fias- 

CO has really 

opened my 
eyes I guess it s 
safe to presume my mother didn i 
have sex just that one time either 
And I thought it was all smooth 
sailing until the time came to pick 
out the nursing home 

I love my parents more today 
than ever before Knowing they're 
not perfect sure has lifted the bur- 
den off my shoulders I just hope 
my unconditional love comes full 
circle, especially before my Visa 
bill arrives this month. 



Write here. 

Right now! 

Become a Daily Bruin 

Online Viewpoint 

columnist! 



Applications are now available in 

the Daily Bruin office at 118 

Kerckhoff Hall. They 

are due in Cuauhtemoc Ortega's 

box Thursday, Oct. 4, by 5 p.m. 



12 Monday. July 9. 2(H) r 



Uatiy Bruin Viewpoint 



Dr. Patrick Doyle, O.D. 

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LINENS-N-THINGS 

TWilT «: A GREAT IDEA 



All the warm cofiiforts of home 

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U 2 Sheet Sets (IrKludes flat, 
fitted arHl pillowcases.) 
CtiecK with your college to 
see if you need X lor^ sheets. 

Zi 1 Comforter (Choose either 
poly-filled or down.) 

U 2 Duvet Covers ( If you cfNJse 
a down comforter.) 

O 2 Blar>kets (It's always good 
to t\aNe an extra.) 

Q 2 Pillows 

Q 4 Pillow Protectors 

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For wf>en the cafeteria isn't 

serving your favorites - 

especially around 

12:00 midnight: 

Q Flatware 

Q 1 DorrrvSize Microwave 

Q 1 Oorm-Size Refrigerator 

LJ 2 Microwave Dinner ware Sets 

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3 1 Vacuum 



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LALAS 

From page 19 

dream ul becoming corporate giant;, 
with multiple inveiitments. lour dif- 
ierent houses, a yachi and a herrari 
K355 has never been stronger 

I believe thai Bey once Knowles of 
Destiny's Child said i( besL "I'm 
young. I want a certain amount ol 
money and by the lime I'm 30. 1 
don'l want to work" ( MTV. July 4). 
With popular stars making such 
statements, it's no wonder thai chil- 
dren learn to pursue individual moi>- 
etary interests al early ages 

The pressure and the expectation 
U) become financially well-olT has led 
students to pursue material and 
monetary satisfuctum without devel- 
oping any sense ot critical under- 
standing or compassion A college 
education simply becomes a means 
lo an end. rather thim an end itKit. 
where students question the realities 
they have been presented with and 
critically examine their own lives. 

Like heartless robots, we arc 
expected to program our luture for 
the next 10 years and go about our 
day-to-day lives toward some goal 
thai has been outlined tor us We 
become more and more alienated 
IVom our communities and even our 
classmates Students no longer are 
people with their own unique experi- 
ences and personalities, instead, they 
too arc only used as study buddies, 
or represent mere competition to be 
defeated 

The New York Times article 
describes Jeff Meyer, a software 
engineer, who found himself m a 
quarterlifc crisis Bombarded by the 
idea thaniumbers and sciences ruled 
the world, he was led to believe that 
the idea of working for the commu- 
nity was "absurd ' But when Meyer 
left college, he 'realized there's a lot 
of materialism that comes along with 
the engineering field and there has to 
be a place for emotion." 

I I IS this lack of huntan compas- 
sion and increased alienation thai 
has helped to contribute to people's 
quarterlife cnsis 

In the search for the holy grail of 
fortune, we lose our ability lo feel for 
others, especially those who have 
been oppressed Withoui thai com- 
passion, our lives become devoid of 
love The fad is that in our limes of 
extreme individualism, the connec- 
tion with our community gets br»> 
ken and we end up forgetting lo stop 
and appreciate the beauty (hat sur- 
rounds us. 

Many of us. in our desire to "suc- 
ceed." avoid conflia and select the 
easiest road where we'H meet the 
least resistance Bui we must stnve 
to not lose contract with that human 
compassion that provides us with 
comfort and fulfillment 

Otherwise, we will find ourselves 
becoming slaves to our own success. 
The cars, jewelry and mansions that 
we consume will end up consuming 
us We will find ourselves in a quar- 
terlifc crisis going mad Now is the 
best time to quotioa yourself aad 
your reality 

Trust me. you do not want lo 
wake up lo your job five years from 
now isolated, regretful and uMlutppy 
on Monday mornings, wishing it 
were Saturday. 



HAYMOND 

Ffimipigell 



lledonists 

Today, we have the 'mominf- 
after' pill, the latex cgaiowi. tke 
early-period abortion, the late-peri- 
od abortion, and il carried to full 
term, the help orreiati>fes in raMmf 
a child 

All kinds of excuses can be made 
for not taking care of pregiuincies 
and children Some are quite valid. 



T 



Diiily Brum Viewpoial 



MoiuIjn. Julv ». 2(N)I ]?, 



HAYMOND 

From page 12 

such as forced intercourse But the 
validity of other reasons is a little 
more diuiblful. such as the fear that 
the child will be disadvantaged tor 
life 

While It IS true that the attitude 
toward sex used to be highly 
oppressive and extremely unin- 
formed. It seems that today s atti- 
tude has swung to the opposite 
direction, toward a loss of account- 
ability and responsibility 

Today, relationships have 
become vehicles for people lo go 
from one conquest to another Now 
the challenge is trying lo finding 
the biggest sexual organ, the most 
outrageous orgasm and the longest 
high 

Many people even take "test dri- 
ves" to see if someone is fit lo 
spend their lives with: if the experi- 
ence does not suit the person, then 
another person is sought, with no 
regard t« the other's feelings. 

The college freshman, who was 
iM4easi somewhat controlled by the 
pressure of parents in high schtMil. 
suddenly receives uninhibited free- 
dom upon entrance into college 
Among these freedoms is the lure 
of sex whenever and however one 
can get it 

While many have been ingrained 
with values that er«>de somewhat 
slowly (it al M). others act as 
though they couldn t wait lo "bust 
out of morality jatl' and tling them- 
selves into enjoying sexual liberty 
without thinking of the conse- 
quences. 

Mind you. this is not saying that 
trx IS wrong in itself Sex is impor- 
tant for two reasons: priKreation 
and the binding of two lives inio 
one If students follow these rea- 
sons for having sex. they can ensure 
responsible rclationship> and lov- 
ing lamiiics 

However, if students are not 
ready to start a family and/or enter 
into an intimate. la.sling relation- 
ship, then sex is merely for the sake 
of pleasure The results of this irre- 
sponsibility can have disastrous 
results for all involved. 

Rather than waiting until con- 
ception lo decide one s luture. ihe 
discussion and choice should be 
made prior u> committing the act 
that can conceivably decide our 
destiny 

Before sex. choices exist but 
after intercourse, the emotioiual 
stake narrow the choice 

Better lo make that choice volun- 
tarily before being forced into it by 
the presence of a growing life that - 
regardless of whether it lives or is 
aborted - will always contain a part 
of both creators. 



HANSEN 

FrtHnpagell 

istraiion exempt California from 
using gasoline additives lo reduce 
m pollution 

Bush IS not the supreme nemesis 
of Ihe environment as Ihe 
Democrats would have you believe 
His .sensible policy accepts that you 
can't have your cake and eat it kh) 
Apparently, many Americans 
chiH>se not lo understand this ctMO- 
cept of give and take when it comes 
lo Bush's environmental policies 

We like lo say that we would sac- 
rifice Ihe economy in favor of the 
environment, as 5h perceni ol 
Americans stated in an April M) 
LA Times poH Who arc we I«k»I- 
ing'* 

When the time comes lo chtnwe 
between siiving the coastal sage 
scrub and siivtng your job I have a 
strong suspicion that 5K percent ol 
Americans would not risk their jobs 
in an amaxing show o{ prt>-scruh 
support 




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"For the Birds" is a feature animation film in the "Spike and Mike's 
Festival of Animation" showing at Santa Monica's Laemmle's 4-Plex. 

'Spike and Mike' reveal 
dever animatkni shorts 



FILM: Festival showcases 
(Teativih. progression in 
boundless pen re, humor 



Bydvis' 
Daily Brum Staff 

Since Its humble beginning> ah a 
>crieN i>t scrL•t■nlng^ in a ct>mmunal 
liippif house Spikc and Mikes 
Hestiva! o) Animation ' has brought 
a new pcrspectne to a film medium 
that uas once considered whole- 
some tamiK tare 

Spike and Mike s ("lassie 
festival ol Animation" presents a 
^>(>-minuie collection ol 15 animated 
short films Irom Id countries The 
films are the winners ol a ycarlv 
contest b\ C raig "Spike'" Decker 
and Mike dribble, the testnal 
screens in about 5(1 cities in the 
I S and Canada, including Santa 
Monica s Laemmic s 4-Ple)i from 

juK Mo i: 

What Sundance is to indepen- 
dent film. Spike and Mike are to 
animation said writer'filmmaker 
\ick Rheinwald 

Over the last decade, the content 
and public perception ol animation 
has changed 

■ The Simpsons and ■St>uth 
I'ark have made animation a lot 
more attractive to teenagers and 
voung adults." Rheinwald said 

Belore The Simpsons, animation 
was virtualK ail Disnev When pciv 
pic see that animation no longer 
caters to just tamily viewing, they re 
more receptive lo watching some- 
thing like Spike and Mike "' 

Vlanv lamous animated TN 
series got their first public viewing 
ai the festivals, including "South 
Park ' Beavis and Butthead." 
Tov^erpufi tiirK and Rugrats 

Ihc ollerings in Spike and 
Miko use :i \anclv ol animation 
lorni.iN siich .IS computer, cell, pup- 
pet M) models w.iiercolor and col- 
"led pencil 

We ve been first on the block to 

tmd and premiere the best talent in 

animation since l*J'^7." Decker said 

Right ni>w Its the only show of its 

kind in the world ' 

Decker said the criteria lor the 
lesinals winners include humor 
accessibility to the appropriate 
audience and the story itself 

Some arc sweet charming and 
lamily oriented, others arc sick and 
twisted, rank and disgusting stun." 
Decker said 



He and a small stalTlook at 
approximately 1,000 titles every 
year, and Decker receives submis- 
sions year round 

"I'll gu to Sundance, or walk 
down the street and people give me 
their work." Decker said "ive had 
people walk up to me in restaurants 
and hand me tapes " 

Even though the winning entries 
all use humor to get their message 
across, the format and cost of each 
film vanes greatly 

One short. Don Hcrl/feldt s 
■ Rejected. " uses simple line draw- 
ings by a single artist, while Pixar. 
the company that created "Toy 
Story." utili/es complex computer 
animation m "For the Birds." an 
Oscar nominee for Best Animated 
Short Kilm in 2000 

"Father and Daughter. " winner 
ol the 2(K)0 Academy Award for 
Best Animated Short Film, is also 
featured in the festival This animat- 
ed short uses hand-drawn pictures 
that Decker said required "melicu- 
lous work and painstaking dedica- 
tion "' 

"For the Birds" is very charm- 
ing, funny and the timing is very 
good I think "Rejected " is very 
clever and hilarious There s just so 
much talent and creativity packed 
into those 90 minutes." Decker 
said 

We have pretty high standards." 
Decker said "Its hard to get really 
got>d films. Its like l(H>king for gold 

you have to sift through tons of 
sand to get a few nuggets " 

Spike and Mikes ■Classic" and 
'Sick and Twisted" festivals of ani- 
mation had an appropriate origin 
for the scries eclectic and zany 
images 

Decker and Ciribble lived in a 
communal house in Riverside. 
C ahf in the I97()s 

It was a communal animal- 
house type place, with parties all 
the time getting raided by the 
police, all kinds of good stuff." 
Decker said "We called it Mellow 
Manor" and it was a spillover of the 
hippie period "" 

While living at their "Mellow 
Manor." the two often held themed 
movie nights and along with the 
movies, they would show animated 
film shorts 

Fventually the demand rose 
more for the shorts than the movies 
themselves So Decker and Ciribble 
began lo promole shorts full-time 




The opening of a Salvador Dali exhibit will 
raise funds for the UCLA Medical Center 



"Stillness of Time" is one of several works by Salvador Dali on display in UCLA's Ackemian 
Grand Ballroom starting July 14. This is the largest exhibit of Dali works ever shown in L.A. 




The painting "Metamorphose" by Satv«dor Dali is among those on display on campus. 



Saturday evening will be filled with firsts, as the 
worlds of art. science and education converge in 
Ackermnn Grand Ballrw^m 

"A Surreal Soiree." a fund-raising reception for the 
UCLA Medical Center which opens an exhibit of 
approximately 650 works by Spanish mixlern artist 
Siilvador Dali. constitutes the first time a collection this 
large has been shown in Southern C'ahrornia. and is the 
first lunjj-raiscr of this type for the Medical Center 

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of both open- 
ing night tickets and some artwork will benefit pediatric 
geneiK research at Mattel Childrens Hospital at 
UCLA 

"It is a very worthy cause It's 
a myth that all our funding 
comes from the state We appre- 
ciate all the help we can get," 
said Dr Stephen Cederbaum. 
head of pediatric research at the 
hospital 

He and his team of specialists 
conduct research on the cause 
and treatment of genetic dis- 
eases in chiklren 

The two-week exhibition and 
sale will kick ofl with an opening 
night gala that benefits their 
research team A buffet dinner 
will be provided for attendees as 
they mingle among the 500 
works available for sale The 
asking price for the works 
ranges from $7,500 lo more than 
$250.(KK) 

Although Dali is best known 
for his surrealist work, the 
exhibit will not be restricted to 
paintings in that genre Other 
styles and media are <ilso includ- 
ed 

"He was more than just a sur- 
realist '" said Bruce Hochman. 
director of the Salvador Dali 
Gallery in J*acific Palisades 
Featuring the artists efforts in 



artistic genres beyond surrealism, the event presents 
him in a broader context 

"He could do anything. " H(K-hman said "Some of 
his other (non-«urreali.st) work holds the most meaning 
lor me " 

With sculptures, prints, etchings and murals on dis- 
play. HiK'hman hopes this exhibit will intr<xlucc more 
of the public lo the talent and craft of the Spani.sh artist. 

The unique event is the brainchild of private fund- 
raiser Tern Mandell 

Mandell's original concept was for an art exhibit 
held in Ackerman. featuring a collection from the 
gallery at which she works, withiiut the fundraising 
aspect When informed that all events held at UCLA 
facilities must be assinriated with the university, she said 
she saw the upportimity to transform her idea for a 
gallerv sh«>wmg into a beneni for the childrens hospi- 
tal 

"My son receives treatment at the medical center" 
she said Her son suflers from a terminal illness called 
Melachronatic Leukodystrophy 

This intimate association with Mattel Childrens 
Hospital at LICLA inspired Mandell to approach the 
University with the unique proposition lor a combina-. 
tion fund-raiser and art exhibit 

Capitalizing on her relationship with the gallery and 
the Medical Center, she mobilized these resources in an 
effort to enhance the available care for children and 
families facing the devastating challenge of childhtxxl 
disease 

Cederbaum said he was excited to learn of Mandells 
eflbrts and would be grateful to see the exhibition 
become a bi-annual event 

With the Medical C enter recently converting Irom a 
slate-suppi>rted to a stale-assisted institution, funding 
has been scarce State funding accounts for only ?() per- 
cent of the Children s Hospital s budget and the contri- 
butions <il private donors are significant in the hospn 
tal's ability to continue in its field of study 

■"PedwtrK. research is dependent upon the value soci- 
ety gives lo it." Cederbaum said "Doctors, just like 
artists, require patronage " 

ART: 'A Suncai Soifce' talies place July 14 m AckernMn 
GwkJ BaHroom Tickets for tf>e event are $100 For the rest 
of the exhibits run, gerwral admission is $7 tmd student 
•dmnsion is $4. For more information caN (310) S2S-2101 
or order tickets c w M m at vvww.ticl(ets.ucia.edu. 



J 



(.mnL' platinum 



(iht'ck out .\4tt next wrek for 
tht* skinny on "|,t*f;all> 
Blondf," starring bombshell 
Hcfsc \\ithrrs|K)on. 

Monday, JuK H, 2(M»1 



15 



'Dragon' follows formula 
for action movie success 



Fight sequences, 
musical score make up 
for lackluster storyline 



By 

Daily Bruin Contributor 



-:j' 



The formula for great aclion- 
movies usually includes a guy from a 
foreign country being framed lor 
something he didn't do, uith the 
catch that the foreigner is a cop 
crime busting and gotnl hearted The 
new action thriller. "Kiss of ttie 
Dragtin " follows this recipe succesv 
fully 

But the formula is lacking some- 
thing which "Kiss of the Dragon" 
picks up It attaches producer Luc 
Bevson. whi> established a loyal fan 
base with his direction of the "The 
Fifth , Flemenl" and 'rhc 
Professional ' and throws in martial 
arts superstar Jet Li ("Romeo Must 
Die'"), creating the blockbuster 
which opened 

July 6 at theaters ^^^^^^^^^ 
nationwide 

Li, a seasoned 
film star, has 
been dazzling 
fans for years 
with his tremen- 
dous skill in 
Wushu. an 

ancient Chinese ■ 

martial art 

Therefore it comes as no surprise 
that newcomer Chris Nahon accept- 
ed Lis initial vision of "Kiss of the 
Dragon" and decided to help direct 
the film 

The movie lakes place in Pans, 
where Liu Jiuan (Li). China's top 
government agent, is on a top-secret 
mission The trouble begins when he 
has lo assist Richard (TchF.ky 
Karyo). a corrupt police otTicial. with 
the aforementioned mission Little 
diKs Liu know, he is being set up and 
abruptly descends down a spiral of 
chaos. 

Framed for murder. Liu runs into 
Jessica (Bridget Fonda). an 
American woman who serves as a 
prostitute in this foreign country 
She. of course, is kind and was forced 
into prostitution agamst her will The 
twi) find they have one thing in com- 
mon all they have is each other 
Following their introduction. Liu 
priKeeds to do some serious ass-kick- 
ing 

Though the plot is not brilliant. Us 



shortcomings are redeemed by the 
action sequences Jet Lis martial art 
choreography is remitiisccnt of the 
popular fighting style cmpli>yed in 
Jackie Chun flicks, making use ol <my 
prop available and fighting like 
Iheres no tomorrow Jet Li s fight 
scenes, however, are more yrwMii 
than most Chan .sequences. 

Though not quite as impressive us 
fight scenes in Lis older Hong Kong 
movies, the action sequences do 
seem a bit better than those in Li s 
recent film. "Romeo Must Die "" 
Most stunts have no string assistance 
and do not indicaie much computer 
rendering Keanu Reeves would be 
put lo shame 

The dialogue is straightforward 
with several one-liners - typical script 
for action movies TchFky Karyo 
does an excellent job a.s a villain and 
his impassioned notoriety dominates 
his scenes Lis lines, although short 
and concise are certainly better than 
his single line, "If you were m Hong 
Kong, jNiiii would be dead." in 
''--■ "Lethal Weapon 



The plot's 
shortcomings are 
redeemed by the 
action sequences. 



Fonda d(K"s a 
decent job as a 
prostitute and 
contributes 
some emotional 
scenes, a relief 
from the anger 
and seriousness 

in the rest of the 

movie 

A definite 
commendation is also deserved lor 
the musicul score Composed by 
Craig Armstrong ("Romeo ^ Juliet." 
"Cioldeneyc" ), the entire score is fan- 
tastic "The music is a crucial part of 
the film and contributes considerably 
to every scene The tense portions are 
extraordinarily so and the music even 
helps to promote the lukewarm rela- 
tionship displayed by Li and Fonda 
on .screen 

Though lacking in some aspects. 
"Kiss ol the Dragon" is a giHxi action 
movie The one hour and 50 minutes 
pass by at a comfortable pace and 
viewers arc kept adequately enter- 
tained Amidst the heroism, gun-tot- 
ing fight scenes and blm)d and gore. 
It IS rather impressive to see a man a 
loot shorter than everyone el.se in the 
film beating up 15 black belts 

If anything, it gives every<»ne a bit 
of hope that they Uw could bail them- 
selves and a prostitute out of trouble 
in the event that they are framed for 
murder while visiting a foreign coun- 
try 





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As Liu Jiuan, J«t U lays ck>wn the law agairrst two thugs '\t\ "Kiss of 
the Dragof) " 



,.jft'. ;:._'&! M ;;;^ 



IH Vl«>ndj\ luK 9. 2(K>I 



Dullv Brum Arts & Eatertainmrnt 




Sound Bites J" 



Daily Brum Artk it EaterUunnMMit 



Vl(*!id<iy. July 9. 2(M)I |7 



MUSIC FROM THE MOTION PiaURE 

"A.I." 

Composed by John Williams 

John Williams 

"Music From the Motion Picture 

A.I." 

Warner Sunset/Warner Bros. 

John Williams i.s the master of the 
lllm scurc Krom "Star Wars' to 

Indiana Jones" to "Jurassic Park" 
his mosie themes are arguabK 
amony the most rctogni/ed in the 
business 

While not nearK so eas\ to hum 
as. sa\. the Star Wars' theme, the 
score Williams composed lor "A \' is 
nonetheless strilcing m its onginalit) 
and i>llen poignant exquisiteness 

Rather than hovering m nK)re 
laniiliar iriumphant tones the score 
lurks in darker corners Ihe highK 
puhhti/cd SlanlcN Kubrick connei- 
iiKii lo the moMc lingers in the nuisic. 
winch h.is .iN much ol a kuhnck Ice! 
,iv itv \ i>u.il ciiunlcrpari 



I he cost ol the K-ubnck element is 
thai the overall impression lelt by the 
store IS one ol coldness In the film 
this tactor ma> enhance the script s 
message, but in the soundtrack it 
casts a somewhat gUK)my mtHni 

I he quiet, haunting beauty ol 
"Stored Memories and Monica s 
Theme." complete with its faint 
choral element, is a perfect example 
Delicate, sad and never heavy-hand- 
ed, this IS an excellent expression of a 
scene s mcMKl Unlortunalely. the 
mood isn't one many want to experi- 
ence as they drive to work 

Where Dreams Arc Born." has 
the more upiilting quality usually 
as.scK'iated with both Wilhams music 
and Spielbergs films An operatic 
thread adds to the sense of strength 
in the track 

Also to Us credit and unlike manv 
other soundtracks. "A I ' dtK'sn't 
make the comnu)n mistake of repeal- 
ing one catchv musical phrase until 
the listener is bored to tears Rather. 
Williams incorporates variety, as 
when he adds electronic elements in 
I ybertronics or the singing talent 
ol Lara I abum in hor Always 

In spite of the immense quality ol 
this work. It doesn I stand alone from 
the film as v^ell as man\ ul the com- 



poser s other scores 

Williams has indeed produced a 
work of technical mastery and emiv 
tionai melancholy one that is emi- 
nently appropriate m the film for 
which It was written, but less so m an 
ordinarv setting 

Mary WUiiams 
Rating:? 

Staind 

'Break The Cycle" 

Flip Records 

Passion IS an element missing m 
much of today's corporate rcKk. but 
an ingredient that defines the music 
of the hard rock band Staind In the 
band's sophomore album. "Break 
The Cycle," lead singer Aaron Lewis 
delivers a moving performance that 
allows iLsteners to connect with both 
his emotion and pain 

On Ihe popular songs "Outside" 
and "It's Been Awhile." Lewis 
sounds like he is literally ripping his 
heart out for the li.stener 

It IS this type of vulnerubihty that 
lends Itself to the p*>wer of Staind s 
inlrospeetive music "Break The 
Cycle IS only the group s second 
album Still. Staind shows great 
maturity, which made a name for 



ilsell several years ago with its hit 
song "Mudsht>vel " 

Intense melody lines placed over 
the erupting music, as in the opening 
song "Open Your fcyes." will please 
both fans of hard edge music and . 
those of shrewd lyrics and melody ft 
IS this type of dichotomy that sepa- 
rates Staind from similar bands 

Another highlight of the album is 
the pulsing bass and soaring melody 
of "Fade. '" which shows that "Break 
The Cycle" is not tmly about its two 
radio hits, it features other songs thiU 
are just as potent and powerful 

A more severe song. "Can't 
Believe" presents the distorted vtKals 
and screaming side of Staind. which 
are much less prevalent on this CD 
than on its debut album The sparing 
use of screams makes them an effec- 
tive tool when unleashed on 'Can't 
Believe " The following song. 
"F.piphany." contrasts beautifully 
with Its slow pace and vcxals. pre> 
senting a gloomy yet uplifting sound- 
scape This uplifting power in Lewis 
pain-fillcd delivery is a key attraction 
for listeners 

He reali/es the connection that 
fans can feel with his music, as evi- 
dent in his "Thank You" on the last 
page of the b«M>klet insert It reads. 



io the fans i really cant express 
how much you mean to me You 
have ail made me realize that I am 
not the (miy tme wht) feels the way I 
do. and for that I thank you " 

And for that Lewis, listeners thank 
youas welL. ,, 

Chris Moriates 
■■■•V,'v;":: RatirtgrS 

Various Artists 

'lUiiChin' But A GangsU Party 2' 

Priority Records 

Well, the name says it all 
"Nuthin' But A Gangsta Party 2" it 
one of those CDs that should be 
advertised on TV with an old school 
supped-up car bouncing down the 
street, while a list of white and yellow 
song titles run up the screen The 
album, released by Priority Records, 
brings together classic rap from the 
early '90s Dr Dre era with brand 





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WOULD YOU LIKE TO WIN WOWetl ...™. t , 

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WILL BE INTERVIEWING AT UCLA } : 
FOR ITS ANNUAL COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP!'! C' 

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• Campus Events - 23id 
RonMHtic Dance Lessons 
Smsm Ackerman Union 
MR from 9 to 10 p.m. for 
more info rnit 

vvww.studentgroups.ucla.edu 
/ballroomdance/IFDChtml or 
caU (310) 284-3636 



16 



• Campus Events 23f«J 
RomantK Dance Lessons 
Sefies in Adierman Umon 
2406fnNn9to10p.m For 
IMN info, visit 

www.studentqroaps.iiclB.edu 
/ballroomdaiKe/IFDC.htmt or 
can (310) 284 3636 



* Campus Events Hammer 
Museum Films piesents 
"Avant-Garde Film Rarities" at 
the UCLA Hammer Museum 



17 



•Musk Chris Whiller 
performs at the RoHy Theatre 
at 8 p.m. For mfo. 90 to 
www.ticlietinaster.com 



• Campus Events Films of 
James Wong Howe, with 
special guest iolw . 
Frankenhetmer. showatltie 
James Brirlges TtiMtef m 
MHnitz 



• Campus Events Films of 
James Wong Howe show in 
the James Bndges Theater m 
Melnitz 



Campus Events Salvador Dali 
exhibition (approximately 6S0 
works by Dali will be on display 
in Ackennan Grand Ballroom 
until July 27) to benefit 
pedialnc genetic research at the 
UCLA School of Medicine 

* Qwptc twits - Owlle Vktor fiomea a Iwe perfenn 

1te|0WM LMelMMer it t ^.For iNiiLfo ID wMw.perfomiin9arts.«da.id^ 



• Campus Events Hammer 

Museum Jazz Concerts 

features the John Pisano Tno 

plus guest ieannie Pisano at 

the UCLA Hammer Museum 



• Musk Girls Night Out with 
Reba McEntire and Martina 
McBride takes place at 7 p m 
at the Staples Center For 
more info goto 
www ticketmaster.com 



II 



*9ldsit -'fBsslii^'wrjons 
performs at the Roiiy Theatre 
at 8 p.m. For mfo. 90 to 
www.ticketinaster.com 
• FHm "JurassK Park III' 
opens m theaters nationwide 



19 



• Music Inner Circle performs 
with Ky-Mani Mariey at the 
Ro«y Theatre at 8 p.m. For 
mfo. go to 
www ticketmastercom 



"Theater Michael Flatley s 
"Feet of Flames shows at the 
Staples Center at 8 p.m. For 
info, go to 
www ticfcetmastef com 



21 



* Music Vbotfoo Gtowskufls 
Wann-Beretta perform at the 
Troubadour at 8 pm. For info 
go to www.tKketmastercom 
■ Music Kali performs at the 
Key Club at 7 20 p.m for mfo 
90 to www.ticketmaster.com 



22 




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Ddiiy Bruin Arts 4 Ent^rtainmeat 



LOYOLA MARYMOUNT 

II Ml ¥ £ R S I T Y 

ExpkMv your gradiuite studies at LMU 



You can still apply to one of our Rolling Admissions Programs for Fall 200 J. 

Apply HOW before classes are filled. 

Business Administration 

Eight emphases and an International 
Certificate Program 

Science/Engineering 

Civil. Electrical. Environmental. Mechanical. 
Computer Science and Production Management 

Education 

Teacher Education. Human Services and Specialized Program 
( 15 certificate and credential programs) 

Theology and Pastoral Studies 



For more infortnatian cantsct: 

Graduate Admissions Offices. Lc^ola Marymount Univers^ 

7900 Loyola Blvd.. Los Angeles, CA 90045-8322 

TEL (310) 338 2721 FAX (310) 338-6066 

Web sit e: w>Arw.hnu.edu/graduate 

email: gradapps#*lmu.edM 



UCLA 2001- 



Every AAondoy 



Your source for 

news and 
information 




Ad info (310) 825-2161 

Echronol into (310) 82^9696 
ex drop by 11 6 Kefd^hoff Hdl 




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TAX INCLUDED 

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Coupon must b* giw«n to dnw«r 
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No 1/2 and 1/3 



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ANIMATION 

From page 14 

The first "Spike and Mike 
F-eslival o( Animation" was in 1977. 
a 90-minutc collection ol shorts, 
essential!) creating a leature The 
teslival got bigger and bigger. 

In 1990 they created "Spike und 
Mikes Sick and Twisted Festival of 
Animation" tu showcase the films 
that were too inappropriate or 
immoral for the regular festival but 
were still the best in their genre. 
This year "Sick and Twisted" 
screened from March through iVUiy. 

From the start. "Spike and 
Mike" struggled to continue cacti 
year 

"We did crazy stuff on the street, 
Kke in the Haight-Ashbury district 
to promote the festival." Decker 
said. "I would wear a cowboy out- 
fit, get 50 to 100 battery-p<>wered 
toy cows with flyers on them like 
sandwich boards, herd them to 
Union Square " 

The festivals get advertising 
from color brochures, small ads in 
newspapers and word-of-mouth 

"We do exceptionally well with 
our attendance in proportion lo the 
advertising budget we have and in 
comparison to other films in the 
industry." Decker said. 

The popularity o^ "Spike and 
Mike" has drawn attention to the 
progression and quality of anima- 
tion being made 

° A>< u whole the festival is a good 
>.implinp of what creative ideas are 
out there in animation." Rhcinwald 
said "It shows you a lot of giKxl 
talent out there Who knows where 
these people will go you might 
end up seeing some of this stutY on 
TV. like what happened to 'South 
Park." 



'Spike and Mike's 
Classic Festival of Animation' screens 
at Laemmle's 4-Plex in Santa Monica 
until July 12. Call (310) 394-9741 for 
information. ' . ;. 



SOUNDBITES 

From page 1# 

new music from artists soctl as 
Kurupt. all on one disc 

The first two songs give the listen- 
er ii definite idea ol what the rest of 
the album will be like, as the 199.^ 
Death Row hit Who am I (What's 
My Name)" by Snoop Doggy Dogg 
IS followed by the lesser known 2000 
addition "Sntxip Dogg ( Whals My 
Name Pi 2) " 

The approximately 75-minule . 
long album relies on old time 
favorites to help bring attention to 
ne\A S4)ngs Interestingly, unlike the 
classics, the newer songs are mostly 
on the Priority Records label, giving 
the impression that the older hits are 
simply placed on the CD in order to 
sell listeners on the new songs 

The track listing is u veritable 
who's who list in the "gangsta rap" 
circuit, featuring songs by Ice Cube, 
Mack 10. Silkk the Shixker. C 
Murder. Nate Dogg. Dr Dre. Snoop 
Dogg. Kurupt. Eastsidaz. Roscoe 
and more 

The remarkable thing is the way 
that songs such as Kurupt s "Who 
Ride Wit lis' released in 1999. fits m 
perfectly with songs such as the orig- 
inal "Nuthin But A 'G' Thang." 
released in 1992 

Nuthin But A Ciangsta Party 2" 
delivers a solid mix of West C'oast 
hip-hop music, accomplishing its 
purpose ot providing an cflective 
party s<iundtrack The hard edged 
tunes conjure up images ot the early 
'9<)s-stylc gold chains, hydraulic cars 
and 40 oz beers Although the com- 
pilation merely regurgitates moatly 
overplayed rap tunes, it is a wet^ 
organized asaembiy of 19 songs to 
party wiHt 



Daily Bruin 



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■ Awotd atlbreviations niake you> 
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source lor mtHm m . taouNy t 
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Foreign Language 



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science Creative ACUvHies Flevtite hours 
Competitive ralaa High schooi-graduale 
school. MCAT naaaa can 310-573-22M 



MATH TUTOR 

t tutor SAT math. Pre-Algabra Algabra 1 and 
2. Geontetry. Tngonomeify. and begmnmg 
Cateulus UCLA Student math-related 
maior Five yea's expenance tulormg math 
and two yean iHCtMng experience 
$25/hour at my hanw tSOffwur at yours Call 
lor more intormation Ot aph a me 310-702- 
6455 

WRTTING TUTOR 

HARVARD GRAD literature PHO studaiik 



hoo.com 

WRITING TUTOR 

KIND AND PATIENT Stanford graduate 
Halp «Mh •» EngMti liwtygi tor stud- 
ams at all agaaAenalB 9KM40-3iie 



7100 

TLitorinQ UV'.'in'oc: 




EARN »SOO-70(VWK wNhai 

a dipaa. Qtaa Foreign 

biMi. Spend iShrs./wk 

One or T««o waakeMmOi Andy 714-: 

ono 

TUTOR WMNTED lor Ireahman level higri 
•ohool in English and Malh Teaching «Mdt« 
Upto$2aAir Ca« 310-823-6091 



TLACHTHE SATs! 



Need energetic people with 

High SAT scores to prep 
students 1 -on-l or in classes 
All regions $]S-$2S/hr Flex 
hours Car needed Call Tom 

310-44S-1744 
w^rw.mtoriobs.cofii 



7200 



WORD PROCESSING speaaluing in thes 
es dissenations tranacnplion legal psych, 
resumes lliers broct»u»ea. mai kn g Ms re- 
ports 310-82B-6939 




7500 

Career Opportimifips 



BARTENDERS 



• n-s not a !■» -M > ■ mwty"' | 



1 (800) B4f> • IVIIXX (f>4f»<*> 



^ Imagine ^ 






S680 



5680 



T I lyj**: n*.^! 



T r : I v*.' : ^^^ 




TRAVEL 



7600 

Child Carv Off«'red 



THE BABYSITTERS 
CLUB 

on-caM sMer service to parents 
310-226 



7700 

Child Care Wantec 



EXPERCNCED BABYSITTER lor 5 and 9 
AM Saturday evening and 
Musi twve local rei 
erences Non-smoker Female preferred 
310-418-6413 

F/T NANNY NEEDED lor 3 kids 2. 4 and 6 
aid ChM care OMpenence. car and 
reierer>ces required Close to 
UCLA Otane 310-264-6853 

MOTHERS HELPER FOR 2 CHH.OREN 
Light houaalNapaig and cooking Monday- 
Fnday lpm-6pm $10/hr Car i 
aaraquired Near UCLA 310-2 



ptchiux:are 

For Very special 6yr oM daughter Inter 
natmrtal or bWngual background pre- 
lerrad. carAraldMnaaa raqmrad Grand 
Piano Bevertywoad Laird 3 10-287 

1677 I 



7800 

Heir lA/.iM-tr1 



BANKING 

P/T laHer/naw accounts positions at Umvers 
rty Credit Umon Excellent pay. twurs & envi- 
rorwnent Some expenerKe prelerred Apply 
at 1500 S Sapulveda BNd . LA 90025 Fax 
resume 310-477 2566 or on wet) 
www ucu org/|abs htm 

cafe/brentwood 

GOOD$$ 

FlextMe hours Great aimoaphere Bnght 
energetic friendly people wanted 
PT/FT/Weekend positions available tor 
mgmt. counter, and bansta positions 12081 
Wiishire Blvd. Brentwood Apply today 

CHILDREN'S STORE 

HELP WANTED Near Westside pavilion 
Pr\ $8/hr 310-204 1696 

CLERK TYPIST/ 

RECEPTIONIST Martage small medical re 
search group Good communication/wming 
skills, word-proceaamg. Windows 95 up to 
20tK>urs/wk weekday-mornings Starting 
SeOO^r Westwood 310-826-0679 

CLERK/PHONE RECEPTIONIST lor an m- 
tenor design co M-F(9em'ipm) Knowl- 
edge ol qwckbooks t>elplul Fax resume 
816-591 7057 



7800 



COMPUTER RESEARCHER/ADMIN AS 
SISTANT PT 24hrs./wk or lull time Student 
with flexible twurstprelere graO student o' re 
cent grad I Capable or researcrvng ditlerent 
types ol accounting software lor purchase 
Help with insttlalion and data input PC/MS 
savy. Detail oriented Self Slartei Able to 
worV with little supervision Type 50-60-> 
words per minute Good communication 
skills Please send hours ol availability dui 
ring summer arxl sctKWl year Help Re 
search ana purctiase accounting/time man 
agement soltware for profeci nnanagenient 
along with general office duteis tor small 
WesI LA architecture firm $10 iVhr DOE 
Fax resume to 310 286-2301 No phone 
caNs 

DRIVING INSTRUCTOR 

WANTED Full-time oi pan-lime Wesiwood 
dnving and traffic sctiool CaN tor mforma 
Hon 310-206-3333 

FEMALE FKaURE 

Of iile drawing models wanted t>y photogra 
pher Call Paler at 310-556-4221 

GREAT KIDS 

MOTHERS HELPER tor toddlef and new 
tx>m 3mo 15-20 tHxirs/week Flexible Posi 
five loving and patient adult Spanish oi 
FrefKhaplus $6 to shan 310-312-6022 

GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR A SALES 
PERSON The r>ew YMLA Flagship store at 
the beverly center to be open in late July 
2001 Appkcartls must be a self starter hon 
est. reliat)ie aiid anioys all kinds of people 
this IS a great opportunity lor someone to 
work at an INC 500 corporation and t>e a pan 
of the growing family II interested piaaae 
contact Sam Destro at 323 222-9900 eat 
314 or e-mail sam at samOymla com. 

HIGH ENERGY! 

Customer Service Great with people'' En- 
ergetic dependable Want a fun at- 
moaphare with great SS Fax Resume 310- 
445-060 

HOUSEKEEPER/HOME OFFICE ASSIS 
TANT lor tiusy doctor Weekends Laun 
dry/cleaning . assist w/cooking etc No skills 
required Great pay' Flexible sctieduie 
Leave message 310-967-5180 

IMMEDIATE OPENING 

WEST SIDE Law Firm seeks PT recaption 
ist Afternoons Ptwne-fassist as needed 
Outgoing personality Previous expenerv:e a 
plus 818 786-4366 

JOBS, JOBS, JOBS 

Cuatomer service administrative assistant, 
legal secretary and nwinagement position 
Fax resumes to Nexoption* 323 735 5840 

LAW FIRM SEEKING bnght and motivated 
individual lor pan-time receptionist poaMion 
Oppodumty for growth S6 10/hour Please 
contact 310-300-2300 

LEADERS WANTED 

SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEUR seeks 
like-mmded big thinkers* INTL opp 323-964 
5702 

LOOK CLOSELY 

Pn WORK FT PAY Bnght students wanted 
Culver City office Generous salary plus 
commission Good phone voice Gra- 
ham:31 0-837 -0505e«t 1 74 







Checkout 




the Ashe Center 




Women's 


I 


Clinic. 


Most routine services are fra*. 




It's absolutely confidential 


i 


It's riot just for illness - vi^ether 


HHHi 


you're ready for intimacy (or 


^^r 


not), or |ust need to know 


1 


you're ok, the Women's Clinic 


■K 


has soinetfiing for yow. 

Wftotever is on yow mind 
about tfie miracle of being 
female feel free to call 
us, moke an appointment. 


NMM»,c«N 310 125-4073, or vtat 
iHe Aahe vweb site le re«|weat «m 




talk it over 




ucia Ashe Center 



THE BABYSITTERS CLUB needs babysit 
lets now Days, evenings and week-ends 
MuBt have aepwlance $i0^r 310-226^ 
2900 



7800 

Help Wanted 



unic{ue job opportunity 



$15-«2»MR BRIGHT. ENTHUSIASTIC peo 
pli to toach SAT prep ana ALL Academic 
Tranaponalion required We wm 
a»». Sand or tax cover let 

jdMBto«acofee(SAT GRE. 

ale.) to ACE Educational Semwes. Atin:Bar 
ly. Mil W PkX) Blvd. SlePH-K. LA CA 
mas. Fax 310-282-6424 Poaihons avail 
•Mt ttNDugfKHit LA and ttw vaNey 

S200-800/DAV FOR NUDE MODELING 
Women wanlad lor nude modeling. Pholo 
ContodChaaa 310-261-5216 or 



A PERFECT STUDENT 
JOB!!! 

AFTERt^OONS DURING SCHOOL FuMtime 
duiing Quarter BRaalB and Summer ¥Ka 
Morw! Wofk at •* moM tamoue tonraa shop 
m LA Wtodi aapedence rwt neoeaaary Mini- 
mum pay $7 50/hr "String tor ttie 
prosi'Wealwood Sporting Goods 1065 Gay 
lay Ave 3i0-2a6'62i5 




2pm to epm. M-F Contact 
310-44*^104 



ANYONE CAM 00 IMS 
school ac n edali 
Hma 6ie-751-7»51 



.ITIPOS 

222^ 



your 





ftefibte k^mrs 
mimimmt'time 
ewmmitement 



$$00 per menth 



If you're male, in good health, in 
college or have a college degree, and 
would like a flexible job where you can 
earn up to $600 per month AND set 
your own hours, call 310-824-9941 
for Information on our anonymous 
sperm donor program. Receive free 
health screening and help infertile 
couples realize their dream of 
becoming parents. 



TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD PUZZLE 



ACROSS 

1 Type of healer 
6 Take apart 
1 Coal deposit 

14 Midyyest 
inelropolis 

1 5 Kind of opera 

16 Ticklish Muppet 

1 7 Cream ctteese 
supporter'' 

18 Dianst Frank 

19 Plumbers 



DEVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVeO 



20 0aam) 
22 0ni 
23 

24 Wash and - 
26 Far East temple 
29 Potatoes — 

33 Iron and Space 

34 Pack animal 

36 Naiiad 

37 Sewing kit itetn 
36 Small ammo 

39 Robin Hood's 
yyaapon 

40 Baaaball family 



F 


rJa 


u 


D 




1 


D 


1 


O 


M 




BIO 


B 


B 


A 


L 


s 


A 


T 


e|m 


P 


O 


A C 


E 


1 


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E 


R 


C 


A 


p 


e 


D 


S T 


E 


caaoD n 


C 


1 


E 


R 


G 


A 


L 


L 


EIRIYHA 


c 


C 


EiNlT 


S 


A 


N 


O 


1 


nItWpir 


o 


u 


B 1 


M 


1 


NOISHM 


A 


K 


E 


M 


[IQ 


R 


Y 


U 


T 


E 




L 


u 


R 


1 


B S 


A 


U 


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A 


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A 


U 


L 


1 Inhcii 


V 


1 


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a 


A 


L 


LU 


D 


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A 


R 


MA 


DA 


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■age 


LE 


S 


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1 


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A 


P 


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1 


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1 


TE 


S 


Z 


g 


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D 


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A 


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n|c 


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76-01 



t 200'' untaa (=Mtur« Sypdcal* 



42 Plunders 

44 London s - Mall 

45 2000 or 2004 e g 
47 Elegant 

49 Car-wtieel lock 

50 Zoo bamer 

51 Squinel's tidbit 
54 Toss (cargo) 

overboard 

58 Gentle exercise 

59 Cattail e g 

61 Hun 

62 Actress 
Loughlm from 
■Full House" 

63 Jazzy 
Fitzgarald 

^9mm 



65 imitalad 

66 Window ledge 

67 Pool membar 



DOWN 

1 Watch cliains 

2 Asian nanny 

3 Otfiello s foe 

4 Coffee holder 

5 Paused 

6 Established 
practice 

7 — of tt>e above 

8 Aykroyd or 
Rather 

9 Ajar to a poet 

10 Old hand 

11 Vivacity 

12 Urchins 

1 3 Facial feature 

21 Fine horse 

22 Paving material 
24 Sauaaoa 
2STMp»o(trip'' 

26 C^ John Paul II 

27 Like gymnasts 

28 Columbus port 

29 Bower 

30 Band 
instruments 

31 Ma(ir>ee guys 



32 O'Brien from 
"Gunsmoke" 
35 WWH prowlar 

41 Scold 

42 August baby, 
maybe 

43 Native of 
Glasgow 

44 Dentists 
custon>er 

46 Not hither 

48 Shop machines 

50 Citation 

51 "The Clan of 
the Cave Bear" 
heroine 

52 Ry the - 

53 Gnmm bad guy 

54 Harden 

55 Glut 

56 Baker s need 

57 Orchid-loving 
detective Wolfe 

59 Home in the 
phone bk 

60 Whitney or 
Wallach 




Dispia' 
206-3r 



22 M<m<lj\. JiflN H, 2(K)1 



l)m\\ Brum Classified 



[)ail\ Brum CtassifiMi 



Monday. JuK <). 20()1 23 



7800 

HhIj, W,inIfTf 



7800 



7«00 



Weir lA/ . ■ 



8UOO 

Ap;irnii«Mitv t ,r i,, 



S^OO 

Apitrttncfits li»r K( 



We hmSUfflTnefm^om available. 

Looking for if% 

flexible houtw 

S 9«/ O per hour 



*(l(>nvemenl Scheduling 
(Mon -In t'vt'iiiiij's& Sal .Sun ) 
* Bui Id Your Resume 
■'Sfieak Directh to Alumni 
** We are an equal opportunitx employer 

( >al I Sandin for .^pp( )intmenl r^ 

310-794-OZn u 

l()S3(;avle\Ave.4th 
email callcenter@supportucla.edu 



MARBLE CARE CO Seeking TecnnKaans 

F T Positions Benefits Los Angeies Area 
Please Call Pie 757-00 1 3 

MEDICAL FRONT OFFICE poMion tor busy 

Beverly Hills Oermatoiogy practice Variety of 
(Juiies PT References required Call Oiane 

:i 10-273-0467 

MILLIONAIRE MINDED? 

Entrepreneur seeks two part time individudis 
to make $1997 in ttw neict two weeks Um 
Derto 1 866-4a309e3 

OFFICE MAlviAGER entry level will train 
lull lime MF 9-6 10 minules Irom UCLA 
Computer knowtedge required Salary/berte 
•it* f 10-476-4206 

PH" WRITER/ 
RESEARCHER 

Musi lav«? engineer -scierwe background 

S"iiouftor magazine 3i0-9i7 1120 

PART TIME CLERICAL ASSISTANTS Mom 
ng hours 8 i2 M TH Call Neil 8000-450 
"^ee- Beverty Hills 



Mrii VLivKn .liildirii all jierv va- 
1- I'' Kilim i.iHMMirfCul^ Mjiu/iin- 

. . ....^ ....; .... .11 .. . 



»;,// nitt-n uu 



310.659.7000 




PLAY GAMES AND EARN MONEY TOO' 
So(iai psyctioiogicai experiment 1 hour 
Avprage $1C Undergraduate only Can 310 
825 301" sign up 2524 Herstiey or email 
Dt)onacich#yanoo com leaving your name 
ptione number and available times 



RELAX & IMAGINE 

ResHrt"' siurlv especially seeking those 
*it'' panic oisorder/panic-anMiety attacks 
"ioi,qr not required Contact Chris Nikolai 
I1S P^ D Candidate chns«lu»ler edu 626 
SR4 5Mf^ 

RESEARCH 
ASSISTANTS 

"FRIENDLY AND DYNAMIC COMPANY 
-.eeks PT Researchers Flexible days and 
•lours Located near UCLA $9 I2'hr Bene 
'Its available tor 30»hours,wk Call 310-996- 

•■)7o- 0,1 133 

SANTA MONICA ATTORNEY is looking (or a 
FT'pT tile clerk and secretary Hours can be 
Mexibte Musi be able to type and spe«k 
some Spa^ls^ Please call Alita 310-452 
■44- 

5CUL PTOR SEEKING DRIVING COMPAN 
ION to Ann Arbor Michigan Leavir>g July 
•4l^^ Reluming by July 24t^ 818 866-9006 
'ssiynnCearthlink net 

SECRETARY 

' 2 time i mornings) 2RN at VA Medical Cen 
ter tMesi LA Prohcient ir Word and Excel 
S'l^our Some benefits Fax resume to Su 
,an Orranqe 31CV26B-4404 



SMOKERS IN GOOD HEALTH 18-45 want 
ed lor nicotir>e research study administered 
at Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles 
Healthcare System Participants will be paid 
up to $170 for lour visits Call Or Richard 
Olmstead at 310-478-3711. ext 8363V 
leave rnessage 

SPORTS COUNSELOR AND ASSISTANT 
TEACHER NEEDED School age day care 
center lull time summer emptoyment in Vkn 
Nuys Sports Crafts Trips. Boys Swimming 
etc Good Salary Lenny 818-894-0330 

STUDENT ASSISTANT $9 75/hr Work stu 
dy-eiigible Ger>erai office duties/assist in re 
search (coding/data entry) Great opportum 
ty to learn business research Details 
call 310-794-0422 



WORK WHENEVER, 
WHEREVER YOU WANT 

Outside sales, make SSSS selling cell 
phones to your Inands lamrty and cowork 
ers 310-444-0555 ext 248 



8100 



TEACH ENGLISH IN FUKUOKA JAPAN 
Stan Sepi One year CtuMren and adults 
Housing/bonus/airtare Degree needed Fax 
resume to 626-446-3614 

TEACH IN SOUTH 
KOREA 

English Language Teactiers Free airtsie 
tree fiousing. rnedicai insurance paid vaca- 
tion severance package No Korean neces- 
sary $1400 1500/month Send photo/re 
sume KoreaConnectCyahoo com BA/BS 
required Travel Asia' 

TWO POSITIONS LAW OFFICE ASSIS 
TANT ir Santa Monica PT NexiMe hours 
$10/hr PERSONAL OFFICE ASSISTANT m 
Pacific Palisades 20 mins from UCLA 15 
30hrs/wk flexible $i0/hr Tami 310-459- 
2087 

VIDAL SASSOON ACADEMY Model Call 
July 5th and I2th betvireen 6 7 pm 321 San 
ta Monica Bhrd We are looking lor fashion 
lonward girls wtio want to update or revive 
their look All Models must be open to a com- 
plete ctiange-Cut A Color Payment Oppoflu- 
niiies or tree services for 6-months Must be 
available July 21 22 For furttwr details call 
310-255-0011 ext 1 



Pf'rs,r)n;il A*,^iv' .-, , 



PERSONAL/ 
PROFESSK>NAL ASST 

Availat>le to help organize your Pusy iile Ad 
ministralive assistant personal assistant 
type work Adolf 310-876 1910 



8300 

Volunteer 



VOLUNTEER OPPOR- 
TUNITIES 

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED at Hostelling 
International in SM Meet and mleract w/lrav 
elers from all around the wortd* Call Lucy at 
310- 393-991 3 ext 18 



Luxu" Ajja^ment- ,f' "tt>«- Hea'-' 11' WifsTwixw'' 




WANTED PART TIME 
HOUSEKEEPER 

Light Housekeeping Cook dmner and 
•Otshes Monday Fnday 4 9pm Juty 30- 
Sept 4 145/diiy Karen Daytime 323-661- 
0330 Evening 310-657 1660 



84O0 

Apanments fut k»-rit 



1-MINUTE TO UCLA 

1 bdmn. lumMtMd clean secunty entrance 
iMf* OtOMIi, iMinctry room, pool lyr 
Sl20(ymo 310-624 I8X 



Classifieds 
825 2221 



IVesf LA. living at its best. 




Close 10 tfieatres, shops & restaurants 

# Beautiful arcfiiteclurai detaits througfiout 

# One & two bedroom apartment homes 

# Ne^ desigrter interiors 

# Gourmet kitchen 

# Built in appiiarKes >», V 

# State-of-the-art fitness eenUr 

# Roof-top sun deck & spa 

# ContfolJed access & gated parking 

# Exienwye Resident services 



Calt Today! 

(310)479^205 
10983 WeMworth Ave 
Los Angeles, CA 90024 

theplaza^rwsetby.com 



nI 




Summer THscaunts 

Single $950 $1045 
1 BD $1145 $1395 

2 BO $1645 
2 BD w/loft $201 5 



660 Veteran 
20S-2251 



1360 VETERAN Ibdrtn/lbth S139S<nag) 
Park view. rooMop paalf|Ku22i intercom en 
Iry gated paMig. iMMtry. all appliances 
Move-m ASAP Cats conwdered 310-477- 
5106 

1360 VETERAN -2t>dm)/2t>th $189S<neg) 
Park view, rooftop pool/|acuzzi intercom en 
try. gated parking, laundry all appliances 
Move-in ASAP Cats considered 310-477 
5106 

SMI EAST UCLA BACHELOR $585/month 
2t)ed/lbath S120Q/month Large and bright 
upper Evenings 310-858 7760 

BEVERLY HILLS ADJ 1&2BEDROOM 
$8964UP LARGE UNUSUAL CHARM 
SOME SPANISH STYLE WHARDWOOD 
FLOORS ONLY 1,'2 BLOCK TO PICO BUS 
310-839-6294 

BEVERLY HILLS ADJ Pico/Crescent 
Heights area 2bdrrTV2t](h Htm home Front 
and backyard ml lap ww pirden Wash 
er/dryer )^JC SI 795 DmM 323-936 1449 

BRENTWOOD 

NORTH OF WILSHIRE spacious 
3bdmV2blh. upper, w/ bakxxiy New dish 
NMMar. (aMgHMor, mdm etc Ouiet 8-unit 
bMV- ml gw*n aunaMk S2295 11921 
Goshen Awe •4 Open Sunday or by appt 
310-571-0293 

BRENTWOOD ADJ. 

2bdrTTV2bth S1490 Laaae to two No pets 
Near Wifshire/Bundy/LXJLA Bnght upper 
with Bakxxiy 1236 McCleUan Dr 310-826 
8461 



• • 



wr 



.ENROCK 



APARTMENTS 
GLENROCK 

AND 
LEVERING 

Single. 1&2 
Rrdroum Apartments 

|- 3 Blocks to Campus 

Kooftop Sundeck & 
Spa 

Fitness Room 

Study Lounge 

Laundry Facilities 

Gated Assigned 
Parking 

Individual alarm 
systems 

MliCH. MUCH MORE! 
RESERVE YOUR 

APARTMENT NOW! 
SUMMER 01 
FALL '01- 02 



^ 



Wfstw(X)d ViUd>^c 

43.^ Kt'lion Ave 
13 1 0» 2f MWViRS 

1 Bedroom from $1225 

2 Bedroom from $1700 

Extra large luxury units UKlude 

• Fully equipped kitctten 

• Central tteattng and air 

• Extra closet space 

• WettMr m selected units 

• Private tatoony 

• 2 Bdroms have 2 bPtfis 

• Intercom entry & gated parking 

wall 1 year Ivaae 
PreMManBr "wieM k* 
I ntr crated Propeny Scrvicr> Iik 



BREf^TWOOO $1700 2bd«)th. front, bal- 
cony, refrigerator/siove/dishwasher. car- 
pet/drapes, partnng. laundry, no paia. nwr 
UCLA by appt. 11728 MayfieMft 310-271- 
6611 

COZY 2 BEDROOM 1 b«h $1240 Brent 
Ad| Near Wllshire/freeway/UCLA 
to iwo No p«ts Patio 1333 Batry 

Avertue 310-626-6461 

FURNISHED STUDIO APT $625mK) de- 
posit $400 UtfNties included quiet 6 nwnlh 
mm 5 mil from campus Pool Lmde Alvai«t 
manager310-637 3SS6 

LARGE STUDIO/GARDEN GUESTHOUSE 

Mpwiy redone in baauMul raMM 
• .)' UCLA Perfect tor qvM. young I 

rial or grad student $1125 310-474- 
■ •• fS 310-273-9966 



L 



LEVERING ARMS 

Large Sunny 

Singles & 1 Bedroom 

Apartments 

Walk to School and Vina«r 

No Prts 

(310) 208-3215 

667-669 Levcnng Ave. 
Near Glcnrnck 



Uispiav 



8^00 

ApHrttttffits t'jr Rff)' 




NEAR UCLA Ibdmi wood floors newpaini 
1 year laaaa. $l0O(Vmonth 8 unit buikkng 
/mmtH naw* Betty 310-479-6646 

PALMS IBDRM/IBTH $925/mo tVewly 
painted gated parking, intercom, jacuzzi ii'2 
bhx* to UCLA bus Kay 310-642-9127 

PALMS Single apt from $600 l-bdrm $700 
S600/$700de(>osii i-year lease only-lasi 
month free Stove, retng .carpets ven 
MindE 310-637 1502 LM 8am Spm 

LOCATION N. OF 

WILSHIRE 

NEAR BEACH 

$1255 1 badroora Hardwood Moors Cttarm 
ng apM level. dMMmaatwr. refngerator 937 
Tih Slraal Cats OK 818 980-9903 

SANTA MONICA STUDIO S875 walk to 
market/l>u& street parking avaiiatxe 9/5 
Garage. $150/monfh avaMHe now. 1234 
14th Street 310-471-7073 

SANTA MONICA NORTH OF WILSHfRE 
Nice itxtrm. upper Stove fndge Large pa- 
tio Parking Great iocaiK>n Near Ocean 
SunrVy No pats $12S0m«o 323-462-0507 



UF 



GAYLEY MANOR 
APTS 

Larfte. Clean 
Singles A I BedrtHWis 

Across ttie Street from UCLA 

Walk to Village 

Near Le Conte 

No Pets 

729 Qaytey Ave. 

(310)208-8798 



JQ 



WESTWOOD PLAZA 

GREAT SUMMER 
DISCOUNT 



...... $525-S820 

Singles S750-S1 200 

1 Oedroom.. $1000-51200 



31 0-208-8505 



8UOO 

AfKirtfttf'tifs tfif Ht-<" 



Casablanca West 
Available NOW 

1 Bedrooms trom S1195 
Bachelors $795 



530 Veteran 
208-4394 



BRENT MANOR 
APTS 

Avoid West wood rents 
1 mile to UCLA 

Sinipte* 

1 &'2 Bedrooms 

Pool. Near bus line 

Nu pete 

1235 Federal Ave. 

Near Wilshirt- Blvd 

(510) ^77-7257. 



SPACKXJS. Amv.STUOtO Fun Kitctten 
Corr>e' ol SirathmoreA/eleran Close to 
Campus Express Rent $950/mo Wtater plus 
gated parkirtg induded ApNi20e Call 310- 
208 2251 ASAP 

WALK TO UCLA WESTWOOD 
IMnWIMh. aMnn/2t>tri Pool lacuz^i walk- 
ai etaaali. tMplBce luM-kitctien gated ga- 
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lowers com 310-206-1976 

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up Partung. stove refrigerator laundry 
room AvaHabte erxl of August Beautiful 
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Balcony Near campus 310-444 1478 

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Newly remodeled 2 bedroom 1 5 t)at^ unit 
niait><e and wood Uniahes Full kitchen and 
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t)um OuKk walk to UCLA 310-729-2433 
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Bedrooms One Bath Garage Stove 
Retngeraioi Hardwood floors Near UCLA 
Transponahon $1650 1365 Midvate 310 
454 8211 

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Small 1 t>drm $i075/rT>ontn AH utWties and 
one parking included Days 310-475-7533 
evenings 310-659-4834 

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LEVERING LARGE 1 AND 2-BDRM APT 
GARDEN VIEW DINING ROOM UNKXiE 
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room. $1400 10990 Sirattimore Fumisried 
ibdrm $1350 547 Landtair i year lease 
No pets Available Sept 310-471 7073 

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no partung i-t>adroom. $1400 3-cai park 
mg 10943 Roabimg. i -year lease no pets 
available July 310-471 7073 

WESTWOOD SPACIOUS ONE BEDROOM 
$i125up Dmnng area stove refndgeraloi 
2 Bedroom duptax $2000 Parking Laundry 
Walk UCLA 11095 Strathmore 310-454 
8211 

WESTWOOD 2BORM/2BATH $1450 AND 
UP TILE KITCHEN STEPDOWN LIVING 
ROOM HIGH CEILING CHARM 1 MILE 
SOUTH OF WILSHIRE SOME W/BAL 
CONY 310-839-6294 

WESTWOOD WaMi to UCLA 2bdrnV2blh 
gated parking, rooltop spa quiei txjilding 
accepting reservations tor Fall $2150 and 
up 512 Veteran 310 206 2655 



Westwood Village 

Vei7 large appartments tor 

September I st occuparKry. 

Built in kitchen. 

Balconies/ Patios. 

Pool, elevator, 

controlled-access building, 

subterranean parking 

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P«t4*ct for 3 iertanfs 



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July 17 or IM. 10 AM iw 2 PM 

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WALK TO UCLA 

Luxurious High-nse condo on Wilsnire & 
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lOth floor $1750 Available 8/2 818-991 
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IMAGINE OWNII^ WILSHIRE Corndor/H. 
Rise single lor 2bdrm $115K $250K Walk 
toUCLA/Village 24hr'secunty Spectacular 
views, pool. ^cuui. sauna valet service 
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BEAUTIFUL BRENTywOOO GUESTHOUSE 
with pnvate deck in exctiange lor thirty tiours 
ot cooking shopping, and grading papers 
weekly Fxpenerx^ed cook praterrad Cook 
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House for Rent 



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QUALITY UNIT w/hardwood/tile lloors 
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laundry available now $1975 and $2500 
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lloors fireplace central A'C parking, laun 
dry Pels Ok $2500 310 276-8505 

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1930s charm dil restored Central a/c se 
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hookups. r>ardwood floors lireplace 
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CARE FOR DISABLED PERSON In ex 
ctiange for room and tK>ard Beverly Hrils 
Respon8it>ie w/good references sought 310 
271 6837 Mina 

EXCHANGE 
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Close to school For 8t)rs Light trausehoM 
tasks and conversation in Itahan. Spanish, or 
French (Female praterrad) 310-472 9917 



9400 

Room tor Rent 



LOOKING FOR TWO daan. aaaygoing sen 
ous grad students to attara large. 3 
txlrTn/2bth w/25y/o outgoing professional le 
male Spacious huge yard washer/dryer 
two -car garage $550/mo -^utilities Sep 15 
213 796-0446 

LOVELY PRIVATE ROOM BATH AND 
PARKING in Santa Monica Towntwuse 
Ouiet Student Non Smoker Good Neigti 
borhood Convenient to transportation 
$750'month 310-828 7950 

PRIVATE BEVERLY HILLS HOME ROOMS 
FOR RENT Daily Monthly Seconds trom 
Beverty Wiishire Hotel Ammenities and pnv 
ilages Babysitting Call Christina 310-553 

7344 

ROOM FOR RENT 

5 rriinutes from UCLA close to t>each lovely 
room nice and quiet neigtibortiood $500 
CaN Anna 310-645 1692 

ROOMMATE NEEDED Professional Fe 
male non-srTX>ker preferred Agoura View 
Home One room Kitctien facilities Nice 
tMCkyard ar>d lacuz/i No pets S500 818 
991-4066 pager 213-991-0414 

SMALL ROOIIH$400). LARGER ROOMS 
(S550) in large ■awarly Hi«s house grad 
student preferred Kitctien pnvtleges wash 
er/dryer pool needs car Call At)by 310 275 
3831 or 818 763-5151 

WANTED Quiet male graduate student 
Lovely iumistied t)edroom w/rmcrowave ana 
fndge A/C near tHJS Lease quiet reterenc 
es $500/mo utilities included 310 312 



9^00 

Room tor Rent 



WEST LA/PALMS Female Roommate need 
ed in 2bdrm/2 Sbth condo Gated under 
ground parking wasnei'dryei in unit, partial 
ly-furnisried $8S0 month. utihlies 310386 
8824 



9500 

Roommates-Private Room 



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CHEAPEST 1BDRM IN 
WESTWOOD 

One bedroom avdiiable in 2be0 unit on Mid 
vale Full kitctten large bath hardwood 
fkx>rs. parking paiio. italk to UCLA |690 
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LOOKING FOR 1 2 easygoingciean/morai 
ly-sound students Share 2txJnW2bth West 
wood apt w/2maies Parking A/C DSL 
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year 310 208 984 ;f 

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UCLA . Your own room Spacious 
$590 00/mo 310 312-0130 



9600 

Roommates- Shared Room 



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Sublets 



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\1(»iMld\ )ul\ 9, 2(Mll 2rr 



ROWING 

Prom page 27 

program s hisiorv Belt»rc thai, she- 
was an assisiaiii coach at San Dicpo 
Slate Irom IWK-2()(MI aiul at the 
I nivcrsits (H IcnncsNCf ai 
ChattamHiga Irom I^WtvlWK 1 uHcr 
began coaching in l'W2. hcadini; ilic 
wirsiu womcn^crow Icaiii al I (SB 
"We hired (KulJer) hecauM- ol her 
taniastic rowing resume both a> a 
rower and a.s someone who i> laniiliar 
with the St)uthcrn ( alilornia rowmg 
communiH." \iiid associate .ilhlclics 
direcioi Bcis\ Stephenson 

The Brum leam hopes thai I uller s 
experience will push the program lo 
pro^es.s even further troni the luie- 
UifC i>l" Its previous coach. ( iuillermo 
Lemus Last year, the scjuad finished 
seventh in the nation in the women \ 
Lightwcnght K, .in impressive re.ii con- 
sidering the lact thai lhe> were C(Hn- 
peting against other unnersiix sanc- 
tioned squads with more up-K»-diiie 
equipment . i - > 

It will be im pBirf imd ftttr tttrtfi'^ 
goal to be av compelitive as p»)ssiblc 
as s«Hm .is possible. I uller added 
"Ihit I dtm I Ihink the plan is u> go 
abtuil It in a hurried lashu)i) I think 
we are g«»ing lo start building team 
morale Irom the bottom tip " 

One ol the Inst things ihal I uller 
wishes h) accomplish is. to recruit 
Inmi the student bixh I uller who 
did ntU Mart the sport unlil she was a 
sophomore in Lx>llege. leels that the 
L'C L.A campus is a maior lishmg 
pool lor walk-on athletes, .ind is glad 
to have an> woman with an> athletic 
experience lo gi\e rowing a lr\ 

"We woukJ love to have as man> 
people try tnii." Kuller declared 
"Everybtidv is welcome " 

Although she admits that there isa 
long road ahead before they CMI 
reach the Top 10. f-uller is optimistic 
(hat the squad will be able to mature 
into a contending NCAA team w ithin 
(he next coupk- ot years 



TELLER 

From page 2S 

p«)int Barr\ is on track to make his- 
tory di»esnt anNone in Vlajoi 
League Baseball care" 

ObMoiisK not 

Ton\ l.aRuss;t has been quoted .is 
siiymg that he's ruH cjMiceriKrd with 
Biirry s atlempl al the record, but 
more ItKu.sed on the penn.mt r.icc 

But this ts hisuwy. I<»lks. and every- 
oiK' seemed to be excited .it the begin- 
ning Heck, liSPNsSporlst enter 
even created a graphic to track 
Bt»nds and aleM \iewers of every new 
developmenl 

Sure Biirry has to work to etch his 
name in the record b<H>ks. but 
shouldn t he be given a chance' 

In W Mcdwire nailed 15 4>l his 7() 
home runs in September, •.ecoml-' 
most to the 16 he hil during the 
month of May McCiwire admitted 
that what made his September run 
even more ama/ing was the lact that 
laic in the seastMi you face loughei 
pitching, as most teams give ii all 
they ve got before the ligliti> go out on 
their season 

McCiwire recalled that he saw 
very lew pilches down the home 
stretch of the season, but he m.ide the 
pitchers pay lor the ones they ga\e 
him 

And maybe this is Bonds only 
hope for Ihe reci>rd working with 
what he s given 

Bitseball lans know that anything 
can happen from this point on in thi* 
season We re )ust getting ready lor 
Ihe All-Star break, and there are still 
74 regular-season games to go So for 
lans of baseball hisuiry everywhere. I 
hope thai Barry breaks the record 
(his season 

bven if they won't pitch to him 

Thouqh THIer is roosting in the Bay 
fitn^a for the sumnrwr, you can stlM e 
rvMil her at bkje$taf#vclajKki. 




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The Doily Bruin and MGM Pictures 

Invite you and a guest to see 

LEGALLY blonile 

At the Avco Theotre in Westwood Viiloge this Thursday 

Myirat7:30pni 

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mk SMpples bst & on hrst-come, first-served bosis One pass per person. 

OPENS NATKMVIflDE JULY 13 



26 Mondiiv Julv 9. 2(M)I 



Ddily Brum Sfparts 




Elite Womens Soccer camp participants execute 
drills with the UCLA women s soccer team. 



CAMPS 

From page 2S 

A large maj«>rity uf thusc 
who come lo these Lamp>« 
already have ii in their heads thai 
the\ v^ani to tome here." s;ml 
former I (1 A sotcer standout 
R\an Lee who attended the stK- 
eer camp to gam a rceruiimg 
cdjic hiN junior year ot high 
>ch*H)l Because liCLA coach- 
e> can only make a limited 
amount ol recruitin}! visits, a Ux 
ot high schiH»l players come here 
as a wav \o be seen Otteiitimcs. 



It can serve as a lurum tor uniuv 
liced alhtetes to showcase their 
talents " 

Another huge benefit lor the 
UCLA Athletic Department in 
conducting the camps is the rev- 
enue the visiting athletes bring to 
the campus Approximately $1 *> 
million in profits are made from 
the camps annually And accord- 
ing to<'hiu the camps also make 
giMKi use ol the dorm space and 
facilities v;u:ated by students dur 
ing during the summer 

I'ltimaieK though. Chiu 
believes its the Bruin teams that 
sell the kids on coming lo the 



summer campb 

"When a DCLA team wins a 
champKmship or a star athlete 
makes the headlines, people 
want to attend a UCLA camp 
and be part of the Brum spi^rts 
experience ■' Chiu said ■UCLA 
has an advantage over other 
schiH>ls in this regard because 
they have iusb a strong camp 
presence."' 

Fven with the advantages of 
prtjfits and recruiting lor the ath- 
letic department, the greatest 
benefit of UCLA spt)rts camps 
extends beyond athletics entirely 

'( oming here lor camp is the 



clotiest these students can be 
involved with UCLA without 
actually coming to sch(K>l here." 
Venegas said The kids are able 
to lorm a bond with the campus 
and experience the Brum student 
life first hand 

"kids that come here may not 
ever become .students at UCLA, 
but they may grow up liletimc 
UCLA tans, all because they 
came to camp here rather than 
use or fennessec or wherever 
else We reali/t this coming in. 
and do our best to make the 
camp experience one that they 
will alwavs remember ' 




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M«Mida\. JuK 9 2(HH 27 



UCLA Athletics Hal of Fame reopens after renovation 



EXPANSION: Project eost 
over $1 million; exhibits 
k) be updated regularly 



Daily IniiR Semor Suff 

The UCLA Athletics Hall ol Fame 
reopened last week in the cast wing ol 
the J.O. Morgan Intercullegialc 
Athletics Center alter renovations 
aimed to enhance the experience ol 
patrons 

The new reception area conlains a 
video wall with monitors which air 
great moments in Brum sports history 
and current spinning events The 
Brum Spirit Theater down the hail can 
ptay several UCLA championship 
moments m a stadium environment. 

To the right is the Hall of 
Champions, where all K6 national 
championship trophies are encased 
Behind fhal are display cases lor everv 
sport, including interactive display 
screens and tributes to Brum greats 
like John Wooden and Jackie 
Robinson 

Part ol an expansu>n protect that 
latt year luw ike Mnrmn Center 



UST OF NEW ATTWACnONS 



The newly reopened UCLA Athletics Hall of fame features moments in Bniin sports htstof y 
with a wnety of new e«h*rts at the Morgan Center. 

ImaS^TIiMtir 

With 34 iNts. it's pauiUe to new wiiF of 
the moTF nwflMoMr UCLA dtampisMiiip 
iiwu m m in a stidiuw e n wrontnewt 



A display of iHabnatHNul 
trophies witti i ttalr-of-the-art 
dnplay 



Other ExtNMts 

• Dispiay cdsfs. including mftnoraOiiu. tor eadi 
spor aims to reco^nur past and piesem coadies, 
student athletes and accomphshnwnf s 

• Ifrtwles to club spons, fanv band and spiril 
SMpport fmups will include a 1970 auttaentK 
ice Bruin mascot suit on display 

• tributes John Wooden, iadiif Robinson. 
OtympK athletes and women in sports 



Time Out Zone 

To be opened at a later date.it will include a 
children's museum and ^ame room, wheie 
iHds will be able to play Brum wdeo 9anwi. 

Walking Timeiine 

Showi haw sports Kwaiies mto htstofy, 
pnwidmg Unks to UCLA. Calitomu. Unitetf' 
States and wortdevems 



increase m size by about 70.000 square 
leet to ac-ccmimodatc the new iidminiv 
tration building, the Hall ol hamc 
expansion cost m<irc than $1 million 
all ol It lund-raised. while it increased 
in size from 4.000 to K.OOO square leet 
Arland Kdlv. enrolled m the UCLA 
biiskclball summer camp and visiting 
campus and the Hall ol hainc with his 



torn amt/pu^ tiiiir smm si«ii 

coach Dcno Anderson, was not sur- 
prised alter being told tit the awt4;>l the 
expansion project 

1 believe it Kelly said i love 
sports and this is lusi awcstinie " 

Though It's not finished. Ken 
Wcincr. IJCLA asscKialc athletics 
director in charge ol busines.N opera- 
tions, promises thai the neu Hall of 



I amc will not hi- like the old one 

According to Weiiiet. the old Hall 
ol lame was rarels updated but thai 
will change with new exhibitions .iiul 
updated options on interactive menus 
everv six months lo a yciir 

The Hall.ol fame will alwavs be a 
work m progress, which is an impor- 
tant thing because the old Hall ol 
Fame was vcrv static and two-dimen- 
sional.' Weiner said 'That s not what 
we wanted this one lo be Now it s 
much more three-dimensional much 
mt>re dynamic' 

The Hall ol 1 amc was mostiv com- 
pleted bv mici-June when a gala open- 
ing was held lor the donors, which led 
Weiner to decide U> »>pen ihe Hall ol 
fiime to the puWic This way Weiner 
and his stall ctiuld get feedback 

Weiner and kevin Borg. laciliiies 
director and pro»ect manager lor inter- 
collegiate atliletics. each visiled 10 lo 
12 halls ol lame in three days when 
researching ideas Included m their 
trip was the Rock and Roll Hall ol 
Fame, the Basebiill Hall ol Fame and 
the Notre Dame Hall of Fame 
Coaches also gave input on their spe- 
cifit sports 

Werner's vision was to lurn the first 



lev* exhibits inti> people-i>rienled expe- 
riences while maintaining the historic 
appeal ol the memorabilia-heavv sec 
lions in the Hall ot Fame 

l"he philo.v)phv that I put in (the 
entrance) is that rt's not in-your-face 
athletics.' Weiner said "And then we 
reallv kept the Hall ol Champions as 
.sort ol a sacred rtwm All thai happens 
in there is everything abtiut our prcv 
gram " 

The more tralTic the HaH oi Fame 
receives, the more pet>plt will w ant lo 
get involved. Weiner said With sum- 
mer exposure, he hopes U) develop a 
docent program where volunteers will 
be available lo answer questions, 
escort pe»>ple. and do special lours 

"We've alreadv had people who 
have gone through and said. Oh. vou 
know. I have an old I^Os liH)tball uni- 
form thai you might be interested in 
and 1 said Heck yeah 1 would.'" 
Weiner said "That's how hopefully it 
IS gcJing to grow " 

Tfie Hall of Fame is open Monday 
through Friday from 8 a.m to 5 p.m It 
will also be open before nfien's basket 
ball home games No admission is 
charged. 



ROWING 

From page 2S 

been intercsled in the p*)siiion. quickly 
grabbed the opportunitv and applied 
for. the job 

"if I can be a part of not only the 
greatest athletic department in the 
country but also be bv mv lamilj^ a ua 
dream come true she added. 

Fuller brings with her the experience 
that most rowers, both professional 
and amateur, can onl\ dream about 



Being a thrt*e-lime Olympian and an 1 1- 
jiime member oi the US National 
Team, she has accunuilaled m4>re than 
25 national and international rowing 
litks 

"Having an Olympian will defi- 
nitely raise team morale and learn 
expectatitms.' said senior Delia Lucas 

La-si season. Fuller was an assistant 
ctiach at Stanford, helping the 
Cardinals obtain .i spot in the Top 20 
national ranking lor the first tiiiK in the 



New goalkeeper 
coach hired 

Peter Van de Ven will take over 
the goalkeeper coaching duties at 
U(T A. mens soccer head coach 
Todd Saldatia announced last week 

Van de Ven will be filling a 
vacancv left when David Vanole 
departed i») become the goalkeeper 



coach lor the Washington 
Freedom, which is of the Women s 
Linitcd Soccer Association 

■" Peter is one ol the lop tip-and- 
coming goalkeeper coaches in the 
region." Saldaiiii said in a prcs> 
release "He has excellent plaving 
experience, as well as collegiale and 
youth ciKiching experience 

A former standout while al the 
I niversitv of Washington. Van de 



Ven s coaching credentials include 
lime spent at Chapman University 
(I'>«>»1-2000). Mater IX-i High 
SchiH>l (I9W-2(H)I) and ;i pair of 
club level teams 

Van de Ven. a Santa An.i nativt;. 
also spent parts of the 2000 season. 
\Mth Maji>r League StKcer's Li>s 
Angeles Cialaxy 

Brief compiled from wire reports 



AmimoN All Ucu Students, Hcum & Staff! 

Tne 2001 Mercedes-Benz Cup Presents... 




1 1 

I UCLA BRUIN DAY • Jvly SS*^ I 

I fPr** Ticket OHerl | 



i 



This original coupon ad in thf l)aih Bniin entitles the holder (1'(1A students, 
faculn. and staff with valid identification) to two (2) PIEE hnrt available Lofcr 
Ikkels and is availaMe oaly on Moaday. jaly 2.^ NOT VALID FOR AM OTHFK 
SESSIONS This ciHipon ad mast he exchanged al the Tournament Box Office onlv 
on julv 1^ and is siibjecl lo availahilin at the tinw of exchange This offer is not 
valid (or an\ other sessions, has no cash valiH-. and cannot he sold (xiupon 
distrihtition is prohibited on Ihe grounds of the Los Angek^ Fennis («Her / LCLA 



UCLA BKUIN DAY • Jwly 23" 

fS fM' 1 Tiak«l OHt} 

This original coupon ad in the Dailv Bniin entitles the holder (I C.I.V students 
facuin and staff with valid identificauon ) to oae (I) FIEE best available 
Lapt ticket mliea a Laft ticket is purchaiicd This coupon is valid for 
EVENIN<; SESSION onlv Monday |hK 25 NOT VALID FOR \N^ OTIIKR S^^SION^ 
This coupon ad must hi' exchanged at the TiHimament Bov Office onlv or |iil\ 
I't and IS siibiect lo availahilitv at the lime of exchange This offer is not valid lor 
anv other ses.sions has no cash vaiiKv and cannot be sold (^iiipon distribiilion 
is prohibited on thi' gnuinds of the lr>s \ngeles Tennis («iler / I'CLA 



I 
f 



Ut tonla« iMwIt CMtw • KU • StrMM SHiAmn 
Nr Hdi«t( Mril (310) •CU-101 • www. w rc>d»«-fc— i«op.«ow 



n Men edes-Benz Cu|) 

'*''^ JUIV 21 to JOIY 2» • UCIA 



28 



C'Atnw visit <HJr Web 
sHe' We KUdranle«- 
n-atlini; sdtislai tion 
or vtHir iT)<)iic\ ba( k 
Hut It s ln'( jtiNWdV, 
so wlijt drc vdii 
((iiii|)|jiniiic iilMuil' 



vvvsw (IdiKhrmn ii< la «'<lii 




Daily Bruin 



orts 



The expanded Hall of Fame 
was opened to the public 
last week, with new exhibits 
and more See page 27. 



Mondav liih 9, 2(K>1 



UCLA 




Barry Bonds desert 
diance to make history 



>i.«iio»ff ^H>rtvlntrHiiw*lMK' 



Former Stanford assistant rowing coach Amy FuNar coaches the Cardinal team. Fuller is the new rowing head 

coach for UCLA. 

UCLA names rowing team coach 



FULLER: New hire is part 
of major program ehange 
for newly sanctioned sport 



By 

Daily Brum Contributor 

Am> hullcr. an mlernalionalK celc- 
bralcd rowing athlete, was hired as 
head coach ol the women s rowing 
leain Jul> 2 This paves the way lor h 
ma|or tacclitt that the squad must pre- 
pare tor in the upcoming season, its 
first year as an orTicially sanctioned 
mlercollegiale sport at UCLA after its 
i(>-year stmt as a club team 

The announcement is just the latest 
alteration to the slew i)f changes that 
the program will soon encounter 
Everything from new equipment to 
scholarships is in store for the team. 
althi>ugh scholarships wont be avail- 
able until 21M)2 

"Brums have always been a part of 
my life and s<^ ii is familiar territory for 
me and I m really excited to be a part ol 



ROWING HEAP COACH AMY FULLER 

Here are somf of Coadi Fuller s rowing achievements 

• Named as the U.S. rowing female athlete of the 
year in 1993. 

• Finalist for the Sullivan Award in 1995, given 
annually to the nation's top amateur athlete. 

• Won a silver medal in the 1992 Barcelona 
Olympics; placed 4th in 1 996 at Atlanta and 6th 
in 2000 at Sydney in the same event, the 
Women's 4 without Coxswain. 

• Since 1 986, Fuller has earned 1 S medals in tfie U.S. National 
Championships, including 1 2 gold medals, 2 silver and 1 brorue. 




that athletic department." Fuller said 

f uller. whose lather is a I K'LA alum- 
nus, had grown up in Westlakc Village 
and hoped to follow in her fathers foot- 
steps However, before the news of her 
wait-list status from UC^LA had reached 
her. she had already committed herself 
to L'C Siinta Barbara, where she gradu- 



S{ AN WATf l«S/t>«ly tnmn S«ww Sufl 



ated there with u degree in biology 

Away from the Los Angeles area for 
15 years. UCLA still lingered in the 
back of her mind When she heard thai 
there was an opening in the Brum 
coaching statT. Fuller, who has always 



COLUMN: Giants tfftlpr 
could set the record, but 
no one will pitch to him 

As f walked xxp to ftc ftdl 
Park on the first of July. I 
was filled with anticipation 
ol what the day would hold for my 
man Barry To commemorate his 
otVicial day. a sellout crowd was on 
hand to celebrate Barry Bonds' 
greatest accompli.shmen( thus far 
becoming the 17th major leaguer 
ever to break the .StM) home run 
mark 

With his family, including his 
father. lornKr Ciianl great Bobby 
Bi>nds. his 
high schiKil 
coach and 
even two 
members of 
the opposing 
team. Mark 
Mctiwire 
and B<ibby 
Bonilla. on 
hand. Barry 
was honored 
as a Giant 
great 

Barry had 
not only surpassed the 500 1 
but he had also been on a home 
run tear since the beginning of the 
season - something that everyone 
at Pac Bdl was well aware of. 

How perfect would it have been 
to sec Barry bomb number 40 into 
McCovey Cove im Barry Boiulk 
Day'' 

But the fans knew«^ wb 
really going to happen St Louis 
Cardinals manager Tony LaRussa 
wasn't going to give him anything 
to hit 

Barry had accrued a league- 
leading number of walks up to that 
point of the season, and he reached 
first base with a walk in his first 
three at-bats 

Despite the rousing boos from 
every peraoh in the ballpark, the 
Cardinal pitciters didn't throw any- 
thing close 

Finally Mike Matthews, the 




Qiristiiui 



Cards" fourth pitcher of the day. 
gave Barry si>n[u:thing to work 
with His shot fell just short of the 
left-field wall, aitd almost gave the 
fans what they were liK>king for. 
. ; Which brings me to my point, 
how IS Barry going to have a legiti- 
mate chance at the record if 
nobody will pitch to him? 

Eleing the Cuants fan and psy- 
chology student that I am. I think 
about this and analyze it from dif- 
ferent angles 

At the beginning of the season. 
Bonds homered more than once m 
several games He was m the 
gr(K>vc and had found a comfort 
/one with his swing Now that he's 
being walked almost every time 
he's up. he isn't having the same 
chance to take cots to keep his 
swing fresh 

And then comes the question, 
why won't they pitch to San 
FrancisciVs most enigmatic 
ballplayer'' 

It's no secret that the goal of 
baseball is to win So obviously, 
eliminating any chance for Bondl 
to knock in a run or even create 
some offense will give the oppot' 
ing team a better chance to win 

The fifth through seventh spots 
in the Imeup give pitchers even 
more iitcentive not to pitch to 
Bonds They just haven't been 
strong so far this season for the 
Giants, so opposing pitchers have 
a ttetter chance of getting an out. 
or at least not giving up a home 
run. when they throw to the guys 
after Bonds 

, 'McGwire, the last man to chal- 
tenge and break the home run 
record, went through the same rou- 
tine, notching 162 walks in 1^ 
1998 season 

At this point. Barry is still juM 
ahead of where McGwire wm m 
'98. as McGwire didn't get ■?9 or 
40 until July 1 1. against Houston. 
Without « home run in 14 games, 
Barry looks to be stuck in a baaes- 
on-balls rut 

But back to my original senth 
mental and spinl-of-the-game 



Sw 



Summer camps cater to wannabe Bruin athletes 



PROGRAM: Instniction 
gi\en to participants bv 
LCLA coaches, players 



By 

Daily Brum Staff 

Brum sports teams may be (»n 
hiatus tor the summer, but the 
I (L.A sports machine keeps on 
churnmg For members ol the ath- 
letic department, the bulk o( their 
olTseast>n work includes involvc- 
mcnl with the4'> sessions of sp»)rtN 
camp programs that lake place on 
campus during the warm summer 
months 

From basketball w pole \auli 
mg, football to water polo I '(LA 
has the camp to match thc.sporis 
program Of the 12 sports that arc 
represented at the camps, all 
mvolve the planning and partici- 



pation of respective UCLA head 
coaches Oftentimes Brum ath- 
letes help coach the camps as well 
"What s great about our pro- 
gram IS that we can have camps 
like basketball and baseball and 
attract numerous players all 
throughout 

California." ^_^____^^^ 
said Julie Chiu. 
in her fifth year 
as the UCLA 
Athletic 
Department s 
head camp 
director We 
can also have 

specialized 

camps like 
itirowing or 

pole vaulting, that attract young 
athletes from across the country 
because there aren't many camps 
like them being offered any- 
where " 



Approximately $1.5 

million in profits are 

made from the 

camps annually. 



Over 4.500 kids are invdved in 
UCLA sports camps over the 
course of the year, most of them 
taking place in the summer 
Additional tennis and baseball 
camps are held in the winter, as 
well as various clinics organized 
by the athletic 
_^_^_,^__,^,^ department 
during the 
year. 

"Every 
camp has lis 
own specrfic 
level." said 
track and Held 
head coach Art 

Venegas. who 

will be oversee- 
ing the shot- 
put and discus thrtnving camp this 
week While the throwing camp 
might emphasize a very special- 
ized technique, other camps like 
football might work on several dif- 



ferent aspects of their overall 
game 

Although recruiting isn't the 
central ftxrus of the camps, the ses- 
sions themselves serve as mutually 
rewarding arenas for aspiring ath- 
letes and coaches alike 

"The camps are becoming a 
really efTecttve tod m recent years 
to help us identify who the stand- 
out athletes are. and for them to 
make a connection with us." 
Venegas said "A lot of athletes 
come here to find tnit if a certain 
couch IS the right fit or if 
Westwood IS the right environ- 
ment lor them 

While the summer camps may 
help alleviate recruiting commit- 
ments for tfie coaches, most o( the 
time It IS the camp atteitdees who 
seek to make a name for them- 
selves. 




perfects her pole ¥MiH at 
Dakg Stadium durirtg vaulting summer camp. 



DAILY BRUIN 



S«»r\itit! ihr I'*'L.\i'<»inmuiiil\ .sim-*- 1M1M 

Trade barrier 

Th*' IT.S. .shouhln I U>t <'hina 
intotht'WlX). 

VIEWPOINT. PAGE It 




M(>\!).\Y..lri.v 1().2(H)1 



www.iliiih'lirtiiri.iirla.criii 



Blonde ambition 

Kjm's*' Wi(h(Ts|NM>n .siais in lh«' 
ni'w fom«'fiy "l^'^allv Hlontli ."" 
A&E. PAGE 14 



Tra\ el (ah\s 

Two I'CI^A .stutli'tils stiKiyii)^ 
aiiniati i*'il thi'ir.storii's. 
NEWS. PAGE 3 



Settlement reached 
between UC, Enron 



f: I ni vers Hies lo 
extend contract for two 
years under agreement 



By rwrtiy KiWb ;-:-\;V: 
Daily Brum Senior St0: 

The I'niversity of Calirornia and 
California Slate University will 
receive their power from bnron 
Energy Services until their current 
contract expires in 2002 due lo a 
settlement reached between the 
three parties last week 

After 2002. the universities have 
committed themselves to a two-year 
extension of the contract, accord- 
ing to the settlement which was 
announced July II 

The agreement covers all U( 
campuses except L'CLA and VC 
Riverside which receive their 
power through local providers such 
as the Los Angeles Department of 
Water and Power 

The universities brought Enron 
to court after the company trans- 
ferred energy providing services lo 
Southern California Edison and 
Pacific Gas Sl Electric utility com- 
panies, which have been troubled 
by financial problems caused by the 
Mate energy crises 

Though the I'C would not have 
paid more under the switch. olTi- 
ciais opposed it because of the 
"shaky" situation of the utilities 
and the costs associated with 
changes in accounting and measur- 



ing electricity, said L( spokesman 
Chuck McFadden 

The universities alleged that 
Enron handed off the power sup- 
plying duties to the utilities to make 
money by stockpiling energy and 
selling It at high prices. McFadden 
said 

Enron was contractually com- 
mitted to selling energy t(> the uni- 
versities at a low price despite sky- 
rocketing prices caused by the 
deregulation of the power industry, 
he continued 

"If you were a Houston electrical 
power brisker and you had a con- 
tract to supply electricity to the I'C 
and you were selling it to make your 
profit, toddling along, and all of a 
sudden the (market) goes skyrock- 
eting and you have all this electrici- 
ty, what would you do''" McFadden 
said 

Enron denied the alleg<itions 

"As we have said all along, we do 
not pre-purchase power in 
( alifornia." said Enron spokesman 
Peggy Mahoney. 

The universities were joined in 
court by state Attorney General 
Bill Lockyer on March 12 when 
they sought a preliminary injunc- 
tion against Enron to keep them as 
"direct access" customers 

Lockyer joined the case because 
of the "significant implications lor 
the taxpayers of California." said 
Nathan Barankm. communications 
director for the attorney general. 




A crowd in Beijing July 1 3 celebrates the announcement that China will host the 2008 Olympics Carries. 
The International Olympic Committee picked China over bids from Toronto, Paris, Istanbul and Osaka. 

Qijna to host 2008 Olympic Games 



BEUING: Controversial 
selection process ends in 
final decision from IOC 



ByMichaalcTi 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

After heated controversy over 
human rights violations, the 
International Olympic Committee 
awarded Beijing. China, the covet- 
ed honor of hosting the 200K 



Summer Olympic Ciames at their 
meeting m Moscow Friday 

Beijing won 56 of the KK 
secret-ballot voles the clear 
majority needed for its election as 
host city in the second round o\ 
voting while Us nearest competitor. 
Tort>nlo received 22 votes 

The KK was unable lo reach a 
clear majority in the first round ol 
voting, so the l(X eliminated Ihe 
least popular city. Osaka. Japan, 
and moved on to a second vote. 

Paris and Istanbul, Turkey, were 
als(> among the top five cities cim- 



sidered as possible hosts for the 
Summer Games of the XXIX 
Olympiad in 2(M)« 

"The Chinese Ciovernnwni and 
people will go all oul \o support 
Beijing lo carry forward the 
Olympic spirit, promote world 
peace and enhancir friendship 
among the peoples ot the world," 
said President of the People s 
Republic of China, Jiang Zemin, in 
a statement to the UK president 

Yet others are not happy about 



9CV VIVM^^^^f ^B^P B 



Conflict arises over student media audit 



RESOLUTION: Validit> of 
board's decision to table 
proposal is questionable 



BvlMlyl 

Daily Brum Senior Staff 

As some ol last years members 
go oul and next year's come in. and 
amid confusion brought on by a by- 
law in Its constitution, the 
Associated Students of L ( L.A 
Communications Board has not yet 
decided on a S I5.0(M^S20.0<M) audit 
of student media 

The communications board - 
the entity which oversees publish- 
ing, management and operation of 
all student media, including the 
Daily Brum. UCLA news- 
magazines and UCL.A television 
and radio voted 7-4 in a July 1.^ 
meeting lo table a proposed 
SI5.0O0-S20.0O0 audit of student 



But after the vote, graduate stu- 
<tent board member Jim Caufield. 
who voted against tabling the audit, 
expressed concern about the legiti- 
macy of the vote He directed the 



board to a clause in the communi- 
cation board's constitution, which 
stales new board members are to 
take their seats at the end oi spring 
quarter, which they have yet to do 
I nder the constitution at leas) 
SIX board members' terms, includ- 
ing that M board chair Arshad Alt. 



Six board members' 
terms had expired 
before the meeting 



had already expired before the 
meeting was called thus their 
votes would be void 

"At this point the whole thing is 
in chaos." said alumni board mem- 
ber Sara Goodman, toward the end 
of the meeting 

Professional representative Tim 
Alger, who introduced the resolu- 
tion to the board, said the audit, 
would be a complete review of stu- 
dent media 

Though Alger later said the 
financial situation and the quality 



of student media publications are 
g(HKl. he said in his presentation 
that some board members had " sig 
nificant concern about the things 
that have gone on in the depart- 
ment and the management of the 
department " 

Later Alger said, "there were 
some issues " with media director 
Arvli Ward hut he would no\ spec- 
ify what those issues were, nor who 
was concerned with Ward and his 
performance 

Bui others argued that Ward i> 
doing and cxcclleni job as media 
director 

"Student media by every me:i- 
■iure I know i$ in the best condition 
Its ever been " said Mike ("line, 
another professional btiard mem- 
ber 

Cline said student media is in 
great shape financially, offers a 
quality product, and has more 
internships, iravel programs and 
alumni involvement than ever 
before 

"All ol these programs have 
been put together by the media 
director at ihe labk,' (line said. 



UPTE union, university finalizi 
bargaining, await ratification 



CONTRACT: Nt^'otiations 
include pa> rais<\ career 
Status afler l.(KK) hours 



•y Marcell* Ridiarit 

Datty brum Senior Stdff 

The I ni\crsity Prolessional and 
Technical Employees union has 
finali/ed contract negotiations with 
the university aftei filing and drop- 
ping an unfair labor practice 
charge 

Ihe contract iiuludcs .i 4 .s i>' -^ 
percept raise, career status to casu 
al wtirkers after I.IIOO hours and 
"impri>\od language' to minimi/e 
subcontracting ai the unixcrsitv 

The contract will not be released 
until July I' and must still be rati- 
fied by union members in a \ote 
July 27 

"We're very pleased with the set 
tiement. a movement has been 
made forward,' said Daniel 
Martin, svsiem-wide director of 
UPTE 



I nion members «.aid the mi>st 
imposing difficulty they fitced was 
the delay m action 

the bargaining process was ini- 
tially scheduled lo conclude at the 
May 21-22 meeting between I PIF 
and IC represenlatnes 

But opposing stances on the lan- 
guage in the contract delayed mat 
lers. said kimberly Mc Mpin. 
l:CLA labor relations specialist 

fhc inclusion of firelighters .it 
ihe Lawrence Berkeley laboratory 
as a new group under I PTF s con- 
stituency caused problems in the 
.ipproval ot the contr;icI shx 
.idded 

IPTF benefits and stipulaiion^ 
will nov^ extend to firefighters since 
I C agreed to accept the terms 

"I'm satisfied with the contract 
Mc Alpin said There was give and 
take on both sides It lusi ioi>k 
awhile " 

However, some union members 
feel the negotiatums were post- 
poned due lo what they saw as the 



Sw 



Daily Brum Newt 



Monday. July 16. 2001 3 



I Moiidjx. July It) 2(M)| Oaity Brum New* - ■ ^^^^^ 

Ex-Rampart officer Pferez transferee! to state prison I /^ p XXT N C 

^AMDAI* MovfrniilH ci.ils immcdialel\ m) that he couid ot Los Angeles I9W Id plead guilt\ and cooperate Department and the slate ■ H ^^f jk^r J^ J^ JL, ^L. ^ ^^^^ 



SCANDAL \1()\(' could 
lead lo an t'ciriicr rclcast' 
diilc imdt'f program [)lan 

The Associated Press 

\! thi- r^.•^uc^I nl •! ludjic aiilhori- 
llL•^ ii.instcrrcd dl^gr.n.'t•d lornicr 
poiKc olticcr RataL'l Pcrc/ liom a 
ciHiiH\ M>l l.n.ilil\ li> a stale prison 
.liil\ 1 ■' ti' hasten his release troni 
i.iisiiid\ 

Superiiu ( ourl Judue Kobcrt 
IVrr\ on UiK 12 ordered thai Perez 
be turned o\ei lo slate prison olti- 




Financial aid to 
cover insurance 

I oi I ( I \ students on tinaneial 
aid ihc I iiiaiivial Aid ntlice wit! .idd 
"s4|s lo lis pet -student huduel to 
ci'\ei additional tosis whieli m.i\ be 
bri>uj:ht >'ii b\ uni\ersit\-required 
health insuraiue 

Because ol a new I ( polics set 
last September undergraduate stii- 
vlenls will be required lo have health 
insurance co\erai!e starting in the tall 

oirooi 

\i I ( I A about a quartei ot the 
students did ni>t have health insur- 
ance last vcar said Michele Pearson, 
director i>l ancillarv services ,ii the 
Arthur Ashe Student Health and 
\^ellness ( enter 

1 ninsured students can purchase 
the I ndergraduate Student Health 
Insurance Package tor S5^4 a year, a 
rale nian\ times lower than that o\ 
nit side private health insurance com 
panics according lo Pearson 

Bill sonic I (I A students alsi> 
.•\piL-<scd (.oncerns about ramitica 
li'Ps ,>i ihc pohcv 

I L'uess il In a good ide.i. because 
\oii never know what can happien to 
\ou in the luiiiie Bui some students 
.ire loi.illv sell-supporling. and lhe> 
don I have ;hc monev to buv health 
insurance. san.i lulie Tran a seconii- 
ve.ii psvchologv student 

Medical center 
still best in west 

I ( 1 \ \tedical ( entei ranks as 
the Ik-sI Ihispita! m the western 
I nited States lur the I2lh consecu- 
tive >eai. according ii> a I S \ews& 
\Vorld Report survev ot 2.^ 5l) board- 
certified phvsicians trom acr(»ss the 
n.ition 

I he 12th annual guide to 
America s best hospitals' w ill be on 
iu'w-,siands lulv Id 

I ( I A Medical (enter, ranked as 
the lilth-best hospital nalionallv in 
the latest survev. is the onl\ Southern 
( alitorni.i hospital lo earn a spot on 
the maga/me s 'h<»m>r roll" rankings 
during the 12 ve<«fs I S \ew . has 
conducted the survcv 

The honor roll recopni/es hospi- 
'aU ih.ii demoiislrale exLellence 
acroN-, nian\ speci.ilties 



cials immediateh so that he could 
begin earning good time-work 
lime credits The credits trim one 
d.iv oil a sentence tor each da> 
served while doing various prison 
work without having disciplrnarv 
problems 

Perez was translerred from the 
( eniurv Regional Detention 
h acilitv in Lynwood to the 
C alilornia (Orrectional Institution 
in lehachapi 

He s in our security housing 
unit That s the highest level ot 
attention we can give anybody." said 
Paul Uoodky. a spi»kesman lor the 
prison located about 1 15 miles north 



(»r Los Angeles 

Perez. .V^. was placed in the high- 
security unit lor his own protection. 
WoiMlley said 

Pere/'s lawyer. Winston kevin 
McKesson, asked the court July 12 
lo release his client immediatelv 

Perez had been serving time in 
the county lacility. where the state 
gives credit at the reduced rale ot 
one da> lor every two days in cus- 
tody 

Perez was arrested in August 
I9y« tor stealing $1 million worth of 
cocaine from an evidence room 

After a trial that ended in a jurv 
deadlock, he agreed in September 




T 



Hin .wiir,!^ 



This honor reinforces I'C'LAs 
commitment lo excellence in patient 
care and medic.i! advances ' said Dr 
Cicrald S I evcy. provost and dean of 
the I (LA Sch»H>l of Medicine "We 
congratulate our facullv and staff for 
helping I (LA earn this well- 
dcNcrved disiinction 

A survev by the National Opinion 
Research ( enier at the I niversity of 
('hicagi> ol |s(l board-cerlified physi- 
cians tn each o\ the I" medical spe- 
cialties serves as the base for the I S 
\ews raniings Lach physician ranks 
the leading hospitals in his i>r her spe- 
cialty 

Judging the quality ot medical 
care is an increasingly important and 
complex Issue.' said t>r Michael 
Karpl. director ol the LK'LA 
Medical (enter "This survey pnv 
vides one key source ol information 
tor consumers since it demonstrates 
the respect lor I ( L.A Medical 
( enter by a peer group ot physicians 
nationwide We re honored by this 
recognition ' 

I (LA ranked highlv m numerous 
specially areas, including a number 
one ranking in geriatrics tor the lOth 
consecutive year In the tield ol psy- 
chiatry the LCLA Neuropsychiatric 
Hospital was ranked best in the west- 
ern I niled Stales and si.xlh in the 
couiilrv 

UCs work to treat 
prostate cancer 

I (I A is administering a S50 mil- 
lion prostate cancer treatment pro- 
gram lor uninsured men Improving 
Access ( oun>eling and Treatment 
lor ( alifornians with Prostate 
( .inccr 

In (alilornia. a total ol 2I.IH(i 
new cases of prostate cancer were 
diagnosed in I9W " said Dr Jean B 
dekernion chair ot the LCLA 
Department of Lrology and the 
(lark Lrological (enter Timely 
treatment is critical with prostate 
cancer and this program will help us 
I each more men in (alilornia than 
ever before " 

I ('LA. L( San Francisco and 
L( Davis are the three initial sues, 
though I '( Irvine and L( San Diego 
will |oin the ranks next year Lach 
center will cotlaborale wilh other 
health centers in the stale as well as 



community providers 

Men who are ineligible for Medi- 
( al or Medicare, have no or msulTi- 
cienl health insurance, or have 
incomes under 2(1(1 percent the feder- 
al poverty level may partake in the 
program 

■ This IS a major award for UCLA 
and the DC" System." said Dr Cierald 
S Levey. llC'LAs provi>st ot med- 
ical sciences and dean of the schtMtl 
of medicine "We are very pleased lo 
administer this program. ihal will 
help improve men's health in 
( alifornia " 

Flight formation 
to lower gas costs 

LCLA engineers are turning lo 
nature lo help solve a very problem; 
the rising costs of fuel for air travel 

Researchers al The Henry 
Samucli School of Engineering and 
Applied Science have designed an 
instrument that makes il easier lor 
pilots to fly multiple aircraft in a V- 
lormation much like a fltKk of 
( anada geese and they're going to 
lest the new device on two L-18 fight- 
er jeis this month 

The engineers and their partners 
at NASA claim that by flying planes 
m formation, fuel consumption can 
be reduced by 20 percent The device 
thai LiCLA is testing provides impor- 
tant data thai makes maintaining 
such a formation easier and safer 

Dubbed a "formation flight instru- 
mentation system." this shoe-box- 
si/ed gadget measures the relative 
position, velocity and attitude of 
each plane while il s flown in forma- 
tion 

According to Professor Jason 
Speyer. lead investigator for this pro- 
ject at L'CLA. the goal is lo "fly 
planes in formation m order to save 
fuel.' which could save some compa- 
nies hundreds of thousands of dollars 
each year 

The advantages of formation 
flight have long been known By fly- 
ing in a V-shaped formation, each 
pilot can save energy by 'hiding" 
behind the wing of a neighboring 
plane where there is less wind resis- 
tance, or drag. 

Reports from Daily Bruin staff and wire 
services. 



Deal^Daiy 



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fence 



I9W to plead guilty and cooperate 
with investigators in exchange for 
leniency He was sentenced ihe fol- 
lowing February to five years in 
prison 

Pere/ ignited a scandal after he 
alleged wrongdoing in the depart- 
ment, including assaults and frame- 
ups by the anti-gang unit in which he 
worked. liKaled in the city's tough 
Rampart area However, he has 
never testified in court against other 
officers - 

When It came time to consider his 
release under terms of a plea agree- 
ment, authorities from Ihe district 
atlornev s office, the Sheriffs 



Department and the slate 
Department of Corrections said 
Pere2 had not earned enough credits 
for release because he never eaiered 
the stale system 

Perry said the agencies' position 
was unfair to Perez, who counted on 
being released early for cooperating 
as an informant in a police scandal 
Perry reluctantly refused to release 
Perez, but ordered his transfer lo a 
stale facility. 

All parties in Perez's sentencing 
case were ordered back to court July 
23 and the judge said the sheriff 
must then show cause why Perei 
should not be released 



Corrections: 

Peter Hammond's name was misspelled a "UA Ccns 10 OMenee LXiBT 

nationalcumculum ' (News. July 9) -"^ 

In "Spike and Mike' reveal clever animation shorts" (Arts 4 
Entertainment. July M). ii was incorrectly staled that "For the Birds" was an 
Oscar nominee lor Best Animated Short Film in 2U(XJ 'Rejected" was nomi- 
nated m that category '.;;'; 

Clarifications: 

In the story "Task force W^imtmg LGBT national curriculum" (News. 
July 9) the National Education Association is a union with political influ- 
ence but without the authority \o directl> dctcrrninc anfrftkiai n»tional cur- 
riculum , ' 

In the story "Budget drafts may hurt UC schools" (News. July 9). 
Assemblyman Paul K.oret/. D-West Hollywood, represents the district thiu 
includes UCLA 



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Studying abroad allows 
students to gain new 



AWAY 



EXPERIENCES AND EDUCATION 



Daily Brum Contributor 

This suimner fourth-year physicv 
logical sciences student Alayna 
Scruggs is trading the beaches of 
Santa Motiica for the crystal blue 
waters of the Caribbean island of 
Barbados. 

Across the Atlantic Ocean, fourth- 
year theater student Valerie Morrell 
is spending her days strolling through 
the courtyards and gardens of the 
University of C ambridge and enjoy- 
ing her nights and early morninp in 
Britain's pub scene 

Morrell and Scruggs are partici- 
pating in Education Abroad 
Programs offered by VC Irvine and 
UCLA, respectively These programs 
offer students units toward their 
degrees and can fulfill major require- 
ments as well 

Through UCLAs EAP alone, 
about 300 students a year study 
abroad in 34 countries around the 
world The V'CLA EXPO 
Internships and Study Abroad ser- 
vice center provides additional study 
abroad options as well as internship 
opportunities abroad. 



T was told that in L.A. att 

we do is gang-bang and 

drive-by shootings." 



Fourth-yrar theater student 



In England. Morrell has visited 
sites that complement her theater 
studies at UCLA 

Substituting for UCLA's Royce 
Hall is London's Globe Theatre. The 
theater is a faithful replica of the orig- 
inal Elizabethan theater, partly buih 
from the ruins of the origmal venue 



IKlLii Shakespeare's pro- 
ductions were held during 
the 1 7th century 

While at the Globe 
Theatre. Morrell watched 
a performance of "King 
Lear." a rare treat for a stu- 
dent who has spent years 
studying Shakespeare's 
dramas in the classroom It 
was an event that couldn't 
be duplicated on a Los 
Angeles stage 

"The production was 
excellent and was quite an 
experience, considering 
the historical value of 
being in a place where 
many of his plays were 
first put on." Morrell said 

Besides cuhural attrac- 
tions, students studying 
abroad get to experience 
the international party 
<lcene Both Morrell and Scruggs 
agreed that the nightlife abroad never 
sleeps 

"People here in the Caribbean 
party a lot In America, (whereas) 
most people only go out on Ihe 
weekends, people here have par- 
ties every night of the week, 
including the weekend. " Scruggs 
said. 

Britain's night scene revolves 
around pubs instead of parties 

"People here go pubbing which is 
equivalent to going to a bar." 
Morrell said However, pubbing is 
different in that it consists of hop- 
ping from pub to pub in one night 

"The party never slops here, 
whereas at home everything shuts 
down at two and you end up at 
Jerry's or Denny's." Morrell contin- 
ued, noting that the fraternity and 
sorority scene is replaced by "drink- 
ing societies" 

"Here there is always somewhere 
open ..so you can get your groove 
on. My feel were killing me but I 
would not trade that experience for 




the worM." 

Morrell said "One night in London, 
we literally clubbed until it was time 
for breakfast" 

Partying aside, spending the sum- 
mer abroad exposes students to vari- 
ous education experiences and cul- 
tural attractions. 

Morrell is studying at Pembroke 
College, a campus of Ihe University 
of Cambridge, for five weeks through 
UC Irvine s EAP 



"The city of Cambridge is very 
charming, but it also rains and is 
cold, which is something I am not 
used lo at home." Morrell said The 
program is open lo students who are 
at least 18 years old and enrolled full- 
lime al any university with good aca- 
demic standing. 

Morrell's courses include compar- 
ative literature, with an emphasis on 
magical-realism and post mod- 
ernism Morrell is also taking a 



MIW n CXtON/TMy Sfun ^cnot SuR 

course on the works of William 
Shakespeare 

Scruggs, who IS studying at the 
University of West Indies at 
Barbados through UCLA's EAP. is 
finding out on her trip that life in 
Barbados isn't about lying leisurely 
on the beach sipping drinks from a 







f itefte MorrHI, i fbyrth-y^ar 
theater student, is sliyiiii 
abroad at! 
University in I 



Monday. July 16 20()l 



DaiK' Bruin 



Djiny oruiit News 



Monday. July 16. 2001 5 



Internet service 
helps teachers 
detect incidents 
of plagiarism 

ONLINE: siiidciils will siihtiiil 
|ia(M'is lo Tiiriilthi.corii lor 
i('\ irw!)\ >nnuiir('. laciiIlN 

Bv Robert Salonga 

Ij.jiI', Brum Stdft 

.,i|iv,iu- Ji.'v.'l,ip.\l .11 I ( Ik-rkck'N lh.li 

,:ll,n'. I.KUil'- I" .L'U->.I Inlc-IIH.'! pl.lLM.I- 

11k 11)1 "<! v\ ulc^piL-.nl cictci-lion >i>ti- 
wM: .i\ .iil.ihk' > I uinlllii cimi. .in 
Itiu-iiic; M.-!\iv.i.' ih.ii tioss-rclcrcnccs the 
I'l.ipoi 111 i.|ui.'>ii<>n uiih mhcr >Xch mics .ind 
p.ipciN III il^ online dat.ib.isc which 
iiKic.i>cs in M/c with each paper submit- 
ted V\ herea> lacultN members used to 
i>pe .1 iengthv passage into a search engine 
to detect suspected cheating, the service 
can lind a case o( plagmrism based on a 
lew words 

We w.int lo put m rricasures that pre- 
\en! students from leeltng at a disadvan- 
tage lor not plagiari/mg. ' said Arlene 
Russell a senior I (LA lecturer in educa- 
tion chemisirs and biochcmistr\ 

Several I ( s h.ive licenses with 
lurnitln com. including Berkelev, Davis, 
Los Angeles. San Diego and Santa ( ru/. 
all ol which are in trial phases Other 
n.ilional c.impuses are currentK in the 
contracting process 

According to I C officials, at Davis. 
plagiarism cases doubled between IW4 
.ind :(KK) from ''U to 142. and cases at 
Berkelev increased between l')*>*^ and 
:(Ml| from '2 to 44 

At I ( Irvine, there were about 10(1 
cases during the 2(KK)-2()()I academic year 
■\dditionallv. the percentage ot Internet- 
related plagiarism has been on the rise in 

See 




hp AvMj< tdif^ l*fe'. 



Roger McGuinn, member of the Byrds, is at left. Lars Utridi, center, drummer of the rock band Metallica, talks with Napster CEO 
Hank Barry, right, during a U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on July 1 1 , 2000. 

Napster settles with Metallica, sti faces legal trouble 



MUSIC Sori^-swapping sen ice 
miLst stay offline until it perfects 
file-sharinp software, judge says 



By iMi Harris 

The Assotidted Press 

SAN FRANCISCO Napster escaped a legal 
mess when it settled a suit fikd by heavy metal 
band Metidlica. but the embattled song-swapping 
company still faces a federal judge's order 
demanding the .service remain ofl-line until it pre- 
vents all unauthorized song trading 

Napster requested an emergency stay of L S 
District Judge Marilyn Hall Palel's latest order 
pending appeal from the ^h I .S Circuit Court of 
Appeals 



Palel told Napster on July 1 1 lo stay olV-line 
until Its file-sharing software is perfected. Napster 
attorneys calkrd Palel's edict Irom the bench out 
of step with an earlier appeals court ruling 

"This draconian relief is p<irticularly unjust in 
light ol the liK-'t that Napster's newly implemenled 
filtering technologies have an error rate ot less 
than I percent." Napster's attorneys wrote in 
their request for an emergency stay lo Patel's 
order 

Napster CEO Hank Barry said his company 
would grudgingly play by the new rules 

"Napster will obey this order, its we have every 
order that the court has issued We believe the 
judge's order is inconsistent with the 9th Circuit s 
decision and wrong on a variety of other 
grounds' Barrv said 

Thursdiiy also brought an end to copyright 
infringement lawsuits tiled against Napster by 



Metallica and rap artist Dr Drc Financial terms 
of the settlement were not disclosed, but as pan of 
the agreement Metallica will allow aomc of the 
band's songs to be traded on Napster's system 
once a legal business model has been launched. 

■| think we've rcstilved this in a way that works 
for fans, recording artists and songwriters alike." 
said Lars Ulrich. Metallica s drummer. 

Napster has been olT-line since July 2. when the 
Redwmxl City-based company took down its 
computer servers after its upgraded audio finger- 
printing technology failed to catch all of the copy- 
right music being traded by online users 

Napster was ready to restart its service, claim- 
ing It had retooled the .screening st>ftware to bkick 
more than W percent of unauthorized sting files 

However. Judge Palel shot down the notion 
that Napster could quietly conK;back online with- 
out 100 percent etTectivenea». 




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WORLD & NATION 



MissHe test hopeful for U.S. defense 




EFFORT: Pcnlaptn finds 
success afler failed tries 
during (vlinlon's terms 



!W A,\iii iAirti t*^N. 

protests a ptanned missile defense system test July 
14 outside Vandenberg Air Force Base in Lompoc, Calif. 



By 

The Assoc Mted Press 

W.ASHINCJTON The 

Pentagon N succcsslul mi>Mlc delctisc 
lc»t bolsters President Bush's hopes 
for building at least a rudimenlars 
dctense against ballistic missile attack 
on the I nited Slulcb and its allies b\ 
2004 

The destruction of a nuvk \*ar- 
hcad in space by a missile interceptor 
launched Irom Kwaialetn Atoll in the 
Marshall Islands was an important 
step lor the Pentagon s missile 
detense eflorl. but must be Iblloued 
bv more successes m more trequent 
and more realistic tests. oiTicials said 

The success late in the night on Jul> 
14 lollowed two dramatic test failures 
during the Clinton administration 

"This lest IS just one on a journey, 
one stop on a journev.' ^Klld Air f-orce 
Lt Gen Ronald kadish. head ol the 
Pentagon s missile detense programs 
He held a news conference at the 
Pentagon less than an hour after the 
collision of the interceptor and its tar- 
get created a huge while flash in 
space 

"We will press on lo the next lest." 
he said. 

That test, scheduled for October, 
may include some additional com- 
plexities, such as extra decoys aboard 
the target missile In Saturday's test, 
just one decos was used 

A White House spokeswoman said 
the president was pleased with the 
re«ull. 



Election offidak adcnowledge proUems 



FLORIDA: Decisions over 
which votes would count 
were found inconsistent 



By 

The Associated Press 

TALLAHASSEE. Fla Florida 
elections supervisors on Sunday 
acknowledged discrepancies in how 
strict they were m deciding whether 
to accept overseas ballots m the 
presidential election 

But several supervisors denied 
Republicans pressured them to 



accept ballots from overseas mili- 
tary personnel likely favoring 
Cieorge W Bush 

The Nevk York Times reported 
July 15 that Republicans pressed 
election officials in CiOP-leaning 
counties to accept overseas absentee 
ballots that didn't comply with state 
election laws and sought to have 
overseas ballots disqualified in coun- 
ties won by A! Ciorc 

"This stor\ confirms our worst 
fears about the Bush team's cam- 
paign lo manipulate the Florida 
vole." said Democratic National 
Chairman Terry McAuliffe "It 
proves that President Bush was 



determined to win by any means 
necessary, including violating the 
spirit if not the actual letter ol the 
lavk " 

But in response to The Times 
story. White House spokesman .An 
Fleischer said This election was 
decided by the voters of Florida a 
long time ago And the nation, the 
president and all but the most parti- 
san Americans have moved on ' 

The Times published results of a 
six-month examination ol the 2.4*)() 
overseas ballots accepted after 
Election Dav It found 6K0 question- 
able votes, most of which lacked a 
required postmark 



WORLD ft NATION BRIEFS 



China and Russia seek 
to finalize pivotal treaty 

MOSCOW - China s President Jiang Zemin 
amved m Russia on July 1 5 to cement the 'strate- 
gic partnership'" between former Communist 
nvMk with a pivotal friendship ireiily the Tinit in 
more than S<) years 

The treaty Jiang and Russian President 
Vladimir Putm are expected to sign after talks in 
the Kremlin on July 16 will be the first such dtx;- 
ument since I9S0 

"The fnendship and cooperation treaty which 
I am foing lo sign with President Putin has a his- 
toric importance. ' Jiang said m statement dis- 
tributed after hts arrival on the four-<lay visit 'It 
will lay a firm foundation lex long-term, healthy 
and slaUe development oTChincoe-Rusnan rela- 
tions in the new century " 

Jaing's visit follows the International Olympic 
Comminee'i dsciMon July 13 lo give Beijmf the 
3IIIQiyinpic Games -^ seen by Oima as a nod of 
recogmtion for lU sutusasa world power. 



Putin had already sent Jiang a 
telegram of congratulation "It s sym- 
bolic that such an imponant decision 
was made in M*>scow just before the hiv 
tone visit." the Ruisian president said. 



U.N. conference will try 
to salvage Kyoto treaty 

BERLIN A UN conference on global 
warming faces a tough task in trying to rescue a 
1997 pact to curt) poNutmn after the United 
States abandoned it as harmful to its economy 

Delegates from some I KO countries were gaih- 
enng July 16 in Bonn. Germany, for a new round 
of bargaining over the treaty, which is meant to 
ciimbat climate changes that many scientisLs fear 
will wreak havoc on the Earth 

EuMpnn nat ions have pledged to pMh aheHd 
with is wcaHed Kyoto Protocol wiiMHt Mk 
United Smm. wying it could )om later But 
reoeniK Japnn. which could sink the accord if it 
wMlidraws support, has aho begun to waver 





ft»- Assoi <4Im!>'" 



Poonam Goswami hopes the summit meeting will lead to the 
release of her husband who was captured by the Pakistani army. 

Indian, Pakistani leaders 
initiate formal discussion 



ISSUES: Ri\al nations' 
topics of talks inchided 
nuclear risk reduction 



By 

The Associated Press 

AGRA. India Despite more 

cross-border firing b> their sifldiers m 
Kashmir, the leaders of bitter rivals 
India and Pakistan pursued peace 
and nuclear security during their first 
formal talks in more than two years 
on July 15 

They also agreed to tiKCt again 
sixw 

With the white m;irt>le domes of 
the laj Mahal a symbolic biickdrop 
to their landmark summit. Pakistan 
President Cien Perve/ Musharral 
and Indian Prime Minister Atal 
Bihan Vajpayee met for talks that 
appeared to have gone better than 
anyone had expected 

F ven as the\ discussed peace, their 
forces exchanged gun fire acri>ss the 
border dividing disputed Kashmir 
lor a second straight day. the first 
such flare-up this year Fighting 
between stildiers and Islamic sepa- 
ratists krft 20 peopk- dead otVicials 
said, raising the weekend loll io 44 

The dispute over the Himalayan 
region has ignited two ol the natu»ns 
three wars the last in 1^71 With 
India and Pakistan now touting 



nuclear v^eapons. it is MideK feared 
Ka.shmir ci>uld become the IikUs ol a 
wider conllict 

One highlight of the leaders mtxt- 
ing was agreement to keep talking 
Vajpayee accepted an invitation from 
Musharraf to mmi Islamabad. otTi- 
cials siiid rhe\ al.so decided to meet 
on the sidelines of the IN (ieneral 
Assembly in September 

"This reflects the mivxl from b<ith 
sides to res<ilve the issues, said 
Pakistan's information secretary. 
Anwar Mahmotxl 

Though only 20 minutes ol private 
talks had been planned. the> spoke 
one-on-one for nearly twii hours at 
the Jaypcc Palace hold in Agra. 1 10 
miles southeast of the Indian capital 

They talked through a working 
lunch of soupts. kebabs and Indian 
dishes, and again lor several hours 
before a perlbrmarKe of Indian clas- 
sical music and a dinner banquet 
Delegates and ( abinet ministers sat 
in on .some of the sessu>ns 

Musharraf also tcH>k a break lo 
visit the Taj Mahal with his wife. 
Sehba Erected b\ Muslim Moguls 
who once ruled nu>st of the subconti- 
nent, the Taj is symbtJic of the com- 
mon history shared by Pakistan and 
India Musharraf is in India for three 
days 

"A number ol issues were thrashed 
out These included the issue of 
nuclear risk reduction. " s<iid Sushma 
Swaraj. India's information minister 



The accord commits rich countries 
to cutting emissions ol s«vcalled 
greenhouse ga.ses. especialK carbon 
dioxide from cars, factories and power 
stations Contentious rules lor achieving 
those goals. ht>wever. were left open at the 
Kyoto. Japan, meeting in 1997 

The last talks bri>kc up last November 
President Bush renounced the Kyoto pact in 
March, saying it was based on questionable sci- 
ence and unfair because it exempts big devek>p- 
ing countries like China and India 

U.N and European ofTicials. as well as env>- 
fonmental groups, have reacted with frustration 
or outright anger 

°'We can't let the country with the biggest 
emissions of greenhouse gases escape responsh 
biliiy for protecting the gkibal climate.' (ierman 
Environment Minister Juergen Trittin said 
recently 

Thousands of protesters are expected lo con- 
verge on the qurt city on the Rhme for the two- 
wcdt conference, and Bonn police sav they are 
prqtared for violence 



Israeli minister meets 
with Arafat talks peace 

CAIRO. Egypt Israeli Fomgn Minister 
Shimon Peres met Yasser Arafat here July 15. 
aiming to heal what he called "poisoned" rela- 
tions and saying Israel doesn't intend a major 
military assault against the Palestinian leader 

Peres said he and Arafat discussed how to 
implement a ceaae-firc that was called on Juik I "^ 
but has been marred by persistent clashes and 
killings 

"I'm leaving Cairo with the sense that there is 
hope." Peres said after more than an hour of 
talks, which folbws an unproductive meeting 
between the two in Portugal two weeks ago 

Arafat returned to the Palestinian territories 
without speaking to reporters 

E.arlicr, Ante and Peres met separateh with 
Egyptian Pmiient Hosni Mubarak 

"We don't have any intention whatsoever, nei- 
ther to have a ground attack or to attack Arafat 
or expel Aralat. Peres said 



Mondav, litl\ 16, 2(H)| 



Daily Brum News 



DaiK' Bruin 



Monday. July 16 2001 



STATE & LOCAL 



Companies race to produce stem eels 



RESEARCH: Methods (jf 
prodiicin^ crnhniKs dri^v^ 
crllicisr!) from opixmcnts 



By Paul Elias 

The Associated Press 

Ml \l()l'\Rk t alil Ailc.isi 
ihrcL' lur-prorn oonipanics arc racing 
111 dcscK)p large .imountN ot cnibr\- 
Kiiic stem cells even as President 
Bush Niruggles to decide whether ttw 
ginernniem should pui up road- 
block n to such research 

1 he stem celK hold the potential to 
cure dise.ises and ailnicni> from can- 
cel lo spinal cord iniuries It this 
dream can be realized, these cimipa- 
nicv stand to reap riiiillion> it m>l bil- 
lions in profits "^ 

1 ach i.ompan\ eniplo>s dillerent 
hu! still controversi.il techniques lo 
harvest enibrvonic stem cells One 
bu\^ leltover enibr\os tri'ni lertilitv 
clinics Another is vk(>rking to create 
emhrvos b\ v\a\ ol a cloning methinJ 
similar to the one used to make DolK 
(he sheep The third pass men and 
women lor their sperm and eggs 
then creates embryos in the laboraio^ 
r\ 

lach company s research involves 
plucking the coveted stem c^ls trom 
4- or ^-day-old human embryos. 
v^hich musi be destroyed m the 
process 

Atiti-abortion activists and others 
consider all three techniques unethi- 
cal, saying thev resuh in the. destruc- 
tion ol human lile 



Proponcnts ot such research 
argue that these days-old, undilleren- 
tiated cells cannot he viewed as 
human, and they stress that they have 
no inlentu<n ol implanting them in a 
womb and producmg babies 

Since IWh lederal law has 
Kinned the use oi tax dollars lor 
research that destroys embryos 

Ihe Clinton administration decid- 
ed lederal money could pay lor 
research a> long as the stem cells 
were extracted with private mtmey 

Bush, whti has cH)mc under pres- 
sure to reverse the Clinton policy and 
disallow any lederal money lor 
human embryonic stem cell research, 
appears to he searching lor a com- 
promise possibly adopting a middle 
ground that imposes new restrictions 
but allows the research \o move for- 
ward 

The work will go on one way or 
another, said Thomas Okarma. 
chiel executive ol Menio Park -based 
Ciert>n Inc which lunded the two 
scientists who first isolated human 
stem cells in 1^8 and still dominates 
the field 

(leron buys leltovcr Irozen 
embrym Irom fertility clinics and 
, opens them to obtain Ihe stem cells 
Cieron owns the worldwide rights to 
this priKCss and has filed about 3U 
new patent applications for the vari- 
ous techniques and technology it 
uses 

Chiel executive Thomas Okarma 
siiid he considers Cieron s technique 
ethically sound 

"These things aren t people." he 
siiid "I'hcse are all tnuev excess and 



no longer needed by the couple .And 
they are either going to be thrown 
away or .stored torevcr " 

Fveniually. Cjeron hopes to get 
stem cells without having lo use 
embryos at all It ht>pes to do this by 
finding aiKJ cloning the proteins in 
eggs that lead li> the creation ol stem 
cells Then. Okarma said, "living 
cells will he tomorrows pharmaceu- 
ticals " 

Across ihe country in Worcester. 
Mitss , Advanced Cell Technok)gy is 
working on another technique that it 
hopes will enable it to generate siem 
cells by growing human embryos 
without the u.se of sperm 

Advanced ( ell s plan is lo pay 
women to take lertility drugs to prtv 
duce excess eggs 

Researchers would then take an 
egg. remove Us nucleus and genetic 
material and fuse it with a skin cell 
containing adult genetic material 
With a jolt ol electricily. the 
researchers then would coax the egg 
to replicate as il it had been lertili/ed 
with sperm Alter a lew days, siem 
cells would be ready lor harvesting 

So tar. Advanced C ell has yet lo 
obtain a stem cell with this technique 
Chiel executive Michael West, a 
Cieron cu-lounder who left for 
Advanced Cell last year, said the 
company has not yet created 
embryos 

Many scientists consider the 
results ol Advanced C ells technique 
to be human embryos, since theoreti- 
cally, they could be implanted into a 
womb and grown into a letus West 
himseit ha.s used the term "embrvo " 



Unapproved budget leads 
Controller tp s^ 



EMPLOYEES: Gov. Davis' 
office (Titicizes Connell 
for 'publicity stunt' 



ByJii 

The Associated Ptpss 

SAC RAMtNTO - Stale 
Controller Kathleen Connell can- 
celed a $2 million payroll July 1.^ lor 
2.(M)0 legislative employees as the 
stale budget stalemate reached its 
nth day 

Checks also slop next week lor 
vendors who do business with the 
state. Connell said Legislators, 
unable to pass a budget by a July 
Ideadhne. will have their pay 
stopped on July ^1 The governor and 
other elected stale olTicers. including 
CcMUieH. will also find themselves 
diK'ked at the end of the month 

Connell said state law prevents her 
from writing payroll checks lo these 
groups without a state budget 
Legislative stafTers are paid twice a 
month while the governor and legis- 
lators are paid monthly 

"Each day the budget stalemate 
continues, more people, businesses 
and ItKal programs are affected." 
Connell said 

July 1.^ marked the fourth time 
since 1*^5 that C onnell has withheld 
employee checks over a budget show- 
down The legislature has passed 



only three budgets by July I since 
IW() 

At least 262.0000 state employees 
will contmuc to be paid 

Cjov Gray Davis, who signed the 
first two budgets of his administra- 
tion on time, attacked Connell's 
announcement as a "publicity stunt." 

Davis spokesman Steve Maviglio 
said. "It's unfortunate that the slate 
controller wants to create a sideshow 
when she should be helping the gov- 
ernor and the Legislature conte to 
agreement on a budget " 

A Republican legislative mmortty. 
opposing a planned quarter-cent 
sales tax hike this January, is block- 
ing the budget m the slate Assembly 
and Senate The tax adopted in IWl 
goes into elTect automatically when 
state revenues fall Republicans want 
lo ax the tax hike permanently 

DemiKrats say it will raise S 1.8 bil- 
lion desperately needed during the 
next two years li the Konomy contin- 
ues to slow, ttt" 

Despite the standoff. Assembly 
Speaker Robert Hertzberg. D-Van 
Nuys. scheduled a session on the 
budget for 4 p.m July 14 

Jamie Fisfis. spokesman for 
Assembly Republicans, scoffed at 
Herizbergs plan, saying, "The 
speaker's going to put us through a 
bunch of budget drills We'd be bet- 
ter ofl' negotiating." 

The Senate is off until 3 p.m. July 
16 



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PLAGIARISM 

From pag^ 4 

recent years. 

Tve even seen plagiarism in 
ethics courses." Russell said 

Turnltln com was originulK 
known as Plagiarism org m IW5 It 
was created b> John Barne. a doc- 
toral student at VC Berkelc>. who 
found that students were plagiariz- 
ing from papers posted on the class 
Web site 

Barrie created a program that 
would match papers with those prc- 
viousK submitted, and eventually 
expanded it to online term paper 
sites, which sell other studenl^ 
works 

Jeanne Wilson, director of stu- 
dent judicial affairs at Davis, said 
the huge database of Turnltln.com 
makes it less economical for term 
paper sites to do business, since 
their material IS cventualK found bv 
or added to the detection database 

To use Turnltln com. students 
must upload papers directly to the 
Web site, at which point the papers 
undergo the detection prcKess The 
service then creates an originality 
report, which highlights instances of 
possible plagiarism or incorrect cit- 
ing 

Students can revise their papers 
for a period of 24 hours following 
the initial submission After this 



point. It IS considered a final draft 
ready for critical review by the priv 
fessor wh«) is the only one with 
access to the papers 

Before the inception of Web- 
related detection services, faculty 
members used their intuition to sus- 
pect plagiarism, according to 
Wayne ("reager. a case administra- 
tor at lie Berkeley who handler pla- 
giarism issues for the university. 

Professors often looked for 
unique language aod terms that 
seem out of place. 

"If a student doing ("-level work 
suddenly turns in a brilliant A paper. 
It's an indication that something sus-^ 
pect IS possibly going on." Creager 
said 

Despite the benefits of the service 
in delecting possible plagiarism, 
whether or not the student is 
accused has always rested in the 
hands of the profess«»r. : ^ 

■professors have the final discre- 
tion." said Ocager "The .service 
isn't telling us what to do." 

Robert Newsomc. asstKiate deair 
of undergraduate education at 
Irvine, emphasi/ed the service's 
value as being more preventative 
than anything else 

"Our goal IS not to catch people, 
but to dissuade students that this is 
not the right thing to do." New.some 
said "If students are av^are that a 
program is in place, they're much 
less likely to do it " 



BOARD 

From pjgf 1 

speaking of Ward 

Ward said he was opposed to an 
audit at this point, because he 
wants take time to ensure tluit the 
audit prinluces u valuable docu- 
ment that can be used in future 
years He said of his performance 
la.st year "Somehow I got results ' 

Typically, the communication 
board's executive committee, of 
which Alger was a member, gives a 
review of Ward s performance 
yearly. 

But according to many board 
members, they rely heavily on diK- 
uments produced by Ward to do 
that review The audit would prtv 
vide board members w ith addition- 
al dtuumentation necessary to give 
a more comprehensive review ol 
Wind's performance. noRW b*Hird 
members said 

But Alger said a vote for the 
audit was not a "vote of non-confi- 
dencc m Arvli " 

Caufield agreed, stressing that 
all of student media, not jusl Ward, 
would be reviewed by the audit 

"This is not about Arvh." he 
said "This IS abt)Ul studeni media 
and how we can tweak it and super- 
tune it." 

The proposal involved approv- 
ing funding for Deloitte and 



Touche an accounting, tax and 
consuhing firm - lo perform an 
eight-week audit of studcni media, 
which Alger called an "excellent 
opportunity to evaluate the depart- 
ment ■■ 

But others did not like the idea 
or at least were not willing to 
approve funding yet 

Prolessumal representative 
Norm Patti/. who attended the 
meeting via a trans-Atlantic tele- 
phone call, said he was hearing 
about the audit for the first time 
and he was not prepared to vote for 
Its funding 

Others questioned the timing of 
the audit 

All said he d rather an audit be 
performed during the school year, 
when studeni media is 'm full 
swing ' 

But Alger would have preferred 
the audit happen during the sum- 
mer 

"My entire goal was to wrap this 
up before schtH>l started." he said 
"The Bruin's publishing once a 
week instead of every day We 
wouldn't be in the spotlight "" 

Alger and three other board 
members voted not to table the 
audit, and alter it was tabled. Alger 
resigned as a member of the execu- 
tive committee, saying he did not 
want lo ci>mplete the review of 
Ward without the outside audit 

Student member Brcana 



Teubner. also a member of the 
executive committee, expressed 
concern about putting her name on 
a report reviewing Ward without 
out.side help 

"I personally dt) not have the 
professional ability I want this to 
be done in a fair way." she said "I 
don't feel comfortable putting my 
name on something like that, 
because I don't think it would be 
professional ' 

Ward meanwhile said there is an 
alternative process to completing 
his review and added that he stands 
ready lo produce "documentation 
and evidence" that would help the 
communications board m accu* 
rately completing his review 

After ( aufield made it known to 
the board that some members" 
terms were expired, administrative 
board member Pam Viele put forth 
a resiilution to view the tabling of 
the audit and the upcoming review 
of media personnel by the execu- 
tive committee as a continuation of 
last year s business, which could 
therefore be done by last year"s 
board members. 

But w hen it came time to vote on 
V iele'> resolution, there was confu- 
sion over who could or could not 
vote, since some member's terms 
had technically pas.sed 

Ward said that for the last few 



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l!;vUMd ihc l< H nuiskli'i^ .1 c.m- 
clij.iic ^ motu.iiuMi li>r cnlcrmi.' .i 
h.vl i!^ !iili,i-<liu..tiirc political and 
f^uhlu Mipp'Tl llic L'iniroiimcm.il 
imp.Ki iIk' iiamcN would have, hiuv 
the cit\ wiuilif linaruc the uanu-N. 
and how capable the v.'il\ wmikl be in 
h.'viinij the ii.imcs 

M.iin applauded the l()( n 
.i..iii'n ^.lvlnl: that ( hina s time h.iN 
^.'itie 

I think China is an apprDpnale 



hi«si loi iheOlMiipiLs. ' Niiid Richard 
Baum .1 I (I A political Mience 
pinteNX'i whu>c .irca o\ expertise is 
II) economie and political reform in 
po>i-V1ao China 

Seven to eight veatN .igo \ihen 
the were a t.indid.ite. I wa> not sup- 
portive because it was shortK alter 
the I l4S'»i liananmen Square inci- 
dent Baum said noting that ne*s 
ol ih.ii inculeni lelt a si)ur taste in his 
month Bui since IW^ China has 
made enormous strides in impros- 
iiiL' lis human rights " 

Bjutini! came close to winning the 
bid lor the 200(1 Summei Olympic 
Ciames. though the cit\ lost in the 
linal round ol voting to Svdnev. 
•Xustralia 

Ihiv veai N \iclorv uill nt»t onl\ 
bring ( hin.i more attention but 
ci>uld be the catalyst tor sweeping 
improvements in the country. 
.icci>idmi' to some 

It will open China up. and thev 
will ^.U^ .1 lot ol things to improve 
then mtr.istriicture ' Schult/ said 

C hill.: plans on providing '^ new 
venues lor the 2(K)K Summer 
( Hvmpics m addition to 40(1 nev* bus 
roiiies 

Vlanv agreed that the watchlul 
eve ot the international community 
could force China to change tor the 
better 

Ihevll be under world scrutinv 
so httpetulh their human rights and 
environmental record vmH improve 
and ( hina \mI1 he a much better 
ciHinlrv all the way around because 
ol It. Schult/ said 

With reports from Scott Schultz and 
Cuauhtemoc Ortega Daily Brum 
Senior Staff 



ABROAD 

From page 3 

ci»c;«>nut 

Instead, she is taking an .African 
American history course, as well as 
a Barbados history ci>urse. wrth an 
emphasis on their British 
( timmonwealth system While the 
classes are not directly alTiliated 
with Scruggs major course ol study, 
she will receive 10 .*» upper division 
units from the courses 

Students in the programs find 
they must balance academics and 
travel in a short perunl of time 

Luckily. Scruggs found that her 
professors. wh(> are from I ( 
Berkeley and CWI-Barbados. were 
sympathetic to the experience 

■ 1 he proless»)rs are lenient as far 
as our readings are concerned, and 
we have tutorials for each o\ our 
classes one day u week." Scruggs 
said 

■ I"hey even cut out the whole last 
week ot class because of the annual 
Bajan celebration called the Crop 
f )ver I estival." she continued 

Weeks of dancing, dramatic pro- 
ductions upon floats and Calypso 
music lead up to the coronation o\ 
the king and queen of the i alypso 

The vacation-like atmosphere 
experienced by many students 
abroad during the summer dtx'sn't 
dimmish the competitive instincts 
of some college students, as Morrell 
found out 

I haven t studied with British 
students, but the Americans in my 
program are competitive enough 
for me." she said 

Students accustomed to the US 



diet must also assimilate to their 
new cuhnary environments 

While meals prepared in dorm 
cafeterias are dreaded by many stu- 
dents. Morrell found out that the 
international dining scene can be 
equally unappeti/ing 

"In Scotland, they deep fry 
everything. I ve seen deep fried 
sausages, deep fried hamburger 
meat patties its totally gross." 
Morrell said Apart from the requi- 
site fish and chips which Morrell 
highly recommends, students study- 
ing in Britain can sample delicacies 
such as baked ptUaliK's filled with 
baked beans. 

Concern for cholesterol aside, 
mayonnaise is an extremely popular 
condiment, topping everything 
from bread to potato chips 

But Morrell did enjoy other 
Briti.sh dining habits 

"You can drink tea any time of 
the day with any meal, and nobtnly 
thiakk yuu are strange." said 
Morrell. who appreciated the fact 
that British «afes and restaurants 
serve both white and brown sugar at 
their tables 

For Scruggs, the high c«>st of 
fotxl m Barbados makes it difficult 
ti^ enjoy snacks and treats, despite 
an exchange rale of 2 Bajan dollars 
for every one I .S dollar 

"A bag of Skittles may cost $ Wl 
m the C S . but it costs S4 50 lo buy 
two bags here in Bajan dollars." 

Students who do not like the 
dorm food in Barbados can expect 
to spend up lOU IS di>llars on grtv 
cenes lor what would cost S4.^ in the 
states. Scruggs s;iid 

Although some students may not 
like' the food, room and btvard 



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accommodatK>ns abroad are much 
mtirc pi>pular 

UCL.A s dormitories nften pack 
up to three people in a rtwm. but in 
( ambridge. Morrell experienced 
the luxury of having her own riH)m 

"We all live in single dormitories 
- there are no shared rooms My 
r«)om IS absolu4ely huge, larger than 
any IX'LA dorm could ever dream 
to be.' Morrell said. 

Students studying abrnsd^ frng hi 
encounter anti-American feelings 

"I was told that in LA all we do 
IS gung-bang and drive-by shinit 
ings." Morrell said Tve been told 
that American women are silly, and 
that were sluts " 

Living and studying in Barbados 
has also opened Scruggs' eyes to the 
societal differences between the 
island and the Lniled States 

As far as interaction between 
men and women is concerned. 
Bujan attitudes differ greatly from 
their American counterparts 
5»cruggs observed that men tend to 
be more direct with their flirting 
than .Americans, while many resi- 
dents tend to be wary of f(»reigners 

"I'm pretty noticeably American 
here, even though my skin color is 
about the same as the Bajan pe«v 
pie. " Scruggs said "We get smiled 
at. whistled at and approached by 
the men. but women give us nasty 
stares and bad attitudes " 

Despite cultural difTerences and 
the lack of certain comforts of 
home, studying abroad can kc 4M 
unforgettable experience. 

"It has been great to see how 
another side of the world lives, and 
It can really change your perspec- 
tive on life." Morrell said. 





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Monday. . July 16. 2(MH 9 



BOARD 

From page 7 

years, board members have served 
from August I to August I oi the 
next year, because that is the 
board's lisc.ii year The clause in the 
constitution that says new members 
must take their seats by the end o\' 
spring quarter is left o\er-fri»m the 
time when the fiscal year ran from 
June 1 to June I 

But btiard members insisted »>n 
playing by the rules 

Board member Mike Kline rec- 
ommended the board take its prob- 
lem to the university, sayipg the 
board was experiencing a "ct'nstitu- 
tional crisis *" 

But Alger said that was wasn't 
necessary. ■ 'i ." 

I don't think that's i^||NNi|NWle 
at all." Alger said 

Alger said going to the university 
could hurl the autonomy of student 
media 

The board is scheduled to meet 
again Wednesday. July 25. 
Members whose terms have not 
expired provided it meets quorum 
- will consider electing a new chair 
and vice-chair. assigning board 
members to the executive and oper- 
ational committees and possibly 
voting on the tabled audit proposal 

Board members were not sure 
whether I SAC the gr(»up respon- 
sible for undergraduate communi- 
cations board appointments 
would have .ippomtments done by 
the next meeting 

(iSA ^ responsible for graduate 
c(»tnmunications board appoint- 
ments has already appointed its 
one new board member. 



ENRON 

Fifom page 1 

The energy crisis has led the 
state to subsidize the utilities oper- 
ation to ensure the state is pow- 
ered Enron's transfer of service to 
those utilities was seen by the attor- 
ney general as placing additional 
weight on the state budget 

The contracts that Pnron had 
entered into with the I C . C'SL and 
others were contracts that required 
them to provide power at a rale sig- 
nificantly less than what they were 
selling It for at the market price." 
Barankin said "By trying to renege 
on their contract tnron was hop- 
ing to make enormous profits at the 
(expense) of taxpayers" 

Despite the legal wrangling and 
small monetary losses caused by 
the switch, each side was satisfied 
with the agreement which will keep 
VC paying for an additional two 
years. 

"It was just a win-win for every- 
body." said Ken Swisher. CSl' 
media relations manager 



UPTE 

From page 1 



university's inaccessibility 

"The mam obstacle was the VC 
held onto the money as if it were 
theirs . and the university's 
stalling tactics at the table."' said 
(liff Freed, vice president ol the 
liKal UPTF chapter 

The union said negi>tialions 
were further inhibited by late or 
non-present university representa- 
tives at meetings Mc Alpin said 
she was not aware of the problem 
ind that relations between the two 
piirties are stn»ng 

"I'm not going to go down thai 
road, she said' We sliould lusl 
keep up g(H>d relations rather than 
pointing fingers '" 

Intil the new contract is 
.ipproved by members in a secret 
ballot meeting, the old contract will 
remain in effect 




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Daily Bruin 



Daily Bruin 



Monday, July 16, 2001 11 



oint 



;tfi<l umisiial 



Next week, a columnist looks at 
ji Wis( onsin case in which a man 
was ordered not to procreate 
until he repays his debts. 

vtewpotnt#Tnedia.ucla.edu 



EDITORIAL 



LGBT issues need to 
be discussed in class 



The (JccisKiii b\ the natums 
largCNl teachers union to aban- 
don a propt)sal to include lev 
bian ga> bisevual and iransgender 
ivNUCN in the national curriculum i> a 
>lap in the tacc lo the ideals ol equalit> 
liuighi lor since the days ol Brown v 
Board i>t hducation 

At itN national convention in Los 
•\ngeles the National Education 
\NNOCi.iiii>n was pressured b\ the 
,inti-homoscxualil\ sentiments ol 
nun\ \mcrican>. 

represented b\ the ^^,^^_^___ 
('(HI proiester> prc- 
scnt mil' aban- 
doning the pn>- 
pos.ii tor a task 
force to address 
thi> Issue IhK is 
simpK noi 
enough 

B\ choosing .1 

\M.\tk .ilternativc 

ihc Sf A IS acknowledging and giv- 
ing credibilitv ti> protesters belief 
lli.it .iddrcssing homose\u.ilitv in 
schools IS v^ri>ng 

I'.irti^ularlv problematic is the wav 
dclerniig to a task force c(»ntirms the 
Ic.ir ol some opponents that dis- 
LUssiiig homosevualitv m the class- 
room ma\ be a v^.iv of promoting" it 
on Lainpuses 

I (iBI people have .ilre.idv been 
(tcnicd lights other members o\ soci- 
e!\ eiMov. such as the right to marrv 
oi openK serve in the milil.irv 

hisi because a large segment of the 
piipul.iiiviii Is .iverse l(> homose\uali- 
i\ .IS ihcv once were to r.tcial iniegra- 
iioti ,ind women in the workplace, 
lioes not iiistifv Ignoring concerns ol 
the I (iBI communitv 

ihc l.(iBI curriculum is primarilv 
.limed ,ii serving the needs of mem 
hers dI lis own communitv and edu 
v.iiir.L' the publiv .is .i whole not 
seeking lo undermine those who are 
hetciosevual. although people of all 
scMi.il orient. itions would benefit 



The LGBT curriculum 

would provide a very 

important civic lesson: 

tolerance. 



from this education 

tducation should be about more 
than basic academic skills One of the 
most important aspects ol being an 
educated person is learning lo be 
part ot the community. 

It a pers<»n cannot interact with 
others, he or she is at a serious social 
disadvantage The L(iBT curriculum 
would provide a verv important civic 
lesson tt)lerance 

It IS dilticult to be a child or 

teenager these 
_______^^_^^ davs. cspeciallv 

with the peer 
and academic 
pressure that is 
characteristic 
ol schools But 
It IS even more 
dilTicult to 
belong to the 

LCiBTcommu 

nitv. because 
aside Irom dealing with ordmarv 
school-dav conflicts, students must 
also tackle the extraordinarily confuv 
ing subject of their identities 

And why wouldn t thev be con- 
tused ' Millions of Americans think 
homt»sexuality is wrong This is why 
honu>sexuals have become the target 
ol hate crimes and are prone lo div 
crimination at every age 

In schools this discriminatmn is 
so prevalent that it is second nature 
It is in this environment where these 
issues must be addressed Where else 
is calling someone ' gav or a "fag' 
commi>nplace but in scho<»ls. where 
students don I know how damaging 
those words can be' 

A successful incorporation of cdu- 
c.ilional restnirces about, and for. the 
I CiB I communitv at all levels of the 
American educational system has not 
occurred And even though some. 
like the NFA's task force, are making 
efforts to correct this, the seriousness 
with which they are taken has so far 
been inadequate 



Rn editor from the Daily Bruin 
shares his eMperience 

H.iu- vou ever had .i sir.inge day ' I know I just did 
li started oft with my usual trip lo the parking kiosk adjacent Lot X I 
.iskcd the parking services attendant for help, and instead of the usual. 

\\ hich lot sir 'I was told there was specific parking for construction work- 
ers 

I m ni>t a construction worker I m a student a Chicano student 
Liter that day I ran into an old acquaintance who had quite a few reserva- 
tions about my being an editor at the Daily Brum She lectured me on the 
consequences of selling out' and reprimanded me lor being seduced by the 
mainstream' instead of being more active in my own community 

Vlaybe it was lust the tact that both things happened on the same day that 
made it strange or maybe it was the ability of both people to predetermine 
nu intentions ,ind ch.ir.icter 

CiMulitMiM 0n«9a 
Vimrpoint Editor 




Appeasing China is not best US policy 




TRADE: Countn has no 
reason to end abuses if 
it ^ets ta\()rable status 

Trade can't buy the L S hap- 
piness and the liberal idea 
that "appeasement is the 
best policy "' is simply false 

If the I S admits China to the 
World Trade Organization, as 
expected, 
antagonism 
will not 
cease China 
will also have 
less of an 
incentive lo 
stop human 
rights abuses 
if granted 
"Most 
f-avored 
Nation" sta- 
tus 

Lowering 
trade barriers and tarilYs in an 
eflort to appease China will not 
instantly make it come around to 
the dcm(KTalic system Opening 
all L.S markets to China will 
endanger the L S economy And 
by allowing entrance to the WTO. 
the I S will be funding Chinas 
already-impi>sing war machine, 
which IS gearing for aggressive 
action toward Taiwan and eventu- 
ally the US 

The WTO's purpose is to "over- 
see trade agreements, enforce 
trade rules, and settle disputes" 
(New York Times Almanac 20(X). 
517) There arc currently 141 
nations m the WTO. with China as 
the only major trading nation 
excluded (www wto.org) 

Ciaining MFN status in the 
W TO means that no nation can be 

Shapiro is a nKond-yeaT pi>ilosophy 
student bnngmg reason to the ntass- 
«. E-mail him at FruTT>f iddle«*aol.com. 



given prrfcrentiat trading c(»ndi- 
tions. and '°di.scriminatory" trad- 
ing status cannot befall your coun- 
try 

The L.S decision regarding 
China IS extremely important. 
symKtlically and practically 
Symbt>lically. China's ascent to the 
WTO would signal u willingness 
on the part of the L S to .iccept 
China s widespread human rights 
abuses .ind its increasing antag(v 
nism toward the L S 

China remains one of the 
world's foremi>st human rights 
.ibusers Its justice system is still 
one oi the most brutal on the face 
of the planet, and China s supprev 
sion of free speech is a hallmark of 
the oppressive communist nation 
A New York Times article states. 
"Without more uniform enforce- 
ment of the law and in the 
absence of institutions like a free 
press and a strong judiciary, the 
country continues to rule most of 
Us people in the same brutal way it 
has for centuries" ("China Justice 
Swift Passage to Execution." New 
York Times. June l<>) 

According to the same article, 
in China 68 types of crimes are 
punishable by the death penalty, 
including such nonviolent crimes 
as tax fraud, embezzlement and 
accepting bribes of over $12,000. 
By allowing China to enter the 
WTO and gam MFN status, the 
L S shows Its acceptance of 
China s horrific human rights poli- 
cies 

Any eflort toward the appease- 
ment of China would only signal 
the U.S s weakness to China 

China has already impiemenled 
a policy of calculated antagonism 
against the L.S The debacle con- 
cerning the L S surveillance air- 
craft colliding with a Chinese jet is 
the best example of such antago- 
nism 

First, the Chinese government 
refused to return the L' S airmen 



onboard ttie surveillance plane 
Second, they demanded an apokv 
gy from the U.S. government 
despite the fact that the Chinese 
jet had struck the LIS plane. 
; Third, they refused the return 
of the damaged aircraft Finally, 
after returning the aircraft, they 
sent u SI million bill to the US 
for "expenses related to the crip- 
pled Navy EP-.T surveillancT plane 
held on Hainan Island for three 
months" ("Li.S considering $1 
million China bill for pianc." 
Reuters. July 10) 

If China has the utter gall to 
make such ridiculous demands, 
the US cannot just give way to its 
desire for WTO membership 
How could such a move be seen as 
anything other than L S weak- 
ness'' 

Opening I' S markets to China 
via the WTO would also endanger 
our domestic economy 

One of the major problems with 
Chinas accession to the WTO is 
their insistence on subsidizing 
their farmers at an extremely high 
level China recently compr(v 
mised on their level of subsidy, but 
the compromise still allowed 
China to subsidize farmers at an 
8.5 percent clip ("Endgame in 
China Bid For Entry To WTO." 
New York Times. June 28) 
. This level is just below what is 
allowed in developing countries II 
the Li.S opened its agricultural 
market to Chmese products, 
cheaper Chinese produce would 
undercut domestic farmers whose 
jobs are already in danger due to 
the influx of Mexican and 
Canadian produce 

Anolker major difficulty with 
granting China MFN status is that 
America already runs an enor- 
mous trade deficit with China In 
2000. the US ran a trade dencil 
of S83.8 billion, a figure which had 



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''--'■."^.' 




CDuM use bask cable rebirth 




SHOWS: Deluge of channels 
doesn't make up for lack of 
quality; old TV is still best 

Fifty years ago. mothers and 
alarmists everywhere thought tele- 
vision would descend upon young 
American minds like brain-eating bacte- 
ria, stripping their kids of independent 
thought and Cold War common sense I 
hear Allen Ginsburg 
originally began 
"Howl." "I have 
seen the greatest 
minds of my genera- 
tion destroyed by 
the Flintstones " 

Their fears may 
have been justified 
But all that ridicu- 
lous "kill your tele- 
vision" creepiness is 
futile at this point 
Besides. TV is pret- ————^^— 
ty amazing, and I 

love it-just as much as every other musb- 
brained Anterican consumer zombie. 

But there is troubkr brewing in TV 
land While our grandmothers wrung 
their hands over possibly IQ-sapping prcv 
grams, our mothers now have nutrc than 
285 channels to disapprove of - and 1 
share some ot their apprehension 

Basic cable opened up new worlds of 
existential delight to isolated suburbanites 
CNN IS a great leveler. making informa- 
tion acct»sible to all on a 24-hour basis 
Nickelodeon created "Ren and Stimp>. " 
an important, albeit anirruited. formative 
force on contemporary youth, teaching 
the utility of logs and warning against the 
dangers of urinating on electric fences 

But digital cable, meaning channels KO 
through g(xl knows how many, is destroy- 
ing the phiU>sophical fabric of basic cable 
Our young people are being kidnapped at 
their most lucid and absorptive stage, 
before they have gotten the chance lo 
nKander through the menagerie that is 
basic cable 

In our current mania for bigger, better, 
faster and more titillating cable entertain- 

Skulntan is a sccorwi-yNr American lileraturF 
and culture student vvho ertfoys backrubs 
and gum. E-nrwil bim at skooter7Pucla.edu. 



ment. we have negkxted the lessons from 
the Turner-era relics left over from cabk's 
past We are delivering the fallout from 
this dangerous oversight onto the next 
generation of TV-heads 

1 propose a renaissance, a rebirth and a 
rediscovery of what basic cable has to 
offer our parched and longing intelkrcts 
Let us relinquish our petty and simplistic 
infatuation with StarzAction' and 
Cinemax West and HBO and HBO and 
HBO 

Do we really need to see "Ready to 
Rumble" or "Pay It Forward" again'' 
Shoukl we be repeating these homnc mis- 
takes on several difTerent channels at 
once'' Should we be makmg mediocrity 
even more prevalent'' Should we be 
charged for if 

The answer, dear reader, is a steadfast 
and pleading. "No'" Open up your TV 
Guide and behold the worlds of wonder 
that are at your fingertips, those that can 
be reached without the 100* button on 
your remote 

For instance, the Lifetime channel is 
inaccurately advertised as Television for 
Women It has something to teach all of 
ui. regardless of which way our shirts but- 
Von Where would we be without the time- 
lew wisdom of the Golden Girls'' I know 
my life is richer now that I know the mti- 
malc details about sex between okl peiv 
pk 1 m sure we ve all lost sleep wonder- 
ing. 

Lifetime brings us this little slice of 
Freudian heaven at least twice a day. si> it 
you didn't know already, you can easily 
learn what happens »^n old women go 
to the groc-ery store to buy condoms 
Personally, "Ciolden (iirls" is a constant 
reassurance that I'll still be able to get 
si>mc when Im over W) 

Lifetime al.st> provides little nuggets of 
truth and beauty in the form of orphaned 
TV movies that it adopts and reruns 
Mi>st of these star KelK Martin as a 
deranged stalker or someone with an eat- 
ing disorder In m> personal favorite, she 
plays both It's calkd. Mother May I 
Skxp with Danger' " (I kni>w I have asked 
my mother this question man> times. 
Strangely, she always says no This 
Danger fellow must be quite something I 

And where else can you watch reruns 
ol the Dukes ol Haz/ard" but on The 
Nashville Network' B<i and Luke ari: 
paragons of American gumption and 



determination, plus they're hunky. 

You know, there sure are a lot of Boss 
Hoggs these days, capitalistic bullies in 
white suits and cowboy hats, metaphori- 
cally speaking of course As our economy 
continues to trample the hardworking 
middle-class, we need to heed the less^ms 
TNN IS providing 

When the going gets tough, the tough 
take mud-happy joyrides in an awesome 
l%9 Dodge Charger named the "Cieneral 
Lee " TNN also teaches us how to line 
dance, which is certainly the 20th centu- 
ry's last unheralded American artform 
Get thee to a boot scoot 

I am not a fan of most professional 
sports Thus, the Deuce, or ESPN 2. is a 
modem miracle Lumberjack contests, 
ladies billiards, and extreme horseriding? I 
never knew that spi^rts could be this excit- 
ing or rewarding Bob Costas would have 
you believe that all of man s prima! con- 
flicts can be seen in the grand metaphor of 
the diamond or the gridiron Can we be 
anymore obvious' 

The Deuce dares to create bolder and 
brassier sports metaphors Tr> finding the 
meaning of life m a miniature golf course 
or in a midget bowling lane Now there's i|. 
brain bender you won't find in your !<000 
satellite sports channels I can't wait till 
ESPN 3 airs freestyle walking and human 
chtrss 

Speaking of human chess, what about 
Court TV You ciHild literalh watch every 
second ot the () J trial, and after piles of 
insurmountable evidence were shovek;d 
to jurors, you get \o sec. live, the tbrma- 
tion of a huge pimple on the ass of the 
American judicial system "Sot that I have 
a strong opinion on the matter 

As heinous a miscarriage of justice as 
that trial was. it brought the courtnwm 
into the liMng r(Him. and that can't be a 
bad thing It was a great learning experi- 
enc-e For instance. I learned that my 
grandmother is cra/y After watching the 
whole trial, she still thought O.J was inniv 
cent 

So in concUision. 1 woukJ like to make 
a final pka. 

If you cant bring yourself to turn the 
TV otT. at least take advantage ol what 
basic cable has to olYer Watch a Spanish- 
language s«>ap opera, or Emergenc\ Vets 
or even Bob Vila Make the mtwt of your 
set. because a mind is a terriNe thing to 
waste on bad movies on HBO Seven 



'Blame game' leaves 
Cafifomians in lurch 



r)em(KTats 
seek scapegoatii, but 
don't help solve crisis 



.^ 



Here are some notable 
arguments you might have 
heard during the energy cri- 
sis 

"Those greedy outH>f- 
state producers they're 
price gouging us and mak- 
ing a killing off of the energy 
crisis ■ 

"Those ItKal utilities - 
they're not bankrupt - they 
must be hiding something " 

"ItsallCiov Pete 
Wilson s fault Wilson 
signed that deregulation bill 
into law in \99t and deregu- 
lation is killing us " 

These are the typical 
responses of Sacramento 
Democrats attributing fault 
to one party or another Not 
surprisingly, as California's 
energy crisis gradually fev > 
ters into a political crisis. 
Sacramento Democrats 
have resorted to playing the 
blame game 

Have these Democrats 
offered any real plans of 
action for dealing with the 
energy crisis' 

So far all thev've done is 
mount a smear campaign 
against easv targets and 
straw dummies the utilities 
and energv producers - to 
cover their own political 
hides 

Their emergency purchas- 
es of electricity continue to 
gut state budget revenues m 
an attempt to forestall politi- 

Perng is a fifth-year political 
scierKe student He serves as 
the chairman of Brum 
Republicans. 



cal fallout against the 
Democrats 

There's a "black hole" of 
real leadership in California 
and It emanates from Gov 
Gray Davis and the ruling 
Sacramento Democrats 

This "black hole" can be 
traced back to the '80s. 
when Democrats in the state 
legislature neglected 
California's energy infra- 
structure by failing to con- 
struct new power plants 
During this time, energy 
demand continued to soar 
with major population 
increases m the 'KOs and 
•90s 

This neglect increased 
our dependence on out-<if- 
state priKiucers to supply 
our energy needs, putting 
our energy fate in the hands 
producers in Texas and 
North Carolina 

What lame excuse did 
these liberals m the legisla- 
ture have to justify prohibit- 
ing new power plant ct>n- 
struction just as consumer 
demand was rising fast'' 

ThcN wanted to appease 
extremist environmentalist 
demands to meet hyper- 
stringent air quality stan- 
dards Tom Atkins words 
ring better than mine "Ten 
years ago. in a blissful 
attempt to commune with 
Mother Earth. C alilornia 
outlawed new power plants. 
No more burning that ickv 
fossil fuel and stuff ' 

Then came seven million 
more people And Silicon 
VallcN And an economic 
revolution 

Since l*>9(l. C alilornia 
power usage has dt>ubled 
So. where does more power 
come from' Ciotnl question 



See 



|M9e12 



GestLaVie 



By Jennifer Miyuki Babcock 




0« HYvr^ne 

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PERNG 

Fnmipagell 

There's no more nukes No more 
coal. No more oil and no more gas 
Unfortunately, there's also no more 
electric Calitornia now faces mas- 
sive rate increases and developing 
nation electric blackouts (www- 
acs ucsd.edu ucsdgop/adkinse- 
lect html) 

At the same time, these same 
Sacramento Democrats hogtied the 
operating options of our own local 
utilities to provide energy to con- 
sumers with the so-called deregula- 
tion law in 1996. forcing several of 
them to go bankrupt. 

Even though Gov Wilson s^netf 
deregulation into law in 1996. liber- 
al Democrats stufTed the deregula- 
tion bill with numerous inane rep^ 
lations that severely distorted the 
market at the expeiue of utilities. 
Now utilities must play by the 
Democrats deregulation regub- 
tions: -J.;-; :.■., ■ ;.-, ■ ,. ■..;- .,;.: 

I Utl B t ie nnii&tTMiy t he mi i tei 
pnce for wholesale electricity at all 
times, no matter how high or low. 

2. However, utilities can only sell 
electricity to their customers at a 
fixed price (ww«- 
acs ucsd edu/~ucsdgop/ete<^^ 
saga.html) 

Thus, even when the market 
price IS high, utilities must some- 
how magically absorb the losses. IT 
utilities continue to operate like 
this, however, they go bankrupt and 
jeopardize their ability to buy 
wholesale electricity for consumen. 
This then, creates energy shortages 
Democrats also mserted several 
other market distorting regulations 
into the deregulation law, forcing 
privately owned utilities to jump 
through a lot of hoops and obsta- 
cles to supply electricity, while spar- 
ing local utility monopolies the 
same burden. 

Among these obstacles, publicly 
owned utilities had to sell offthetr 
power plants and were forced to 
buy their electi-icity through a heav^ 
ily regulated Power Exchange (PX) 
Furthermore, utilities and suppb- 
ers could not make individual con- 
tracts; they were mandated to take 
the prevailing price of the PX 

With no power plants to raise 
iuppiv and little control in how 
much to charge consumers or buy 
from suppliers, utilities remained 
extremely vulnerable to fluctua- 
tions in the energy market So 
deregulation actually made publicly 
owned utilities powerless to stop 
the energy crisis from becoming the 
energy pandemic it is today 

The Democrats' heavy hand of 
government intrusion limited utili- 
ties' options and flexibility in pro- 
viding cheap power to consumers. 
Now that years of energy infra- 
structure neglect, severely distorted 
markets and deregulation regula- 
tions have taken their ultimate toll 
on California consumers. Gray 
Davis and Sacramento shamelessly 
fail to admit their mistakes 

That's fine, because coinciden- 
tally. they also fail to fix them. 

In the wake of utility bankrupt- 
cies. Gov. Davis and the state 
Legislature exemplify political cow- 
ardice by purchasing electricity on 
behalf of Californians to shield 
them from the fiill market effects of 
the energy crisis with the added 
benefit of maintaining their 
approval ratings. 

Davis' rash and sudden emer- 
gency purchases have eroded the 
state surplus, such that they will 
adversely impact the fiscal-year 
2002 budget, thus limiting funds for 
state services ("Budget drafts may 
hurt Ur schools". Daily Brum, 
News, July 9) 

Worst of all, Davis will continue 
to fund future energy purchases 
with "the biggest loan any state or 
local government has ever sought, a 



Daitv Brum 



Monday. July 16, 2001 



"13 



PERNG 

From page 11 

$n.4 billion b^>nd measure to cover 
the cost ot buying pi>wer. a 15-year 
mortgage lor maybe 15 rTH»nths of 
electricity ( www. sacbee.com /voic- 
es/news voicesfM 20010712 html I" 

The immense magnitude of this 
loan will erode C alifornia's credit 
rating and undermine its fiscal flex- 
ibilitN to lund Its priorities 

How do we repay this massive 
bond measure' 

Davis will screw consumers a lot 
later when he wont pinch them 
now and start raising utility rates 
significantly for many years, conve- 
niently .after his reelection cam- 
paign in 2002 

(www.ocrcgister com 'commen- 
tary 'guestcol.shtml ) 

h would have been more practi- 
cal just to have sent back the S9 bil- 
lion stale surplus to the people and 
let them use it towards their electric 
bills 

However, when Gray Davis gets 
his way. we'll be paying a lot more 
than $9 billion m future electric 
bills. 4hanks to the compounded 
interest rates on the bonds. 

C alifornians should realize that 
its continued economic prosperity 
might not be held hostage by the 
energy market had Calitornia par- 
ticipated actively in the energy mar- 
ket, by beefing up its energy infra- 
structure, untangling its deregula- 
tion regulations and allowing con- 
sumer prices to float 



SHAPIRO : 

Frompagf19 

increased nearly 20 percent from \^ 
■ 1999 (www census/gov/forelgn- 
^rade/balance/c5■'()() htmlt 

Allowing China into the WTO 
would enable greater access to the 
Chinese market, a supp«>sed "sleep- 
ing giant. ° but It would also make 
the American market even more 
accessible to Chinese producers 

The fact is that the buying power 
of the Chinese people will never | 

equal the buying pt>wer ol the I 

American public The Cirt>is j 

Domestic Product per capita is just 
$.V»(X) in China, while the CiDP per 
capita in America is $3.^.9tH) (CIA 
WbrW Factbook. 2000) 

Even in the unlikely event that the 
trade deficit were to decrease, the 
Chinese government could bliKk fur 
ther importation of American g(K>ds , 
through non-tarifl means j 

By allowing Chin;i inl«> the WTO 
the I S would iilso be p<niring ; 

money into the Chinese military 

China spends $.^6 5 billion and 
5.7 percent of its CiDP per year on 
its military, which is already the \ 

largest standing military on the plan- | 
et. with almost !< million active ; 

trtH)ps and another 12 million | 

reserves (New York Times Almanac. , 
2000) i 

Further. China is preparing for 
military operations, short-term in J» 
Taiwan but long-term in the 
.America In the words of I i S 
Congressman Bob Schafler. When 
Chirui IS building three new types of 
long-range ballistic missiles capable 
of attacking the United States and 
casts the shadow of militarism over 
the Far East. America is concerned" 
(www.hou8e.gov/schafTer/oel299con 
cerncd htm) 

When It comes to foreign policy 
in regards to China. America cannot 
afford to constantly play gcKid cop 
Ceding to China is a bad short-term 
policy but a disastrous long-term pol- 
icy China will continue to act 
aggressively against the US and 
Taiwan, maintain their current level 
of human rights abuses and he 
strongly communist, no matter how 
much the l> S tries to appease them 
America has found its new opp<> 
ncnt And America must face it 
bend-on. 




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S«M' pag«' 17. 

Vlonda\, JuK 16. 2(>01 



15 



r 




A f lower 




Lotus Festival cultivates an awareness of 
the cultures of Asva and the Pacific Islands 



WiNiam Av decorates around Echo Park Lake 
with colorful banrwfs for the Lotus Festival. 




The Indonesian Lion dance attracted many curious 
spectators as it kicked off the Lotus Festival 




Bryant Irawan. wf>o forms the second half of the 
Indonesian Lion Dance's lion, awaits his turn on stage 



Daily Brum Senior Stdff 

Evcrvonc m Southern (alilornui was in\iied lo cekbralc the 
bli>sNoming v»l a bed ot (lowers last weekend 

The Citv of Los Angeles Department i>( Recreation and hirks 
held it> 24th annual Lotus Festival Jul\ 14 and 15 in Echo l*ark. a 
sue that has the largest bed ot lotus in the tinned Stales 

The lotus llower. symbtili/mg rebirth, purity and life, has great 
significance i(> Asian cultures and gives .i fitting name \o a lesti- 
\al designed to promote understanding ot the pcopk and cul- 
tures (it Asia and the Pacific Islands 

When Asian and Pacific Islanders are perpetuaBv viewed as 
lureign it becomes eas> tor others to speak lor rather than listen 
[o them So it s imptirtant that they find venues through which to 
articulate their stories Un themselves, " said Julie (Tio. a I X LA 
leciiirer t\>i AMan American studies \vhi< is leaching the 
( ■ )ntemporar> Asian American ( ommunities class this summer 
Festnals (provide) b*>th a wa\ to preser\e (andl lo realign 
^iillure. and the> arc exprevsions of how particular communities 
^t)ntinue to find value and meaning in cultiu-a! practices that 
w ould otherw ise seem archaic and perhaps even dead," ("h<^ siiid 
Fven though this year s lestival theme was "Highlighting the 
Indonesian Culture." it still strove to show the value and meaning 
ol a viiriel> of cultures 

Along with the Indonesian Fashion Show, mtxieling tradition- 
al Balinese, Javanese and Sudanese apparel, entertainment at the 
festival alst> featured Polynesian dancers. Chinese folk 
dancers, classical Indian dancers. I'CLA Taiko 
Drummers and performances of Tae Kwon Do and Kung 
Fu. among other performances Both days had "Dragon 
Boat Races' with all proceeds going to the Lotus 
Scholarship tund and the night ol Ju!v 14th ended with an 
elaborate fireworks production over the lake. 

The eating area had everything from "Hawaiian 
lovers hibiscus drinks to Vietnamese egg rolls. Domino s 
piz/a. Thai barbecue. Chinese. Filipmo and Korean food 
Japanese doughnuts called "Dangos were served b\ 
members ol CSC s Cjamma Epsilon Omega Iralernitv 

People dont know how vast the Asian culture is." 
said Lotus Festival project assistant Irena Seta "The 
actual promotion is to show how much the Asian com- 
munUN has given to the local communitv (This festival is 
important ) not because I'm Asian, but because its nice lo 
share culture This is probabK the best wa\ to gel a lasle 
of how the bast meets the West " 



Ethnic boulK)ues and tents set up across the park helped lo 
share culture, selling items like Thai clothing, fans and silk. Asian 
zixliac T-shirts, gift iiems from Nepal and Tibet, henna bod\ art 
and handmade costume jewelry 

One of the miKt popular booths featured Chinese hand-cut 
paper art with Chinese messages such as "Own both 
wealth and high position" written on them Another 
crowded boutique specialized in hand-woven pulm 
figurines made using palm leaves and traditional 
Chinese handicraft skills Many people also waited 
m line lor the SIC l.'v-minute traditumal tool or body 
Thai massages V 

Although most of the festivaTs attractions catered 
to adults, ihere was plenty of action for children to 
get involved in as well There was a "spons zone" 
area, a children's stage area with mugic shows and 
Karaoke and a mini-carnivaL cumpicie with games, 
rides and cotton cand>. 

\ bridge allowed attendants to tToss over lo 
Flower Island." an island in the lake with the theme 
Ram Forests of Indonesia '" The miniature synthet- 
ic rain lorest was filled with a variety <if orc5hids. lolus 
blos.v)ms. Indonesian sculptures, mist and a IO>foo(- 
high itrangutan 

Over Us twixlay period, the festival successfully 
reached an estimated l(K).UOO to I5().(NX) pcopk; with 
Us cultural messages 

Following the lestival. attendants had the opportunity to 
leave the central kKalion of Echo Park and explore within 
Chinatown. Little Tokyo. Korcalown and the Pilipino and 
other Asian and Paafic Islander communities in the sur- 
rounding area 

The size of how we've grown shows thai we've done reaF 
ly wen." said Seta, who has been working on the festival with 
the Department of Recreation and Parks for over three 
years °° It s a really great festival and we've always heard pos- 
itive things about It." 

Next year, when ihe lotus fltnyers bkrwom. crowds will 
gather again to celebrate culture and the growth of Southern 
California communities 

"We only have a few neighborh(xxl festivals every year so 
this IS a big deal for the whole community. " said Joni Brill, a 
liKal resident and spectator of the festival "Look at the 
crowd. Ihe diversity I can't define what I've learned becau.se 
every year I pick up stuff from the shows, dancxs and music, 
but I certainly am enriched by it " 




I Tio waits fcK his cue to begin the 
Indonesian Lion dance at the festival 




Jayshrec Ncnscy, right, draws a henna tattoo on Laiara Own. 




Oiarlas Daboar and Laakana Nham spend a moment 
together in front of the lotus bk>ssoms in Echo Park. 



^^^^_ 


•«. ^ J' ' ' 




.> V> 4 





ExNbit aHows rare study of remarkable artist 



REVIEW: Dali's attention to 
detail, ingenuity is apparent 
in his works nov> on display 



Kat Kussd studies a 1 971 bronze sculpture titled "The Earth Mother" 
July 1 4 in Ackerman Grand Ballroom at the exhibit's opening night 



By 

Daily Brum Contributor 

A piece ol C amemben cheese, mdting 
and sliding over a table's edge, was tttc 
inspiration Tor artist Salvador Dali's 
trademark images of mdting cl<Kks 

Dali's works, including a lithograph of 
"Pcrsislence of Memory" with its famous 
cltKks. IS being housed for two weeks in 
Ackerman Grand Ballroom 

ThrtHigh July 27. Ackerman is boast- 



ing an extravngant gallery setup, suitable 
for displaying the largest collection ol' 
Salvador Dali works ever shown in 
Southern California 

The exhibit is comprised of more than 
5(N) pieces of Dali's an. including original 
paintings, sculptures. limUed edition 
prints, lithographs, bas-reliel and tapes- 
tries In addition, more than 200 col- 
lectible memorabilia items arc on display, 
such as magazaies in which Dali was fea- 
tured and novels that he Australed 

AITirming surrealism at an alternative 
to the more formal cubism style, Dali 
promoted rationality mixad with irra- 
tionality The Spanish-bom artist had a 
Hair for illustrating the subconscious - 
merging the conscious worid with the 



unconscious world m his pieces to create 
the4)erplexing eflect of surreiilism. 

Dali's art is not limited, however, to 
surrealism Many of his pieces were 
inspired by literature There are numer- 
ous paintings based the folk tale Don 
Quixote" and entire suites are dedicated 
to "Alice in Wonderland. " "The I>ivine 
Comedy" and various mythokigicai sto- 
ries The images based on 'The [>ivine 
Comedy" are divided into three sets 
"kifemo." "Purgatory" and "Parwdisc " 
The entire lOO-piecc wotxfblock cnpraved 
set IS on display in Ackerman Cirand 
Ballroom, detailing many of Dali's briF 
liant yet horrific visions ol purgatory 

Since original Dali works are difTicull 
to acquire, nuiny items in this exhibit are 



prints and lithographs However, the 
originals that arc included are extremely 
impressive 

Luna A La Calanque de Culip" for 
example, is one of the originals included 
in the showcase, valued at $.SO(),lHH) 
What IS remarkable aK)Ut the piece is 
that It was pnxluced in 1914 Dali. born 
in IW4. created "Luna" when he was 
only 10 years old 

When viewing Dalis art. visual per- 
ceptions are often deceived Though 
Dali's creations arc always stimulating 
and intriguing, it is sometimes dilTicutt to 
decipher what hu intentions were. 

"Lmcohi in Dahvision" for instance. 






nd 



Ambition 




Racsc Witharspoon stars in the new comedy "Legally Blonde" as Elle Woods, a 
beautiful, fashion savvy sorority president turned Harvard Law student. 



FILM: Hollywood ffoWfti ^irl 
chalienpes stereotypes, prtno 
to be anything but 'rliieless' 



Sw 



If 



By 

Daily Bnan Senior Staff 

The summer c^f girl power is well under way 
with estrogen-driven movies ready to kick 
things up a notch Mrcady. Angelina Jolie has 
caused quite a .scene busting it up as Lara C roft 
in "Tomb Raidei ' In "C ra/y Beautiful. " 
Kirsten Dunsi pl.ivv an aggressive high sch*H>l 
student who s ready to gel ii on And don i lor- 
got Dr Aki Ross, the computer-generated 
brunette in "Final Fanla.sy The Spinis W ithin' 
who batik's aliens to defend the world 

Joining the ranks of these larger-ihan-lile 
female heroines is Reese Withcrspoon 
("Election." "Pleasantville"'l She s smart 
funny and dres.sed to kill in her latest film 
"Legally Blonde." where she plays Elle W<xkIs. 
a sorority girl turned law student 

Armed with a degree in fashion merchandi.v 
ing and a big heart, she takes Harvard. Law 
School by storm She rises above people s 
expectations of her and overturns common stig- 
mas of all blonde women 

"The movie dispels all thi>se ideas." said 
Wiihersp<xin at a Los Angeles press junket 

Iliough she s dressed in her character s .sig- 
nature cokir. pink, it's hard to imagine anyone 
confusing Witherspintn lor .i dumb blonde 
but that s not to say thai the accimiplished actor 
hasn't struggled with stereotypes. 

ThiHigh she hasn't experienced much blond 
discrimination, the lennessee native was told 
early (w in her acting career to lose her accent 

■ Ive had to deal with stereotypes from just 
being Southern, Wiihersp«Hin s^iid "Pcopkr 
think automatically that it you have a Southern 
accent that you must have seven children and 
live on a farm " 

Withcrspoon has since learned to tone down 
her Southern mannerisms while overcoming 
the same close-minded adversaries that her 
"LeguHy Blonde' character encounters 

In the film, Elle fcarns the hard way that 
blondes don't always have more fun Aftei her 
Harvard-bound boyfriend dumps her for being 
too bkmde. she follows him across the country 
in hopes of winning him back 

She IS admrtted to Harvard Law School 
(many ofthe scenes were fibned at l)CLA>oniy 



to find out that her ex has found a more suilahle 
marrying type in the brunette Vivian 
Kensington (Selma Blair) 

lo make things worse. Vivian is »Ht a jealous 
rampage to siibotage Elk's life 

Blair who went to boarding sch»H>l in 
Michigan, admitted that she knew plenty ol 
treacherous pearl-wearing girls like Vivian. 

"We never had an Elle WihkIs come to our 
sch(H)l to test out just how nasty they might have 
ht'cn. " she said 

Blair also confided that she was born blonde, 
akhougii she grew into a natural brunette 

"My mom still thinks ol me as a blonde and 
shes shtKked every time she sees me ' Blair 
said "She's like. When are you going to stop 
putting that sh<x; p<Mish on your hair'" She defi- 
nitely thinks blondes are the way lo go and I dis- 
appoint her every time she sees me '" 

Though It s uncertain whether or not mom 
knows best. Blair thinks that people perceived 
her as a little less threatening when she was a 
blonde 

"I love being a brunette and I love blondes - 
I m really drawn to the light. " she said "But I 
think people think of me as much more dramat- 
ic and a little scary with dark hair " 

With "Legally Blonde" inevitably likened lo 
the IM95 flick "Clueless, K>lh Withcrspoon 
and Blair don't seem to mind comparisons to 
the leen<ulture classic 

""That really kicked ofT the whi>le Icen thing" 
ol watching a young girl be sexy and funny," 
Blair said 

Like Alicia Silversloncs character Cher Elle 
leaches audiences lo Ux>k beyond her prelty-in- 
pink exterior 

B<Mh girls use their hearts and their heads to 
find empowerment while siill remaining sexy 
and sweet 

Nevertheless, Withcrspoon said that Ellc's 
story IS still very different from Cher s 

"It's about a woman not needing a relalKtn- 
ship (and) finding herself without the confines 
ot other people s ludgments," she siud 

If that theme sounds familiar, it's because the 
film was written by Karen Mc<hullah lut/ and 
Kirsicn Smith (the team behind 10 Things I 
Hate About You") Ruent m teen speak the 
two took Australian director Robert l.uketic on 
a tour of Elks world which included hanging 
out at Barney's and learning sorority rituaK 

■" I think you have to approach every charac- 
ter with a certain amount of intelligence." 



See 



17 



REVIEW: Performance 
by Wilherspoon is high 
point of fluff} comedy 

ByltaryVMhMK 
Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Sometimes it's better to go into 
a movie without expectations 

Expect nothing from "Legally 
Blonde. ' for example, and leave 
content that it was worth the $9 

But that's not to say that its a 
good, or even noteworthy movie 
Two days after seeing it. the aver- 
age viewer will probably have little 
but a pa.ssmg recollection of a 
mildly pleasant evening's enter- 
tainment It requires nothing of 
the audience and gives little in 
return. 

The story revolves around Elle 
a bright, beautiful and very blonde 
college student whose boyfriend 
dumps her before he leaves to 
attend Harvard Law School She 
becomes determined to get him 
back, manages to get accepted lo 
the same school and follows him to 
Boston 

The fish-out-tif-water jokes 
cause some chuckles but there's no 
single line or scene that is remark- 
ably funny 

As tor the visual direction, the 
film IS seemingly made along the 
same lines as television shows for 
small children It feeds the viewer 
bright, pretty colors and simple, 
straightforward dialogue Nothing 
IS confusing, thought- provoking, 
mind-twisting or convention-chal- 
lenging 

While this may sound like a 
complete t>ore. the movie dock 
have a strength in Reese 
Witherspoon's ("Pleasantville," 
"Election") performance as the 
perky pink-clad Elle 

As much as the role may mirror 
AliciM Silverstone's character in 
"Clueless," Withcrspoon makes 
her character of a manicured, 
shop-aholic social queen come off 
a little smarter and a little less clue- 
less than Cher Elle is not a woman 
to be underestimated and that is 
one of her more endearing quali- 
ties 

WitherspiKin exudes more ener- 
gy than the rest of the cast com- 
bined, but a less enthusiastic por- 
trayal would have left the film life- 
less and dull. Her perk mess, much 
like the excited coos of the 
Teletubbies. holds the viewer's 
attention when there is little else to 
do so in the film 

Mo«t of the characters are one- 
dimensional space-fillers, like 
Elle's ex-boy friend Warner, played 
by Matthew Davis ("Urban 
Legends Final Cut") Unlike Elle. 
Warner isn't smarter than he 
kx>ks, or less shaUow. 

In the end. the same can be saki 
for the film itself It's summer fluff 
that's inoffeasive, but nothiBg spe- 
cial. 



Ki MondjN liiK Hr2(M)l 



Ddih Bruin i%rts It Ealertamaiieiit 




Screen See nfi 




John Cusack Catherine ZeU- Jones and 
Julia Roberts star in the romantic conriedy 
"Americas Sweethearts " 

"America's Sweethearts" 

Directed by Joe Roth 

Starring: Julia Roberts, Catherine Zeta- 

Jones and John Cusack 

f l.ishbatk ic .1 cawk> and overweight Julia 
Rdbcrls 

[Xm t »i)rr\. il s lusl H(illywiH>d s prett\ 
wonian donning a lal suit lor America s 
SwccthcarlN " What - even more unbelie\able 
th.iii Riiberis iii her plu>-M>-pound> scenes is th.il 
Ilk < >S(..ii-«innmu actor turned doun the le.id m 
the I'lliii to pla\ ,1 siipporiint: role 

111 ■ NottinL' Hill Ri>berts was the unattain- 



able starlet the woman that everyone admired 
In America s Sweethearts. ( atherine /.eta- 
Jones is the nation s darling. Ciwen Harrisoti 
John ( usacic pla>s her long time on-screen and 
olT?.creen partner, hddie Thomas And Roberts 
IS Kiki. ( iwen s Itiyal and servile personal assiv 
tani 

It s H tabloid journalist °.s dream come true 
when (iwen and Eddie call it quits in complete 
HollywtHxl fashion 

She dumps him lor Hector, the Latin lover 
(played b> Hank .\/aria) and with a broken 
heart, tddie check.s into a spiritual wellness cen- 
ter to treat his raging depressH>n and jealousy 
(But they're still very cU>se. says the quiHable 
couple I 

Written b> BilK C rysial and his "Analyze 
This" partner Peter Tolan. the film is a laughable 
love story thmk sentimentality ot "When 
Harry Met Sally " lused with the dyslunctional 
HollywtxKl cynicism of "Slate and Mam" that 
reminds audiences whv romantic comedies are 
meant to be predictable 

As stnm as the characters arc intrixluced. it is 
clear that Kiki is not going to spend the entire 
mov le loveless and lonely This underdog will 
have her day. and hcli»re you know it. Ciwen is 
plav ing second fiddle to a new and improved 
kiki 



\ou can see the schmall/v outcome of the 
m»u le in contrived shots of hddie and Kiki. 
cmoying a genuine chemistrv that Eddie and 
Ciwen so obviously lacked 

The predictability of the story enables the film 
to draw attention away from trite love cliches, 
tociising It on the cdortul characters and ck'ver 
humt)r 

The movie gives audiences a first-hand look at 
the media circus known as the press junket. 
( Even moviegoers who arent versed in the 
show-bi? sht>p talk will enjoy the hilarious carica- 
tures of Tinseltown ) 

When an over-the-lop publicist )C rystai) 
needs to stall the national press screening of the 
latest Eddie and Ciwen flick, as a diversion he 
convinces the media hordes that the once hot 
Hollywcxxl Item is in the prtK-ess o( reconcilia- 
tion 

Crystal plays a greasy city slicker who 
checked his stml at (he door of his public rela- 
tK)ns firm His groveling intern (Seth Cireen). 
can only hope to become half the deceptive spin 
master that his mentor is. 

Standing apart from the media circus of the 
movie IS Kiki and the killer scene-stealing 
R»>berts smikv 

Christopher Walker easiK slips into the 
unpredictaNe Hal a director who'» a tew 



frames sht>n of a reel 

Zeta-Jones pulls out all the stops for her egiv 
cra/ed diva character and C usack is a tunny 
man even m Eddies scenes (>f desperate hope- 
lessness 

America s Sweethearts ma\ he a pre- 
dictable romp through the u(» and di>wns of 
love, but It takes on new relevance by placing it 
in the context of the biggest carnival ride of them 
all ' the media 

/; ; Emilia Hwang 
Rating:? 

"Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within'' 
Directed by Hironobu Sakaguchi 
Starring: Ming-Ma and Alec Baldwin 

Will Smith had to fight them five years ago on 
Independence Day. Mulder and Scully deal with 
them on a regular basis and just last year 
humans had to deal with a dreadlocked John 




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Monday, July 16, 2001 17 



Cake goes the distance 
wNle improving sound 



MUSIC* .\fler an absence 
from the scene, the band 
is back with a new album 



Cake docsn^ seein to he in any rush 

For two years, the alternative rock 
hand has managed to ignore the lure of 
the spotlight and the demand lor a new 
album 

Instead of touring, the group has 
worked methodically lor a hctter guitar 
riff or keyboard sound, according to the 
group's trumpet player. Vincent 
DiFiore. a UCLA psychology student 
who graduated in '86 

"It's not just the first thing that 
comes to ts when we wnte the song." 
said DiFiore m a phone interview from 
the backyard of his Sacramento home 
"We have to .go through like 20 major 
changes for a song before we've arrived 
on the final version" 

Now. Cake is back With a new 
album. "Comfort Eagle." and an 
upcoming tour, the quartet is picking 
up where they teft off. 

Recent music industry wisdom 
would suggest that a band couldn't suc- 
OHrfully reenter the capricious scene of 
popular music after so long an absence 
The trend is for bands to release lollow- 



up albums within a year of their hit to 
make the most of their success 

Cake, known for their singkrs "The 
Distance." from the album "Fashion 
Nugget" and "Never There." from 
"Prolonging the Magic. " haven't, how- 
ever, subscribed to this theory 

Instead, singer songwriter John 
McCrea. guitarist Xan N4cCurdy. 
hassist Gabriel Nelson and DiFiore. 
took their time creating the band"s 
fourth album. 

"There is only so much space you 
have to make some coherent music, and 
we're just trying to be really careful 
about that space There is nothing on a 
record that is wasteful It.s a very eco- 
nomical approach and a resourceful 
approach." DiFiore said 

"We never rested Even though •« 
haven't played a show in two years, 
we've been working." he continued 

The new album will not be released 
until July 24. hut the radio hit "Short 
Skirt. Long Jacket" is ninth on the 
Billboard modern rock singles chart 
The track is also among the 20 mi>st fre- 
quently played songs on the Los 
Angeles area radio station KROQ 

"We've had two big songs from them 
that worked for us before, and when 
this came out we just added it. thinking 
we've had success with the last two 
songs." said Lisa Warden. KROQ's 
music direclor "We just sort of put il 
on in Mind faith." 




Rock group Cake's latest single "Short Skirt, Long Jacket" is featured 
on Its soon-to-be released album "Comfort Eagle." 



Warden added that although they 
have received mixed response, it is tot> 
early to gauge the song's success with 
listeners 

Even with a promising amount ot 
radio airplay. C^e isn't rushing out on 
tour The band has decided to ease back 
into playing for large audiences 

The group will be playing a few small 
shows in the Sacramento and Los 
Angeles areas, for crowds o\ around 
100 people, before starting their nation- 
wide tour 

"The smaller venues are kind of like 
training wheels before we gel to the big 
bike that is our regular touring." 
DiFiore said 

After two years of playing only in 
studios, the band is concerned about 
losing cohesiveness if they jump into 
shows at bigger venues, according to 
DiFiore. 



"If all ot a sudden you throw your 
music into a big venue you can kind ol 
lose control of it. and the band can it>se 
Its grixwe." he said "So wc re sort v)t 
taking some smaller steps up to the big- 
ger .stages because we don't want to lose 
all the griK>ve we have so tar from 
rehearsing " 

This process of constant musical 
improvement is by no means o^cr 
After this tour the band plans \o go 
back in the studio 

DiFiore said that he hopes the group 
can improve its method of touring, and 
of course, be working on another 
record 

"It always seems like louring can be 
a little bit difficult, especially if people 
have families and everything." he said. 
"We want to make another good 
album, and sort of improve everything. 
the way that we have up to this point" 



BLONDE 

From page 1 S 

Withersp<H)n said 

"It s important to do your 
research and reulK put yourself in 
that person's shoes hcciusc 
everyi)ne wants to be repftftrnltf(|i 
fairly and rcahstically" -' ": 

For WithcrspcKin. that meant 
literally putting on Flics high- 
heels diiy after day. a heroic tu.sk 
that lett the actor with a big pixli- 
atrist bill But it s Withersp^xm's 
dcdic.ition to her tratt that has 
earned her the respect ot' ctvstars 
like Holland J^gAnr ("Bf 
Practice"! "'""■■ ' • ; -■" '■ 

"What she has along w ith a lot 
of other coniedian-s like Judy 
Holliday and Lucille Ball is that 
these women whi> play ditsy 
blondes and silly women usually 
have IQs ofl the charts.' said 
Taylor, who plays Elk s hard4iit- 
ting professor " Most people who 
are gtxxi comedic actors are very 
smart people Comedy is much 
harder than just straight acting 

"She s a very smart comedian 
IMd she knows what she s doing." 
Taylor continued "Its her intelli- 
gence that allows her to play this 
charm, this innocence, this sweet- 
ness, this seeming brainlessness." 

At 25. Withcrspoon already 
has an inspiring film career 
(which includes her own produc- 
tion company), a promising 
Hollywood marriage (with actor 
Ryan Phillipe who starred oppo- 
site her in "Cruel Intentions"), a 




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Daily Brum Arts k Ent«rtainneat 



DALI 

From page 1 5 

provides a blurred image of Abraham 
LincDin. which, upon closer examination. 
IS a picture ot a woman looking t>ui the 
window of a tiled rtK)m 

Some of his pamting.s. like the commis- 
sioned p«>rtrails. are completely represcn- 
lational. while other works are led open 
to individual interpretation 

Regardless of the style or meaning of 
his art. one thing is clear Dali was a skill- 
ful artist dedicated to detail and ingenu- 
itv None of his works seem sub par It 
the image is busv. ii is not distaste) ulN so 
II the image is a bit sparse, nothing is 
lacking 

I he exhibit pri>vides a rare opptirtuni- 
IV lor viewers to experience an impres- 
sive number of Dali s pieces and learn 
about the lile and style o\ this remark- 
able, inlluential artist 

AITT: 'Dali at UCLA displays until July 27 m 
Ackerman Graf>d Ballroom The exhibft is 
open Monday through Saturday from 10 
am to 9 p m and Sunday from 10 am to 6 
p.m Tickets are S7 general admissKKi arid $4 
for students For information visit 
wwvw.daltatucla.com or call (310) 825-2101. 



BLONDE 

From page 1 7 

pet chihuahua named Cheech 
and a lovel> 2-year-old daughter 

Like her on-screen character 
who will do anything tor the love 
ot her life. Withersptxjn knows 
what It s like to be bitten by the 
k)ve bug 

"When I met Ryan Id only 
known him for a month and 
talked to him on the tek;phoiK 
I flew acrosk the country to go 
sec him." she siiid "The second I 
stepped otT the plane. I thought. 
What the heck did I just do''' but 
It all turned out for the best " 

Taking a chance proves to be 
fruitful for Elle as well, who 
remains true to her rtxits white 
discovering her passKtns and 
realizing her goals 

"I love the spirit ot the film." 
Withersp«Hin said "It s the kind 
ot movie that you go and yiHi 
laugh but you reali/e at the end 
you kind of teel better about 
yourself You learn a little stime- 
thing " 



SCREEN 

From page 1€ 

Travolta trying to take over the 
planet. 

Those aliens just never give up 

That's right toiks. aliens are 
invading Eanh once again Only 
this time It s the year 2065 and the 
computer-generated scientist Aki 
( Ming-Na) h here to keep these 
alien creatures from killing ofT 
what s left of the human race 

And she's trying to d(^ H in a 
completely computer-generated 
world that is unlike anything view- 
ei^ have ever seen before. 
Animators of "Final Fantasy The 
Spirits Within" spent countless 
hours and SI 1 5 million creating the 
most eerily realistic characters and 
breathtaking scener> ever made 
with ones and zeros 

But what would a truly engaging 
storyline do to enhance these amaz- 
ing special effects'' Sadly, viewers 
won't find out by watching this film 

The plot, while exciting and inter- 
esting at times, is not nearly as awe- 
inspiring as the computer anima- 



tion 

Aki and her scientist mentor. Dr 
Sid (Donald Sutherland) have been 
studying the invading phantom-like 
extra-terrestrials for a white and are 
slowly beginning to understand how 
to correctly combat the vicious 
aliens One of the alien creatures 
has also (bund its way inside of Aki. 
and. while providing her with clues 
on how to defeat the aliens, it is also 
slowly killing her. 

Meanwhile, a bitter General 
Hem (James Woods), wishes to take 
a more destructive approach by uti- 
lizing a state-of-the-art laser beam 
that has never been used before 
What he doesn't understand. Uom- 
ever, is that using this high-powered 
laser beam will only worsen the situ- 
ation and may kill off the earth itself 
without having any effect on the 
alien life forms 

Aki and Dr Sid must embark on 
a race against time to complete their 
quest before the general fires the 
laser at the earth or the creature 
inside Aki kills her 

On their mission, numerous bat- 
tles erupt between the aliens and the 
humans These thrilling, realistic 



battle sequences are definitely the 
most redeeming aspects of the 
movie 

Viewers, however, will eventually 
get so lost in the story's convoluted 
complexity that the film will become 
incrediMy strange and uninterest- 
ing 

Perhaps the most vague and con- 
fusing aspect of the plot is how Aki. 
Dr Sid and the team of soldiers 
intend to defeat the alien creatures. 
They search the earth for eight spi^ 
Its that, when combined. Aki and 
Dr Sid believe will defeat the invad- 
ing creatures It really makes no 
sense - 

This IS largely due to the fact that 
the movie never explains why or 
how the combination of these spirits 
will destroy the creatures. This lack 
of explanation and clarity will alien- 
ate even the most avid ot sci-fi fans. 

"Final Fantasy: The Spirits 
Within" reminds viewers once again 
that even the fanciest special effects 
and most thrilling action scenes 
can't make up for a sub-par story- 
Iwc. 

• Simeal KoUuri 
Rating: S 




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WanteO tor a researcti study a; UCLA Mtin 
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U900 

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AC AM/EM CD Good condition $2900 
310 966 1966 

1988 MUSTANG GT CONVERTIBLE 5r 
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tine condition Stick $6800 323-650 9526 

1990 PEARL WHITE JAOUAR XJ6 Low 
miles eKcellent condition new tires Must 
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'400-8300 



7500 

Career Opportunities 



BARTENDERS 




7100 

Tutorinq Wanted 



TUTORS WANTED 

FOR ALL SUBJECTS GRADES K 12 At the 
Student s Home in the WLA BH SM areas 
$11 25 ismr Call 310-444 0125 

EAmit$500-700/WK witti a spare bdrm and 
a Afwe Give Foreign students room and 
tXMid Spend 1 5hrs /«»k teaching enghsh 
One or Two weeks/month Andy 714 392 
0800 

HOMEWORK TUTOR 

For lO-year-oM t>oy Monday Thursday 4 
5hours/day Enrolled in school ol Education 
and must dnve Call 310-991-4481 

TUTORING WANTED FOR 9lh grader In 
home Homework help Brentwood 310 
472 7342 



TLACH THE SATs 



Need energetic people with 

High SAT scores lo prep 
students 1-on 1 or in classes 
All regions. $lS-$2S/hr 
hours Car needed C.a 

310-448-1744 
www.tutoriobs.coin 



[GMrra COUNSELING 
I TESTING SERVKES 



7600 

Child Carr OtttTfC 



EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER plus light 
housework ExcaNant local references CPR 
phis first aid trained TB tested Own car plus 
insurance Fluent English German, French 
Mor>days-Fndays. mornings availat>ie 
$15/»»r 310-477-5104 

PRESCHOOL 

SUMMER PROGRAM WONDER YEARS 
PRESCHOOL run by UCLA grads 
Ages2 5/6years Two large play-yards Open 
7 30-5 30 Close to UCLA 310-473 0772 

THE BABYSITTERS 
CLUB 

Provides cn-cali sitter service to parents 
Days, awantngs and w aa fc a n d s 310-226 
2900 



7700 



LOOKING FOR CHME8E SABYSITTER for 
two year oM girt adofflad Imni Chma Santa 
Monica Must have car S9/hr 310-395 
4725 



Classifieds 
8?e>-222i 



7700 

Child Care UVanted 



MOTHERS HELPER FOR 2 CHILDREN 
Light housekeeping and cooking Monday 
Friday lpm-6pm $10/hr Car and relHiem 
es required Near UCLA 310-208-6004 



PK:K up and CARE 

For tun 6-year okJ boy in WLA M TH 3 
6 30PM References and car insurance re- 
quired SlO/hour Optional more hours for 
light cleaning and cooking Susan Jay 310 
479-8204 



PT CHILDCARE 

For Very special by: oio Jdughlef Inter 
nalior>ai or bilingual background pre- 
terred carftreterences required Grand 
Piano Beverly wood Laird 3 10-287 
1677 



THE BABYSITTERS CLUB needs babysit 
ters now Days evenings and week-ends 
Must have expenence $i0ftir 310 226 
2900 



7800 

Hrir lA/anied 



$15-$23/HR BRIGHT ENTHUSIA^^IC peiv 
pie to teach SAT prep and ALL Academic 
Subiectb Transportation required We will 
train Flexible hours Send or lax cover let- 
ter/resume including test scores (SAT GRE 
etc I to ACE Educational Services Attn Bai 
ry 9911 W Picc Blvd Ste PH K LA CA 
90035 Fax 310-282-6424 Posilioni. avail 
able throughout LA and tfie Valley 

$200-800/DAY FOR NUDE MODELING 
Women wanted lor nude modeling Photo 
and Video Contact Chase 310 261-5216 or 
chase tfslasians com 



Mrii HKiiiii^: t.liit<tnii jjl JO'S ma^ 

rur. T\ liliir. ( mmiinTiji^ Wdffi/d" 

till fk'i\illill iillinhli . (<// 1/ ./, 

310.659.7000 



2 BONUS$$ PER 
YEAR!! 

Sexy WebtSKjf C" ; • , >Hing lor 3 admm 
assts heri) s youi oay-creaie mktg proposals 
w/PwrPnt. arrange meetings. conlerences 
handle mt l- travel liaise witti powerlui mt i tig 
ures. and work m drop dead oftKes Must be 
pokshed ariicuiaie and have great Microsoft 
Office skills Unreal uppty tor college grad or 
already- there asst' Great salary and un 
matched benefits' Immed int vs' Ttie Place 
ment Company Fax 310-889 7101 deidre 
dale9earihiink net 

ANYONE CAN DO THIS Work around your 
scfHXJl schedule $50O-$l500/monfh Pan 
time 818 751 795! 



BANKING 



P/T leller'riew accounts positions at Ur>ivers 
ity Credit Union Excellent pay hours A envi 
roniT>en! Some expenerKe prelerrad Apply 
at 1500 S Sepulveda Blvd LA 90025 Fax 
resume 310-477 2566 or on web 
I ucu o«g/|Obs htm 



BOOKEEPER 

PART TIME Wesioou Musi be tamiliar with 
QuickBooks Pay Flexible 310-441 4200 
Fax 310-441-2443 

BOOKKEEPER 
WESTWOOD 

WANTED BookkeetiHi Quu K Books 2000 
experienced accounts payat>le/receivabie 
and payroll i day/week -flexible Call Ro/ 
310-234-6699 

BOOKKEEPING/ 
ACCOUNTING ASST 

Required t)y small mfl logistics company ot 
tour Location Redondo Beach 30-35hrs re 
quired Expenence in Ouickbooks prelerred 
Expenence in ottier accounting software 
considered Bilingual in Spanish/ Asian tan 
guage preferred Int'i students wifl be consid 
ered Hi OK Accounting background pre 
temad Can start immediately Email lo clara 
gayOpacbaN not or tax resume 310-536 
0390 Leave massage in 24hr voicemaii 
310 226-8461 

CHILDCARE 4 and 8y/o M-F(3 30-7pm) 
Pick-up m SM and drive to Sherman Oaks 
Salary Nag References/car needed 818 
tli •66451 evenings) or mgtanaay*|uno com 

CLERICAL 

CLERICAUCLiSTOMER SERVICE M-F FT 
PERMANENT Good phone and English 
skills detaiionented rekable WLA $9 50 
$10mr 310-826-3759ext229 

CLERK TYPIST/ 

RECEPTIONIST Manage small medical re 
search group Good comrnurtcaiKKVwnting 
■kms. word -processing Windmw 9S up to 
20houra/wk weekday-mornings Starting 
S8 OOmr Westwood 310-826-0679 



Quality Health Care 
for the sulnmer - 

mostly FREE with MIP or PUSH 



www.studenthealth.ucla.edu 



or coll 825-4073 



ucia Ashe Center 



TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD PUZZLE 



ACROSS 

1 'Iliad' poet 
6 Disagreement 
10 Dupe 

14 Residence 

1 5 Fitzgerald or 
Raines 

16 Mountain lior 

17 Lunch times 

18 Kind of film 

1 9 Heron cousin 

20 Senor s blanket 
22 Freeway user 
24 Vex 

26 Sut>iects 

27 Fastest land 
animal 

31 Bran source 

32 Landscape 
planting 

33 Broadway backer 
36 Undergrad degs 

39 Othello s toe 

40 Did winter 
sports 

41 Dog without 
papers 

42 W ftBid 

43 Constructed 

44 Main artery 

45 Kingsley ot 
"Gandhi" '■' 

46 Weird 

48 Rio Grande city 

5 1 Flower container 

52 Concentrating 
54 Ghost 

59 Petty from 
"Tank Girl" 

60 Cyclotron 
target 

62 Bert s "Sesame 
Street" pal 

63 "T — Tom" 

64 Sole 

65 More secure 

66 Ties trie knot 

67 Gush (out) 

68 Retail outlet 

T 



PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED 




M6-01 



c 2001 umtea ^aaUMe Synacaiv 



DOWN 

1 Dutch boy 
Bnnker 

2 Woodwind 

3 Anchor 

4 "Giant" auttior 
Fert)er 

5 Lull 

6 Dry. as wirw 

7 Purple fruit 
e Ration 

9 Like some 
sailors 

10 Courage 

1 1 Block shaped 

12 Wrong 

13 Clipper ship 
feature 

21 Important 

penod 
23 Milky gem 
25 Uniform fabric 

27 Poker token 

28 Recover 

29 Tense 

30 Swelled head 



34 Nothing 

35 Costume 

36 Smolder 

37 Memo abbr 

38 Hang around 

40 Garden 
adomments 

41 Extinct bird 

43 fMectar 
gatherers 

44 Kate Hudson 
for one 

45 Boston hockey 
team 

47 "Right this 
second'' 

48 Not tight 

49 Pungent 

50 In the lead 

52 Blemish 

53 Part of "GWTW 

55 Trapped like — 

56 The lowdown 

57 Layer 

56 rsiot there 
61 Kittys cry 




Dtspla< 
206- 3e 



22 MondJV. Juh IK. 2W)\ 



7800 

Help Waoted 



Dailv Brum C1awifie4 



7800 

Hfip kA/anied 



Looking to fit a {iexibie 

job into your futt-tinie 

schedule? 



Jf you're mate, in good 
health, in college or have 
a college degree, and 
would Ifke a flexibte job 
where you can earn up 
to $600 per month 
AND set your own 
hours call for details on 
our anonymous sperm 
donor program Receive 
hee health screening 
and help infertile couples 
realize their dream of 
becoming parents. 




310-824-9941 

or e-mail us at 
donors@cryobank.com 



Are you a model 



re u«*t scnrrfff' 



LiHAinj; lt>r all types 

iiiak'/lcnulc iiMKicls/acK)r> 

*>• alvi' have Plu'- si/r & ChiUlren iliv 

t ' pnnt \ n«i4^ uniitfi «.<<min4*r(.idt-, 

N. \tx*tK*rK>- required N,- Ice-, 



CLRHK PHONE RECEPTIONIST lor an m 

li,'- ' 'irsi'ji MFiyarilpmi Knowl 

^■'^^ff■ ' ;)iiii k[i )(,>Kb helplui Fa« resunw 
U '(-1 1 <• '.ir" Aridrea 

CORPORATE .)ET interndtiondl llighi aneno 

rini Musi t'e iiuen' ir Cfiinese'EnglisM anrt 
t)e *illini; u 'emcalt-: ic Guam Great bene 
tits ■r'surrfn<;f Fax resume Ic; ACl®949-955 
IC,! > ^>-r Njrtrurr 

JENTAL RECEPTIONIST AND ALSO A 
DENTAl ASSISTANT Denial OBict- in West 



EARN WHAT YOU'RE 
WORTH! 

CALL TODAY WORK TOMORROW We 
■, •'.■!•. •( rt . lul'.t HxecutivHS <Mi '«Mt< b6S9 
t " .1 ■' ■.ir-v. i( fi- tf maneniediamf com 

EXPERIENCED MEOlCAl BILLER toi busy 

Bt .1"!, HilK ^nciDt s ottice MeOicrtff e« 
[.i^-,^„, . .t,q,,,rMr) Excelleni two'^tils F T 

■i..,.|l,.,, .•! ;v'.-ti4'44 



FEMALE 



MODELS WANTED various 
trtshion fvid figure. whateve' 
realiv.- tun Kteas 32r«-35f> "Oi 



FEMALE FIGURE 

O' 'lit iM*iiig 'n[>rt*>K wanted by piioi(;()td 
pnt" Call Peiei al J'O 558-422" 

FILING AND GENERAL OFFICE WORK 
Cortipijle' literate Flexible txjurs oHered 
PT Fa« resume M0-859-OS47 Attention 



GREAT KIDS 

MOTHER 5 HtlPER tnr toddler and new 
pcrr Imi ' 5j 2C' nrjyrvweeK Flexible Posi 
I y. I .yi'iq and patieni aduii Spanish or 
Fre-ut' a plus $6 to start 310 312-6022 

Great Workplace 

PT TeiertidrKete' to' »^(lu<:dliori publishe' 
ne^'ded Hourly and good commissions 
M()rr"rifjsi3 *) dayvweeKl Knowledge ot tor 
-iqr lanquaqe lelptui 310 395 9393 



HIGH ENERGY! 

C.ijsi ir»... Se'vn e Grearwll^ people' En 
ergeti. 'lependabie Want a tun at 
rnt,sp'ie'e wif' qieat $$ Fax Resume 31( 

4.1' "■•tiL 

•MMFDlATt POSITIONS AVAILABLE Fjii 
■imt-.fM'neliis Pre scbooi leacMers Alter 
^! mih; riiocare direoto- and bus dnvers 
Apply <»45(Xi Sfipuiveda Blvd Culver Citv 
." T 63<i ^524 

JOBS, X>BS, JOBS 

C.jstome- service rfdministratiyf' assistant 

'■qa iei:r«taiy and managemeni position 

• Fax resumes IP Nexoplion© 323 735 5840 

JUST SECRETARIAL? 
NOT! 

Beyond ar nppty loM<s' Higfily yisiMe assi 
,• ■•cessary id plan and attend lunctions sit m 
on rrieelings arrange ml i travel cornpose 
edit and type an writings chns«n candidale 
will have rK}(hir>g less tftan extraordinarv 
presence vision and premium Windows 
sfciiis Psrtect groove lor new coMoge grad or 
airecdy-ihcre imI' 35 50K the Placement 
Corrwtnv' Fax 310-459-8221 



Classifieds 
825 2221 



KITCHEN HELP AND SERVERS NEEDED 

lor growing catering company Daytime 
availability a must Welt groomed and inteili 
qent a plus Please call 323-822-9468 

LOOK CLOSELY 

PT WOflK FT PAY Bnght students wanted 
Cuivei City ottice Gerierous salary plus 
commission Good pftone voice Gra 
tiam 310-837 0505e«t 174 

MEDICAL RESEARCH 

Full time and Pad-time research assistants 
needed tor clinical inats sponsored by rnaior 
pbarnnaceulicai companies Great oppou' 
tunny toi pre-med students or ott>ers inter 
ested in medical research Duhes irKlude 
subfccl recruitment study forms completion 
and data entry Good phone voice and com 
puiei sKiHs desirable Earn SiOOO/hou' or 
mure Must have ttexitXe schedule Please 
tax resume to 310-231 7095 Were located 
2 miles south ot campus 

MILLIONAIRE MINDED? 

Fnt'epreiieur seeks tyvo part-time individuals 
tc make $1997 in ttie next two weeks Um 
bedo 1 866-483-0983 



NEED GRAPHIC ART 
STUDENT 

tc work on project with af estaPtished pho 
tographer Looking lor trade witn some cash 
payment lo' updating portfolio graphically 
Will mutually t>enefit tx)lh photographer and 
student s portfolios Julie 310-576-9206 

NEED INTERN to help organise a tnp to Itw 
..'002 Fitm Festival in Cannes Req able to 
riegoliate creativity computer literate pas 
Sion for movies Email C www cine 
2dream com 

OFFICE MANAGER entry level will tram 
full-time M-F 9-6 10 minutes Irom UCLA 
Computer knowledge required Salary/twne 
fits 310-476-4205 

OFFICE MANAGER Small Weslside office 
needs proactive competent creative thinker 
to manage offce full time Must know Word 
Excel Quicken and/or Ouickbooks Fax re 
surrw tc 310-477-0535 

PT and FT Medical Receptionist positiom 
Must nave phlebotomy experience & excel 
lent phone & interpersonal skills Salary 
tMsed on experierKe Excellent Benefits Call 
Mandy 310 274-8353 



/ 



P/T CLERKS 



Santa Monica law tirm seeks two PT Gener 
di Office Clerks Flexible hours but rnormngs 
preferred $7 iO/hi DOE Please call Ida 
310-351 2826 

P/T WRITER/ 
RESEARCHER 

Must 'irtvt ijiiginBe' s<;ience background 
$ii'hourfor maga/ine 310-917 1120 



PART TIME CLERICAL ASSISTANTS Mom 

inq hours 8 12 MTM Call Neil 8000-450 
75flr, Beverly HiHs 

PART TIME DELIVERY DRIVERS Wanted 
fo' Chinese Restaurant Earn $12 $i5/Hour 
Call Kevin at 310-266 1 183 

PART TIME lOhrvwk ExcellenI typing and 
computer skills Medical terminotogy pre 
ferred Fax resume to Un EHuiyam MD 
LAC/USC Medkrai Canter 323 226-8076 

PSYCHOLOGY ASSISTANT lor editing pa 
pers_ Psyctwlogy Master Degree required 
Must know language ot psyrtxjiogy arxj t>ave 
proficient writing and editing skilis Call Sha 
la wofk 310-553-2953 txinw 310-271 -fl9e3 



7800 

Help WUdntea 



RECEPTION/ASSIST 

FT TueS'Sai Sania Monica No experience 
required Eye-doctors office Ask foi AHison 
310 319-9999 Leave message 24 hrs/day 
Must interview m Woodland Hills 

RELAX & IMAGINE 

Research study especially seeking ttiose 
with paniC'disorder/paniL anxiety attacks 
though not required Contact Chris Nikolai 
dis PhD Candidate chns0luHer edu 626 
584-5535 

RETAIL CLERK 

Technical tiookslore BNi Pubhcations Inc 
a leader in technical publications for tfie con 
struction industry tias immediate part-time 
positions available at its WLA location 
S7/I10UI starting Flexible hours convenient 
location near 405/10 Iwys Call Martin 714 
517-0970 or tax resume 714-535-8078 

SANTA MONICA ATTORNEY is looking for a 
FT/PT tile clerk arxl secretary Hours can be 
flexible Must t>e able to type and s fmak 
some Spanish Please call AMta 310-452- 

1441 

SAT INSTRUCTOR VERBAL/MATH BA and 
teaching expenerK:e required Coll 310-3T7- 
4509 

SMOKERS IN GOOD HEALTH 18-45 want 
ed tor nicotine research study administered 
at Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles 
HealttKare System PadKipanis will be paid 
up to $170 for tour visits Call Dr Rkrbard 
Olmsiead at 310-4783711 ext 83631 
leave message 

SPORTS COUNSELOR AND ASSISTANT 
TEACI^R NEEDED School age day care 
center full lime summer emptoyment in Van 
Nuys. Sports Cralts. Tnps Boys Swimming, 
etc Good Salary Lenny 818-894-0330 

STUDENT ASSISTANT $9 75/hr Work stu 
dy'eligit)le General oHice duties/assist in re 
search icoding/data entry) Great opportuni 
ty 10 learn business research Details. 

call 310 794-0422 

* 

TEACH ENGLISH IN FUKUOKA JAPAN 
Start Sept One year Children and adults 
Housing/bonus/airfare Degree needed Fax 
resume to 626-446 3614 



TEACH IN SOUTH 
KOREA 

English Language Teachers Free airfare 
free housing medK:al insurarx:e. paid vaca 
tion severance package No Korean neces 
sary $1400 1500/mo nth Send photo/re 
sumeKoreaConneciO yahoo com BA/BS 
required Travel Asia' 

TWO POSITIONS LAW OFFICE ASSIS 
TANT in Santa Monica PT flexitMe hours 
$10/hr PERS0NAL70FFICE ASSISTANT in 
Pacific Palisades 20 mins from UCLA 15 
30hrs'Wk flexible $10/hr Tami 310-459 
2087 

WANTED PART TIME 
HOUSEKEEPER 

Light Housekeeping. Cook dinner and 
Dishes Monday-Fnday 4 9pm July 30 
Sept 4 $45/day Karen Daytime 323-881 

0330 Evening 310-657 1660 

WLA PICTURE FRAMING SHOP Chartes 
Custom Picture Framing Sales, picture 
framing will train PT Ask lor Charles 310 
474-8861 

WORK WHENEVER, 
WHEREVER YOU WANT 

Outside sales make $$$$ selling cell 
phones lo your fner>ds family and com u k- 
ers 310-444-0555 ext 248 



8100 

Personal Assistance 



PERSONAL/ 
PROFESSIONAL ASST. 

Availat)le to help organise your busy life Ad- 
ministrative assistant personal assistant 
type work Adolf 310-876-1910 



8200 

Temporary Employment 



LOOKi Flag 

FoOtt)aii k.ijnt.iifr> iir orrpitriMiiKi Nuvember, 

3-5 30 3 times'vuk Salary range S2000-2SOO 
for the season Playing/Coaching expanance 
preferred Pleaae Fax Resume to 310-288- 
3286 

LOOKING FOP MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Volleyball coaches for September-Novem- 
ber 3 5 30 3 times/wk Salary range $2000- 
2500 for the season Piaying^oachmg m- 
penence prvterred Please Fax Resume to 
310-288 3286 



UOA 



Every McxKtay 

Your wwce Ibr nmtn and ii fci wii u a m i 

Ad »*), 310) 825-2161 

Edaonoi r«o ; 010^ 025-90Qie 

Of c*opt>y iiaKe>d* a »Mot 




8300 

^Liluiiteer 



VOLUNTEER 
OPPORTUNITIES 

VOLLiNTEERS OiEEDED at Hostelling 
International in SM Meet and interact w/lrav- 
eiers from all around the world' Call Lucy at 
310-393-9913 ext 18 



8400 

Apartments tor Renr 




8^00 

Apartnienls tor Rem 



1 -MINUTE TO UCLA 

1 bdrm turrvstied clean secunty entrance 
large closets laundry room pool tyi lease 
$1200/mo 310-824-1830 

1380 VETERAN 1 bdrm/ iblh $1295(neg) 
Park view rooftop (>ool/|acu2/i intercom en- 
try gated parking laundry all apphaitoas 
Move-in ASAP Cats considerad 310-477- 
5108 

1380 VETERAN^aMHWabm $i795<rwg) 
Pmik view. rooNop paitl|Muz2i intercom en- 
try gated parking, laundry, all appliances 
Mowe-in ASAP Cats considered 310-477 
5108 

424LANOFAiR 

Single apartment available Sept 1 Next to 
UCLA Large room w/separate kitchen and 
bathroom Utilities included $89S/rm>nth 
3 10-459- 1200 

BACHELOR in beautiful, private house 
w/backyard hardwrood fkwrs. and assigned 
parking Only one mile from UCLA Grad 
only South of Wilshire $700 310-470- 
7594 

BEL AIR ADJ HOUSE 3t)drms cat ok. w/d 
hookups, yard red-oak hardwood Hoors. 
large garage $1995 310-395-RENT 
www westsiderentals com 

BEL AM OMMpe pel ok retngeratoi stove 
fiafdwood toors. parkmgAutikties included 
$750 310-395-RENT wvww mrestsideren 
tals com 

BEVERLY HILLS ADJ 142BEDROOM 
$M5&UP LARGE UNUSUAL CHARM 
SOME SPANISH STYLE W/HARDWOOO 
FLOORS ONLY 1/2 BLOCK TO PICO BUS 
310-839-6294 

BEVERLY HILLS AOJ Pico/Crescent 
Heights area 2bdrm/2Mh Nsw ho w Front 
and backyard w/Japanna gMtfMi Wash 
er/dryei A/C $1795 David 323-936-1449 

BEVERLY HILLS spacious apartment walk 
in closets t)nght utilities irKluded $875 
r westsiderentals com 310 396-RENT 





ttt 


1 GLENROCK 1 


APARTMENTS 


^ 


GLENROCK 


■ •J 


AND 


^ 


LEVERING 


« 


-- Single. 1£2 

Bedrooip Apartments 


t^ 


- 3 Blocks to Campus 


9 


- Rooftop Sundeck t 
Spa 


1 


- Fitness Room 


■fe 


- Study Lountte 


V 


- Laundry Facilities 


M 


- Gated .Assisned 
Parking 


^ 1 


- Individual alarm 
systems 


■••1 


MUCH, .MUCH MORE! 




RESERVE YOUR 




APARTMENT NOW! 




SUMMER 01 




FALL 01-02 



BEVERLY HILLS spacnus. great ktcalnn 
prvt rm patio a/c 310-395-RENT 
wmrn westsiderentals com 



BRENTWOOD 

NO«TH OF WILSHIRE spacious 
3bdrm/2bih upper w/ bateony New dwh 
washer refrigeraior stove etc Quiet 8unit 
bidg w/ garden aundeck $2295 11 921 
Goshen Ave M Open Sunday or by appt 
310-571-0293 

BRENTWOOD ADJ. 

2bdmV2Mh $1490 Lease to two No pets 
Naar Wilsh<re/Bundy/UCLA Bright . upper 
wrth Balcony 1236 McOaMan Dr 310-826- 
8461 

BRENTWOOD apartment pet ok ctoae lo 
shops and restaurants $600 310 395 
RENT www westSNterentals com 

BRENTWOOD spacious guest house, bra- 
place $690 310-395 7368 wwwwestsidar 
eniats.com 

BRENTWOOD $1780 2bd«)th front, bal 
cony retrigerator/stove/dishwasher car- 
pet/drapes parking laundry no pals, near 
LX:la byappt. 11728 Mayheld •1.310-271- 
6811 

COZY 2 BEDROOM ' bath $1240 Brent- 
wood Ad| Near Wilshire/freeway/UCLA 
Lease to two No pets Patio 1333 Barry 
Avenue 310-826-8461 

CULVER CITY DUPLEX cat ok yard, sate 
and quiet nei gH b u rtaod. uillfeaa mdudad 
310-395-RENT <imm f miililinniBla.com 

FURNISHED STUOtO APT S625Ano. di- 
posit $400 UtiMies included, quiet 6 month 
mm 5 mil from campus Pool Linda Alvarez 
manager310-837 3556 



Lu«ur> Apartments ai "the Heart 0I Westwixxf" 



^g^ 



M^Kf LA. living at its best.. 




♦ Close to theatres, shops & restaurants 

♦ Beautiful architectural deuits throughout 

♦ One & two bedroom apartment homes 
I ♦ New designer interiors 

♦ Gourmet kitchen 

♦ Buih in appliarKies '— 

♦ State-of-tfte-art fitness center 

♦ Roof-top sun deck & spa 

♦ Controlled access & gated parking 

♦ Extertsive Resident servicet 



Call Today! 

(310)479-6205 
10983 Wellworth Ave. 
Los Angeles, CA 90024 

theplaza#rwsdby.com A 




Displny 
^06-30 



Daily Bmin Cbisiufie^ 



Moiidjv. Juh lb. 2(N)I 23 



8^00 

ApartnierMv fcir R^-n' 



84^00 



Annrtfiif iif- I'lr R» 



84^00 

Apartments for Retti 



8^00 

Apartnteiils for Rem 




^ BRENT MANOR 
APIS 

Avoid Wcstv^H^MJcl rents 
I mile to UCLA 

SinglfN 

I &'2 Bedrooms 

Potil. Near buK linr 

No f>ets 

1235 Federal Ave. 

Near Wilshirt- Blvd 

.(310)^77-7237. 

* 1 M^ 



Casablanca West 
Available NOW 

1 Bedrooms from S1195 
Bachelors S795 



530 Veteran 
208-4394 



8^00 

Apaanients lor Rent 



WLA/PALMS 

APARTMENT RENTALS 

CALL 4 FREE LISTINGS 

AND SPECIALS 

Bacheiors'Singies— sume w/utiiities paid 
pool gated $696-895 IDdrm $950 1096 
many w/fiieplaces. luxury and moi« 2bdrm 
$1J95$1796 many w/dishwashers t>alco 
ny A/C and more 3bdrm $1396 2296 Call 
for tree listing 310-276-8999 



8600 

Condo/Towntiouse for Rent 



WALK TO UCLA 

Luxurious Higfi rise cimdi on Wilshiie ft 
Shelby ibd/i 76 bath Spectacular view 
10th floor $1750 Available B/2 81H 991 
8234 



8700 

CoiidO/lovwnhouse tor Sale 



IMAGINE OWNING WILSHIRE Comdor/Hi 
Rise single lor 2bdrm $115K $250K Walk 
to-UCLA/Village 24hr/security Spectacular 
views pool iacu;;i sauna, valet service 
Also 3bdrm $425K Agent-Bob 310-478 
1835exl 109 



Westwood Village 

Vei7 large appartments for 

September Ist occupancy 

Built in kitchen. 

Balconies/ Patios. 

Pool, elevator. 

controlled-access building. 

subterranean parking 

2 BR/ Ibaih rrom$1,S00 

Pei^ecf for 3 f erMmfs 

1 n appl> comr t«i an applkalinn 

nH-etiiiK I uesdav or WedneMla^ 

Juh 17 or 18. 10 AM or 2 PM 

691 Lev«rir«g Avenu* 
(310) 550-8701 




LARGE 2BD/2BA Upper corner unit $1850 
Near UCLA Has balcony/full kitchen walk-»i 
cloaan. galad anny. fr^noMh lease okay 
Claan. quit Hotantf:3iO-3g0-46i0 

LARGE 3eED/2BATH 0«»ner's unit Large 
bakx>ny fireplace, and wet bar All apptianr- 
es Gated entry ctose to UCLA on BractHon 
$2150 Roland 310 390-4610 

LARGE LOFT APARTMENT Fndge dMh- 
washer stove A/C. parking 10-min walking 
dMiance 10 LK:lA $1250/monlti 310-206 



IMRACLE MILE/BH 
ADJ. 

Huga duplex 1 400 sq It 
yard-t-private garden 
inOi charm all raalorad Central a/c sp 
cuflly ayatem dtshwaahet. washer/dry e 
hookups, hardwood floors firapiace Pets 
OK http //hometown ad com/|Chri8home 
323-934-2900 



SANTA MONICA house unf 2t>drTns. tiard- 
wood floors large ctosets. yard $1750 310 
395-RENT wwrw westsiderentals com 

SANTA MONICA pet ok. 2tx)rm retngerator 
stove, partung $1195 310-395-RENT 
«M*w westsiderentals com 

SANTA IMONICA Pnrt rm retngerator. stove 
month to-month $450 310-395-RENT 
wiww westsiderentals com 

SAKTfA MONICA STUOtO. S875 
market/bus. street parkmg. 
Garage. $i50/month ai 
I4lb Street 310-471-7073 

SANTA MONICA Unf 2bdrms w/d hookups, 
yard $950 310 395-RENT wrww weslsider 
antalscom 

SANTA MONICA Fumistied Ibdrm pool 
gated parking utilities paid $980 310 395 
RENT www westsiderentals com 

SANTA MONICA NORTH OF WILSHIRE 
Nice Ibdrm. upper Stove fndge Large pa 
tio Parking Great kx:alion Near Ocean 
Sunny f<4o pets $1250/mo 323-462-0507 

VENICE beach apt 1/2 Mock to beach 
Ibdrm ocean view utihties paid $895 310- 
395-RENT www nvestsiderentals com 

WALK TO UCLA WESTWOOD 

Ibdrm/lMb 2bdnn/2t>tti Pool, lacuzzi walk 
m ctoaats. fireplace fuli-kitclien gated ga- 
ra(e irtstam broadband avail wwwkellon- 
loaiarscom 310-206 1976 

WEST LOS ANGELES 2bdrms big 
brightftairy rooms Parking $895 310 395 
RENT www westsiderentals com 



t^. 



Wesrw<K)d Village 

AAA Kellon Avr 
(3I(» 2<^>H-Hfi«S 

1 Bedroom from $1225 

2 Bedroom from $1700 

Extra large luxury units iiKlude 

• Fully equipped kitchen 

• Central heating and atr 

• Extra closet space 

• \Mett>ar in selected units 

• Priwate tialcony 

• 2 Bdroms have 2 tjaths 

• Intercom entry & gated parking 



\i 



WESTWOOD CONDO 

Newly rerrxxleled 2 bedroom. 1 5 bath unit 
marble arx) wood hnisnas Full kilctien and 
closets Overlooking garden pool and jacu; 
71 Pnvaie parking arxl 24 hour security Op 
postle W Hotel at 969 Hiigard Ave at Wey 
bum Quick walk to UCLA 310 729-2433 
310-824 3000 e«t 233 



19 



^ 



Integrated Propeny Services. Ini. 



8800 

'"luesthouse tor Rerr 



BRENTWOOD mills sTUUlU GUtST 
HOUSE quiet residential street sunny sale 
easy parking Female non-smoking only 
$1000 Call Nancy Bud 310-4726080 or 
310-447-8675 




NEAR UCLA 1MMI. «MOd floors new paint 
1 yaar laaii SIMMnonlh B unit building 
AyaHaWe now* Betty 310-479-8646 

PALMS IBDRM'IBTH $925/mo Newly 
painted, gated pie rking. iniercom. lacuzzi 1/2 
Mock to UCLA bus Kay 310-842-9127 



480 3BA . LOrr TOUVNMOME. FP. 
CENTRAL AIRA4EAT. GATED OARAQE. 

SEC ALARM CAT Ok 
3670 IMDVALE AVE S248S/1MO 



260. MA Tommn m. . n>. ccnthal 

AIR/HEAT. QAreO OARAQE. 

SEC ALAMM CATOM 

M14FARtSDR $13B5/MO 



PALMS Single apt tfom 
$600/$700daposit i-yai 
Ing .carpets vert 
8am 5pm 



, 1 -bdmi $700. 
Stove re 
310«)7 1502 LM 



SANTA MONICA 

Stove large doaatt flSM 

antalscom 



SANTA MONICA apartment, pet ok ctoae 10 
baach S675 310-305-nENT wwwwaatart- 
i.com 




WESTWOOD PLAZA 

GREAT SUMMER 
DISCOUNT 



tochetors S52S-S820 

Singles S750-S1 200 

1 Bedroom ..$1000- SI 200 

termavaUaMe. 

31 0-208-8505 



Open Housr Mon Sat 10 4 Ml 

P10)391-t07t 



SANTA MONICA ap«»tn»ant. pet ok yard 
parking. utiktMS indudad 310395-RENT 
w«Mir iwestsidareniais com 
SANTA INONICAapartmant.iawan Moots 10 
tliataHfi, ywd, uHMlat mcMitma «M6 310- 
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SANTA MONICA I 
ar slove 




Ibdrm refng 
310 396RENT 



SMTM MONICA houaa Ibdrm cat ok yard 
$1095 310 395-RENT 
icom 



Summer THscount<i 

Single $950 $1045 

1 BD $1145 $1395 

2 BO $1645 

2 BD w/loft $201 5 

660 Veteran 
20S-2251 



WESTWD. WALK UCLA 

Small 2t>ed/ibath $1575 lbed/ibth $1410 & 
up Parking stove refrigerator laundry 
room Avaitat>le end ol August Beautiful 
ttardwood floors-carpets Large 2t)ed/it>ath 
beautiful hardwood ttoors $1850 310-824 
2112 

WESTWOOO 

Bachelor One Bedroom Spacious with 
B,il(:ony Near campus 310-444-1478 

WESTWOOD 

Naw ui apartment 2 miles to campus 
Pnme location Private entry $950 Female 
pretenad 310-475-9145 

WESTWOOD APARTMENT 1 bedroonvi 
bath utilities included, pool & laundry NK:e 
clean A quiet Vacancy July ist. Must see' 
$1150/monl^ 1 year lease 310 208 3797 

WESTWOOD bachelor utikties included 
$500 310-395-HENT www westsideren 
tals com 

WESTWOOD guest houaa. (tog ok reing 
eralor stove a/c utilities ift c ludad $750 
310 396-RENT w¥»w yuastsiderentals com 

WFSTWOOO Prvt rm distiwastier balcony 
.1 ^ dosels parking inckided S383 310 
395 RENT www westsidarantals com 

WESTWOOD TWO STORY DUPLEX 2 
Bedrooms One Bath Parking Slove 
Retngerator Hardwood floors f^ar LJCLA 
Transportation $i600up 1385 Midvale 310- 
454-8211 



WESTWOOD VILLAGE 
TOP LOCATION 

Small i-txtrm $i075/m6nth /Ui utilities and 
one parking included Days 310-475-7533 
evenings 310-659-4834 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE MIDVALE N OF 
LEVERING LARGE i AND 2-BDRM APT 
GARDEN VIEW DINING ROOM UNIOOE 
CHARM FRONT AND REAR ENTRANCE 
310-839-6294 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE Unturmshed i-bed 
room, $1400, 10990 Strathmore Furnished 
Ibdrm $1350 547 Landtair 1 year lease 
No pets Available Sept 310-4717073 

WESTWOOD Bactieior S79S uiihties paid 
no parking i-l>adroom. $1400 3-car park 
ing. 10943 RoaMmg. 1-yaar lease no pels 
available July 310-471-7073 

WESTWOOD SPACIOUS ONE BEDROOM 
$il25up Dinning area stove relndgerator 
2 Bedroom duplex $2000 Parking Laundry 
Walk UCLA 11095 Strathmore 310-454 
8211 

WESTWOOO 2BDRM/2BATH $1450 AND 
UP TILE KITCHEN STEPDOWN LIVING 
ROOM HIGH CEILING CHARM 1 MILE 
SOUTH OF WILSHIRE SOME W/BAL 
CONY 310-839-6294 

WESTWOOD 2bdrms 2baths retngerator 
stove, balcony, bright 2 car parking $1450 
310-396 7366 www westsiderentals com 

WESTWOOD Walk to UCLA 2bdrrTv'2bth 
gaied parking rooftop spa. quiet building, 
accepting reservations for Fall $2150 and 
up 512 Veteran 310-208-2655 

WILSHIRE STUDIO Great Location in 
Westwood Eiectncily and water paid Secur 
ity building Valei parking A/C Wash 

ei/Dryer Dishwasher/Refridgeraioi 

$1275/rt>o 310-471-7577 213-840-2676 



8900 

House tor Rent 



CENTURY CITY Apanmeni pel ok reing 
eralor large closets Diigni gated parking 
$725 310 395-RENT www westsideren 
tals com 

LARGE HOME 2bdrms/i large batti Pnvaie 
fenced yard liardwood floors Newly paint 
ed Garage /V/C fireplace i-year lease 
Close to UCLA $2200 310 203-0406 

SANTA MONICA guest house large umt re 
frigerator slove blinds $895 310-396 
RENT www westsiderentals com 



9300 

Room tor Help 



EXCHANGE 
ROOM/BATH 

Ctoee to school Fcr Hhrs Light household 
tasks and conversation m Italian Spanish or 
French (Female preferred) 310-472 d9i 7 



GAYLEY MANOR 
ARTS 

Large. Clean 
Singles St I RedrtHtms 

Across ttie Street from UCLA 

WaHc to Village 

Near Le Conte 

No Pets 

729 Gayley Ave. 

(310)208-8798 



Ti 



n 3ft 

LEVERING ARMS 

Large Sunny 

Singles ^ 1 Bedroom 

Apartments 

W.ilk lo S< tiiMjl ami A'tllajii- 
Nn rvts 

(310) 208-3215 

667-66<^) Levennc Ave. 
Ncardlcnrik-k 

« M 



9UOO 

Room (or Rent 



LOOKING FOR TWO clean e.i . , ^en 

ous grad students to share large 3 
t)drm/2bth w<25y'o outgoing professional le 
male Spacious huge yard wastier dryer 
two-car garage $550/010 '» utilities Sep 15 
213-798-0446 

LOVELY PRIVATE ROOM BATH AND 
PARKING tri Santa Monica TownhouSf 
Quiet Student Non Smoker Good fteigh 
borhood Convenient to transponation 
$750'month 310-828-7960 

PRIVATE GUESTROOM 

WESTWOOD'WALK UCLA Deautifui House 
w/private entianEe'bath'hackyard Laun- 
dry/Kitchen privileges N S female tenant 
$755-»utilities 310 44b 9556 

ROOM FOR RENT IN BEL AIR Privaje bath 
Kitchen Pnviiages etc Ouiet Area Grad 
Student Preffered 310-476-4901 

WANTED Ouiet male graduate student 
Lovely furnished bedroom w/m<crowave and 
fridge A/'C near bus Lease, qwet relerenc 
es $500/mo- utilities included 310-312 
0669 

WEST LA/PALMS Female Roommate need 
ed in 2txJrm'2 5bth condo Gated under- 
ground parking washer/dryer in unit partial 
ly-furnistwd SB50/monm-»utililias 310386 
8824 

WESTWOOD Professional/student to share 
large Jbdrm duplex t)alcony fireplace disb- 
washer wasrier/dryei Excellent location 
$750/mfh . 1 '3 utilities 310-477-8922 



9500 

Roommates-Private Room 



ASIAN'OUIfT'CLEAN/MALE Near bus 
stop Westwood/Picn 3 mo mm stay Rf 
quired 2 leiaiaii L a * Prival«> bedroom sfiarp 
bafti $395/montfi w/iitiliti>s kitcben pru 
$40.dav 310-4-75-8787 

CULVER CITY $325'mo Small private 
I on- share t)ath Prater very docne non 
smoker gentleman Ptaaaa can Jim 3tO- 
390 1450 



uiassiTieas 
R25 22?1 



Displa' 



24 Monday, July 16. 2(K)I 



Daily Brum ClassifiMl 



Daily Brum SiporU 



Monday. July 16. 2001 25 



9500 

Roommates-Private ^ , •- 



LOOKING FOf) 1 -2 u<isyguiny>cl«a>vmorcii 
lysound students Share 2tx)rm/2t>tti West 
mxM apt w/2maie& Parking A/C DSL 
Ldrge livingroom separate phonelir>e 
Smins to UCLA AvailaOle upcoming school 
yeai 310208 9643 

WEST LA Loft BeOroom Private Balcony 
Share Ddthroom Fireplace Secured entry 
ana parking NcKi-smoker Likes small-dogs 
Femdie Prelerred 575'mc 310-6217070 



9600 



«;hHrfri Rm. 



LOOKING FOR M/F to share master bed 
room in luxurious condo MNe from UCLA 
Washer/Dryer Fully -lumished S400/mo 
Available 8/1/0112/31/01 Call FJenee 3iO 
9960286 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 

403 LANDFAIR 1 icj 2 roommates needed 
Jacu^2i parking balcony available Ex 
iremeiy close to campus Lease starts m Au 
gust Rem negotiable Call Bobby 310-206- 

0190 



9700 



926 GAYLEY Wa«( to campus Westwood 
lbdrm/lbth parking lemale roommate 
hardwood Moors Avaiiabte 6/19 mid-Sept 
$295/monlh ImeMa 310-206 5184 

FALL SUBLETto share 2bdm^ apanment 

with 3 nonsmoking males on Gienrock 

$375/mo Sept to December 310-826 
9693 



9700 



WESTWOOD APT. 

Housemawe wanted lor Fall Luxunously 
spacious Smin walk to UCLA Single 
room/own bath $l020/month Share 
S6i0/month Male ptaierrad OaniflieiS 
618-2441. .. 



9700 

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Displflv 
206-3' 



MAGK 

From page 2S 

In .^6 minutes against the Noung 
Ciuns. a mix of NBA and NKL stars. 
Magic managed a triple-double with 
2(1 ptmils. 12 rebi>unds. and 10 
assists. numhcr> all t(H) lamiliar to the 
4.4(K) plu> tans on hand to witness the 
spectacle ' 

Yet there were als«> moments when 
a vers mortal Magic forced the ill- 
adMscd pa>> Kvcn the nu>si nostal- 
gic oi spectators n«>ticed times where 
the 41-year-old Magic lound himself 
winded 

Several members ol the ^ourtg 
(iiins squad. San hrancisci> 49crs 
wide receiver lerreli Owens and for- 
mer Brum standout l.d ()'B;innon. 
though, lell like Magic could hold his 
own in toda> s NB.A 

"Magic knows the game of basket- 
ball.' said Owens, who in his first 
stmt m the SPl. drew the unenviable 
task ol delcnding the future Mall ol 
Famer. "Magic (could definitelv 
come back) He could probabK pl.iv 
anybodv s game at this ptimt 

"Today, he was unbelievable." 
6'Bannonsajd ""Heendedupwitha 
triple-diHJble those just di>n't come 
to anybody He's a good player, 
always has been, always will be " 

Magic himself was far less recep- 
tive to the proposition of staging an 
NBA comeback 

""One more, huh''."hc asked smil- 
ing. **lt's not about what i want to 
do I would love to do it. its jusi my 
schedule is so crazy You lorget. Im 
nmning a $200-$30() million compa- 
ny. I'vegot todo what rvegt)iodo""" 
Magic's opinion on Jordan's 
comeback was even firmer 

"I really don't want him to come 
back." he said ""Crt^sover. jump- 
shot, hand .still up in the air. that s 
how we all remember him against 
Utah I don't want anything to mess 
with that (legacy ) Where can you go 
from the greatest'' I don't know 
where you can go but down " 

Magic's one-shot deal appearance 
in the SPL spares basketball fans 
everywhere from asking the same 
questions about him 



LEAGUE 

Front page 2§ 

ing day I become more comfortable 
with my teammates and coaches, so 
things can only get better Irom here " 

One of the most inspirational per- 
formances of the day came from 
UCLA alumnus F.d O'Bannon 
O'Bannon. who led UC'L.A to its last 
NCAA championship, was selected in 
the first round of the 1995 NBA draft 
by the New Jersey Nets and cut from 
the team a lew years later Sinc-e that 
time. O'Bannon has been bouncing 
around in small independent ba.sket- 
ball leagues, living from paycheck to 
paycheck, trying to keep the flame of 
his N BA dreams alive 

O'Bannon relies on the ht>pc that 
scouts will notice his performance and 
give him that second shoi the majority 
of the players m the SPL arc hoping 
for Amid .HI of the commotion sur- 
rounding celebrities like Johnson. 
Siux>p Dogg. Gonzale? and another 
NKL player. San Francisco 49cr wide 
iHit Terrell Owens. O'Bimnon turned 
in a gritty 2b point perlormance. 

"My life has been a long and wind- 
ing road over the past five years. " 
O'Bannon said "But on the other 
hand, what d<K*sn"t kill you will make 
you str(»nger I may be down right 
now. Km Im not done fighting for m\ 
dream Im not dead yet and I have the 
confidence in myself that I will sur- 
vive " 

There arc many dilTercnt roads con- 
verging in Long Beach The Pyramul 
stands as a training site for some, .i 
way to alleviate summer boredom lor 
ofhcrs. but for Ld O'Biinnon and hurv 
dreds like him it stands as a beacon ol 
ht>pe that their hoop dreams will turn 
to reality 




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From page 27 ' ; 

the OlympK CharteT. which nwirfions 
goal> like respect lor universal tunda 
mental ethical principles" and "the 
preservation o( 

human dignit\." ^^^^""""^^ 
which Bei)mg is 
mm responsible 
to embrace 

Perhaps the 
massive increase 
in globalization 
and interdepen- 
dence will pro- 
vide the impettR 

to embark on a 

long road of 

reform in China But a statement from 
the state-operated New China News 
Agency points toward a nation intent 
im bolstering international prestige by 
tipping the balance of power in its 
favor rather than a nation interested in 
remaking itself in a democratic mold 

When the periodical says. 
"Winning the host right means win- 
ning the respect, trust and favor of the 
intematK>nal community," one can 
hope that the virtues mentioned repre- 
sent goals rather than assumptioatb 

Strange to think that all of this 
came not from armies or ideology, but 

liiMiUE 

FfompiQe^B 

appeamnce on (he court and uied his 
status to help draw attenlHm to the 
unestaMnhed piayers. 

"Helping out the younger guys is 
the sin^ most important thing that I 
have done here today." Johnson said 
"For many players, this league is their 
chance, their big shot Looking good in 
front of the scouts from both the N BA 
and abroad ts the way to get another 
shot or get their first chance tD liaMaw 
their basketball dreams " 

Johnson, wmose team to the dehght 
of the crowd ^tKluded rap mainstay 
Snoop Dogg. also played the role of 
teacher to the unknown players, teach- 
ing them about the subtle nuances of 
the game like defensive footwork and 
mental preparation. 

One player that Johnson singied out 
IB having excellent footwork and a 
good all-around game was ex- 
California Bear star and current 
Kansas City Chief Tony Gonzalez 
The Al-fro tight end am't shake the 
urge inside of him and com- 
tfeat by .pk^iac i" ^ SPL every 



The acceptance of an 

Olympic host bid carries 

with it the responsibility 

of carrying the 

Olympic spirit. vS 



from the right to host sporting events. 
Sports have given China the oppor- 
tunity to change, and hosting the 
Olympics thrusts upon a nation the 
strict scrutiny ol the rest of the world 
While the KX is supposedly not a 
political organization, its games can 

trigger both unity 
^^^"■""■^^" and terror among 
the world s 
nations 

Ignorance byfhe 
KX of an issue 
like human rights 
IS. in Itself, a polit- 
ical statement 

For the 
Olympic spirit, if 

— for nothing else. 

China must 
diamge. Seven years are more than 
ample for China to turn around and 
show the work! just how far it wM 
have come - although 65 years ago. 
the Olympic spirit didn't provide the , 
spark for change in Germany. 

So now. in the parlance ofbaiket- 
ball. one of China s favorite i 
the ball is in its court. 



whiK Gommb ■ |Awi| in 
for the NFL Kaion. he's ako impra*- 
mg NBA scouts after performances 



IS a cc u s ioi 'i itd to wiMiiiy abom 
less important things Mw the XFL He 
•npects your opinion on this divisive 
issue arvd «velcomes comments at 
a9ase#uda.edu. 



like his 26 point. 1 1 rebound outbur* 
on Saturday There arc rumors that , 
Gonzalez might experiment with tht 
NBA after the next football season. 

"A lot of people are talking about it 
now that I'm starting to put up some 
mimbers." Gonzalez said "As far as 
playing two sports is concerned. I'm 
just playing it by ear and trying to see 
what happens. If it happens it happens, 
and if it doesn't. I'm not going to loae 
any sleep over it " 

One player sent to the SPL to hone 
his skills and prepare for the NBA was 
UCLA alumnus Earl Watson, who 
was selected in the second round by the 
Seattle Supersonics Watson is a candi- 
date for a roster spot and a position 
backing up current Sonic point guard 
Gary Payton. 

Fresh out of college. Watson set the 
tempo for the Seattle game against the 
Dallas Mavericks' team, notching 10 
points and as many aaiMi. tapile iK 
fact that his playing tame ««i oMt Aart 
when he took ■ forearm to the noae. 

"In this summer league and in every 
game until I estaNish myself. I will play 
for each moment, take it one day at a 
tine, aad liaaq's try to be better tliMi I 
«« iM Ike IM game WaHon mM. 
'^ far the tramilion to 
ball has been smooth Whh each i 



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Daily Brum Sports 



Monday. July 16, 2(K)1 27 



Some question Tone's decision for All-Stars 



L: In li^ht of recent 
losses, owner savs rest is 
moTt important tor players 



The Associated Press 



PHILADELPHIA Ncn* York man- 
ager Joe Torre denied thai Dwner Cieorgc 
Sleinbrenner told him not to take tcx) 
many Yankees to the All-Star game 

Torre, speaking to rept»rters before the 

Yankees played the Phillies at Veterans 

-Stadium on Sundas. said Sleinbrenner. in 

vibe past, has expressed concern over how 

-«nany Yankees went to the All-Star game 

"He didnt tell me that this year." Torre 

said " He likes to sec a lot ol guys make it 



Sports -and politics once again resume 
their uncomlonablc relationship 

?he Olympics themselves have hern no 
siranfers lo.controversy. dating hack to 
1936 when "Hitler's games " in Berlin sav^ 
international credihilitv <or was it timidi- 
ty'') lent to the fascist Na/i government 

That year. African American Jesse 
Owens, an alleged inferior to Hitler n ma.s- 
ter race, made a mocker> ol Na/ism when 
Ik won four gold medals on a single day as 
tfie huhrer watched in disgust 

And whik- the world in 2(K)I seems far 
from the international lalloui of the fascist 
regimes ol the mid-2(>th ccntur\. many pre- 
dict that China s super-power vision with 
its denial of rights to it.s own people com- 
pk;te with the inioleruncc that brought us 
such vivid memories as that of 1 lananmen 
Square. will take center stage 

Wek;ome to international controversv 
sports 



\ }\ * \ \ 'ii i I k V 

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Bruin is 

looking for 



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for the summer 
and school year. 

* * * 
Both jobs 

are an integral part 

of the newspaper's 

production 

and are 




For more information 
about this opportunity 
please e-mail 
Micluiel Falcone, 
Managing 
Editor 

mfalcone@mcdia.ucla.edu 
orcall (310) 825-2167 



"The All-Star Garne has 

turned into too much of a 

festival" 

G »or9< Steinbrenncr 

Owr>er, New York Yankees 



because its a credn to the team, but he 
also wants them to rest " 

Steinbrenner questioned whether 
Torre made the right decision by selecting 
seven Yankees because the team lost its 
first two games after the break to the 
Marlins b\ a combined score of 20-4 



The KX' had other c-hoices. but its 1993 
4lecisiun to award the 20(H) games to 
^dne> bv only a slim margin of two votes 
over Beijing meant it had painted itself 
mio a comer by legitimizing Beijing as a 
potential host 

Toronto, long considered a desiraMe 
and able host city, lost its chance when its 
mayor had the audacity to decline a pro- 
motional visit to Africa wrhen he pictured 
htmsdf. "in a piM of boiling water with all 
thc>e natives dancing around me " The 
KX braveK denounced the actions of a 
leader with no regard lor human tolerance 

Then it gave the games to Beijing, not 
exactl> a bastion of the human spirit 

And now. like it or not. China s best 
C^portunitv to K>in the world stage has 
come from sports an institution hesitant 
to politici/c- ii.scll and built on the premise 
of human individuality and achievement - 
premises that tall on deal ears in the 
Chinese government 

Granted, the dedication of the Chinese 
people can hardlv he questioned TTieir 
quest lor the Olympics, which included a 



"The All-Star Ciame has turned into 
t(H> much of a festival.' Sleinbrenner said 
in Sunda> s Newsdav "I told lorrc he 
shouldn't have taken so man> people for 
the team The> looked like thev needed 
sleep winning the World Series is 
achat's important, not the All-Star game ' 

Torre was criticized b> some for pick- 
ing so many Yankees to pla\ in last week s 
All-Star game in Seattle 

Closer Mariano Rivera pulled out 
because of an ankle mjury but the three- 
time defending ch^impions still had six 
representatives pitchers Roger Clemens. 
And> Petlitlc and Mike Stanton, catcher 
Jorge Posada, shortstop lX*rek Jeter; and 
center fielder Bernie Williams. 

The Yankees beat Honda 5-4 in M 
innings Saturday to snap the skid 



misunderstanding in 199.^ when they 
thought thev had been awarded the gan^p, 
has been a Ump and arduous one 

Beginning todav. stadiums will heliwit 
and roads w ill be paved, but most impor- 
tantK. China will be thrust into the interna- 
tional spotlight It has coveted for so long 
That the Chinese see Beijing s selection as 
an international referendum ivdear That 
they see It as a mandate tor reform is not 

A crucial component ol Chinese culture 
li stabilitv This resistance to change kx>ms 
ominouslv as the KX responds to criti- 
cism with the unrealistic hope that the fish- 
howl around China over the next seven 
years w ill trigger sweeping changes 

And whether or not one believes China 
desires Ko make an> substantive changes 
regarding the wa\ it treats Us own citi/ens, 
one thing is cv ident the acceptance of an 
Olympic host bid carries with it the respon- 
aibilitv (if carrving the Olympic spirit 

Vne brutal purging ol a religion like 
Falun (iong is simpK not consistent with 



BASKETBALL BRIEF 



UCLA greats 
inducted to 
Hall of Fame 

IK LA basketball greats 
Jamaal Wilkes and Don 
Barksdale were two o^ 12 
athletes inducted into the 
African American-Fthnic 
Sports Hall of lame Julv "^ 
in Oakland. Calif 

"It was an easy choice." 
said Arif Khatib. the hall's 
founder and president "I 
nominated and chose each 
o\ them because I wanted 
%o set the precedence ot 
what the hall is about " 

The players were award- 
ed plaque-trophies at last 
Saturday s inaugural cere- 
monies and will have dis- 
plays dedicated to them in 
the hall Pam Barksdale- 
(jore accepted the posthu- 
m»>us ht)nor for her broth- 
er, who died in 199^ 

The hall, established in 
July 2(MM). serves to honor 
minority athletes who have 
had a positive effect on 
sports and society 

"One must have 
excelled on the field of 
play, but also must have 
demonstrated a sense o{ 
community. " Khatih said 
Both of these gentlemen 
qualified under that crite- 
ria 

"Additionally, both ol 
them are outstanding 
human beings, and DCLA 
IS an outstanding inslitu- 



tum.' he added 

Wilkes, a forward i.>ii 
the dominant I97((s 
UCLA teams, was a iwo- 
time All-American 197V 
74 He went on to play with 
the Golden Stale Warriors. 
Los Angeles Lakers and 
Los .Angeles Clippers dur- 
ing a 12-year NB.A career 
Wilkes was the Rookie of 
the Year in I97S. earned 
three trips to the All-Star 
game and played on four 
NBA championship 
teams 

Wilkes graduated with a 
degree in economics and 
went on to become a finan- 
cial consultant He is cur- 
rently vice president ol 
basketball operations for 
the ABA s L*»s Angeles 
Stars He is heavily 
involved with the Boys and 
Cjirls Clubs o{ America 

Barksdale played as a 
forward ai ICLA in 194'' 
earning second-team All- 
American h<»nors the 
first ever African 

American to do so. He 
became the first African 
American ti> be selected as 
an All-Star in I95.V 

Barksdale later worked 
on and led Save High 
Schtx»l Sp*>rts. a non-profit 
organization thai raises 
money ti>r high school 
sports programs He died 
in I99.V 

Bri«f compiled by Diamond 
Leung, Daily Brum Senior 
Staff. 







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Daily Brum 



orts 



h< hold ihv (»in u 



Which baseball players can 
fantasN leai;uers rely on for a 
«e(ond-half surge^ The Guru 
tells all online on Wednesday. 



Vl(>n(lj\. JuK 16. 2(M)1 






Women's basketbal gets new TV contract 



AIRTIME: NunilHM of 
•zaiiies broadcasl to rise 
tnmi 2'^ lo t)'^ t)\ 2(K)4 



By Jackie , 

Dailv Brum Contributot 

I iu \( \ \ Miiiicd .1 new 1 1- 
»,..t! ^2iH' iitillntii I'-lcMsion richiv 

s.Ml'Mi.! \Mlh [SI'S i>l1 ,lllt\ " 

vOtii.lt '.ull i!i\i.- the network hri>a(.l- 
>..l^lllli: ».oiiiiiil lit the women •- 
l^a^keth.lll loutn.iiiieiK aionj; with 
ri'othei national ehanipion>iiipv 

\\- vurreni ^ontraet worth "^l" 
tmliioi; o\ei >e\en veai'-. vmII 
cvpiic .itiei the 2tM)|-(l2 reason 
I Sl'\ whklu.iii renegoti.ile .illei 
civih! \caiN will ohtain the rij!hl> 
toi various DniMoii I tnen\ aiul 
women s loiirnarnetitN. ineludini; 
mtloor tiaek ,itul lieiil >oeeei 
nw nMiiini.' and Jnini; tenniv .ind 
\ ijie.hall llouever v\omen'v has 
Mili.i! vv.is ilu priiM.irv (.ompo- 
i\cw 'I itK- [iack:\m 

; his de.i! pies<.'nied the oppoi- 
ii.iiii. ii I Us lo expand our curreiil 
..■ i" ii:i. oi i.oliei;e sports and 
ii'i^rcasi. <ui wi'verajie ot women s 
-p>>ii- ,ii the ^ame lime, hoth o| 
vvhii.!) ue I'-'ei e.in he a hij; part o! 
'ii: L'lowuii: progiamniinu line- 
ii(^ s.nd lo\h Krulewit/. maiuiper 
o! .onimiiiiie.iti.ins lor l.SPN 
I Ik women s loiirnameni will he 
!he lornerslone ol this event, pro- 
odini: lis with the opportiinit\ to 
showcase II like we h.ive never 
.lone hclore 

hei:iniiini; in the 2<K)'(-(i4 ^ea- 
soii the network will broadcast all 
b'- women s h.i-.ketball tournament 
uames nation.ilK, a large leap Irom 
the _"'• i! aired under the preMi>us 
.iiireement Rei:u>nal first- and sev 
I'lid-iound rallies will be piovuled 



COMPARING NCAA BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT CONTRACTS 

The new contract ESPN signed to conttnue carrying the women s baskettwil tournament is an increase of over 600 percent in 
yearly revenue However, the men s basketball tournament CBS tetecasf will pay out over 12 times more than the women's 



Previous 
Women s| 
contract 



New 



I 



7 yedfs, $19 million = $2.71 million per year 




Women s^Hll years, $200 million = $18.1 million per year* 
Contract 



Current 

Mens 

Contract 



1 1 years, $6.2 billion = $563.63 million per year 



100 200 300 400 

millions of dollars per year 

'Contract also grants ESPN television rights for 20 other championships 



500 



600 



b\ I SI'S and FSPN: alonj: with 
pav-pe!-\iew eoserajie lor uaines 
plavcd bv ,iut 
ol-siale teams 

It IS a mon- ^"^^''"~~^~" 
umcntal move 
lor the champi- 
onship .ind It 
will realK put 
Its place as one 
ol the premiere 
collegiate 
spt»rtinp events 
in thecountrs. 
said Scott le 
Rodgcrs the 

assistant director i)l the Division I 

women s basketball champn>nship 

Alontisidc the coverage, the 

ti>urnameni could also see some 



"It is a monumental 

move for the 

championship." 

Scottw Rodgers 

Division I assistant director 



ma|or schedule changes \iTionc 
the possible aheraiions. the games 
would he 

played i>n a 
■"""""^^^'^ S u n d a V - 
lucsday for- 
mat as carlv as 
:(M).V rather 
thun the cur- 
rent hridav- 
Sundctv one 
Discussions 
will be held b\ 
the Division I 



( hampionships Compctilion 
C abinet in Sept 

Joan Bonvicini. the Arizona 
Wildcats women s baskcthull head 



TMMOTHV NGOOMy (rwr S«niat Suit 

coach, noted that the suggested 
shift will eliminate the current 
overlap with men s games, which 
t)blain more widespread attention 
and coverage 

According to Krulewitz. the 
new deal also includes ESPN's 
future promotional package The 
network plans on marketing eoJIe- 
giale athletics over its numerous 
entities, such as FSPN com. ESPN 
Radio. ESPN Classic. ESPN The 
Magazine and ESPNEWS 

"This IS something that gives a 
great deal ot stability and validitv 
lo women s basketball." said LSI 
Lady Tigers basketball head coach 
Sue (iunter "We still have a long 
way to go. but I think it is a step m 
the right direction ■" 



Olympic host 
sdection should 
be mandate for 
chsHige in China 

COLUMN: Gov Wiiitiwi^ many 
human rifthls atrocities fly in 
face of spirit, charter of Games 



Across nK' nMnncrSCBH), fnc win id s 
most popuicHis country was in a fu of 
exuberant j<>y all weekend 

l"he fanatical sports obsession of its 1.!' bil- 
lion inhabitants makes people in Nuc and gold 
wigs l(K)k like well-behaved cricket fans. 

Its naliimal sports teams have won 223 
( H\ mpic medals and 
ranked third last summer 
with ^^) medals in the 
2(KKI Sydney games 

It offers a luscious 
landscape surpasjsed by 
no other ci>untry in the 
world and an equally 
impressive national pride 

And nt)w It ha.s the 
Olympics Great, nghf 

Wr(mg C)n Eriday. the 
international CMympH. 
C ommittee annouiKed 
that Beijing. China will 
hi>si the 2(K»< Summer Ofympic Games. 

The proWcm'' The term "human rights' is 
something ot an oxyrooron to the aulht>ntarian 
Chinese regime thaf-has. according to Amnesty 
International, executed over l.7Q() people in the 
last three months and brutally massacred 
droves ofpt^itical dissidents. 



27 




For mofe information on the Beijing 
Olympic seiection see pt9» 1. 



League offers second chances 




PYRAMID: Summer lets 
pIciNcrs, h(>pefuls take 
lime lo showcase skills 



Magic dazzles crowds with 
'showtime' on court, again 



Former Brum Ed O'Bannon dribbles downcourt fHe scored 
26 points in a Summer Pro League game on Sunday. 



BySnttl 

Daily Brum Reporter 

l()NGBEA(H Here s a rid- 
dle Where can yini find an NBA 
legend i nK>kie an unemployed 
\eteraii a rap star and two NM 
players all in one place'' 

for the answer to the enigma 
l(H>k no t.trther than the Py ramid at 
Idnj- Beach State, where the dil- 
lerent paths of man\ players ei>n- 
\ergcd .ill with the goal ol living 
out their basketball dreams 

The Summer Pro League is .i 
collection {"ti independent and 
NBA sp*<nsorc<f teams that allow 
established players lo hone ifwir 
skills in the olTseas<in and unsigned 
players to showe.is*.- their talent in 
hopes of landing a |ob in the NBA 
and professional leagues all over 
the world This audition pnKcss 
giKs on from July K-29 but 
Saturdays game was special 
Magic Johnson made a onemme 



Sw 



M.H00PS: Johnson says 
l)us\ schedule would not 
allow for NBA comeljack 



By WiM WhitdMni 

Daily Brum Reporter 

LONG BEACH Ten sumn»ers 
have passed since twi> of sports mtwt 
recognizable faces. Magic Johnson and 
Michael Jordan, last shared a court 
together w ith anything at stake 

A decade later both legends, since 
retiied. can t seem to say pixnibye to 
biiskelball While Jordan continues to 
toy with the prospect of leaving the 
Washington Wi/ards front ofTicc for 
another NBA stmt. Johns<in continues 
to nurture younger players via the 
Southern ( alilornia Summer Pro 
League currently competing al Cal- 
Staic Long Beach 

Saturday afternoon. Johnson giddily 
took the n»M)r at the Pynunid with his 
Magic Johnson All Stars (rap mainstay 
SniH)p Dogg among Ihemi and 
unleashed his storied arsenal one more 
time a no-l(H>k feed on a Von- 1 break 
which netted two poinu. a behind the 



■f' # ilk:. 




WSKM 


-» ^ 


^^ It ^ 



San Francisco 49er wide receiver 
Terrell Owens attempts to defend 
: iohffison Sunday. 



back, ov . r-the-head pass that culmmat- 
ed in a dunk Fven Magic's lamed run- 
mng*ho(>k made a cameo For the 
briefest of moments. "Showtime" was 
back. 



UCLA 



DAILY BRUIN 



8er\tng th«» I'f 'LA aimnnunirk MirM** 1919 



Button your fly 

Should the stat*^ Ik' allowed to 
tell you not to pHw-n-ate? 
PAGE IC 



Monday, JiTLY 23, 2001 



www.(|}iilvf>ruin iH'la ifhi 




Flooding delays aid 

Mon* than ri^ht million iM'opU'an- 
alfV'cti'd l>y disasUT in India. 
PAGE 3 




enrolment with dual admissions 



PROGRAM: Critics claim that lack of money prevents 
UC system from implementing regent's passed plan 



MIyBniinStaff 

~ TV VC Board of Regents look 
steps dunng its meeting Thursday lo 
incrcMe the number of transfer stu- 
dents die UC receives, turning to the 
California Community College system 



for 

Under the Dual Admissions Plan, 
which passed by a 14-3 vole, students in 
the lop 4 to 12..^ percent of their high 
school cfans will be granted admission 
to the UC upon compkition of two 
years of lower division courses at a 
community college The plan goes into 



cfTect for the incoming class f-all 2003 
Students who will likety beneTit from 
this plan, university officials say. are 
highmchieving students who attend the 
poorer schools in the state, which lack 
the resources needed to prepare their 
students for a university education 

UC Board of Admiuions and 
Relations with Schtwls Chair Dorothy 
Perry presented the plan to the fxwrd. 
saying it provides a better path to ttie 



UC for certain studenM. <* • .'. 

"This puts the L'C within then^ 
grasp." Perry said 

.Additionally, officials said they hope 
the plan will increa.se the number o( 
African American. Latino and Native 
American students in the system 
Enrolhnent numbers for those groups 
have declined since the Regents' poli- 
cies SP-I and 2 passed in 1995 and 
banned the use of afTirmalive action in 



admis-sions and hirinjz throughout the 
VC The Regents rescinded those pt>li- 
cies at their May meeting this year 

BOARS predicts that the new plan 
will evcntuallv add .^.50t) transfer stu- 
dents lo the I C , with an eslimale ol 
l.fKKI added translers in its first year 

The system presently serves more 
than I3U.0(X) undergraduate students. 

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and the comentionil transfer proqrwi 



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EUGMLEMTOP 

12.5% OF 
GRAOUA'HNG 

CLASS 
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EUGOtiMTOP 

4% OF HIGH 

SCHOOL 



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ELIG«1M 

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ADMISSIONS 



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Tuitkxi for outof-state students rises 



k Money is 
l^nerated to fund T.A.s, 
buildings' maintenance 



MCtOR CNCN/Diri^rRMin 



Daily Bruin Staff 

Out-of-state students attending the 
University of California will have lo 
pay an extra $460 for tuition begin- 
ning Fall 2001 

Fees for nonresident students at 
the UC will rise for the sixth straight 
year, as the UC Board of Regents 
passed the item by a 1 5-2 vote at their 
meeting Thursday 

Nonresident students will pay 
110,702 for tuition - a 4.5 percent 
increase from last year. This figure 
does not include educational, regis- 
tration, student and university fees, 
which vary at each campus 

''Nonresident tuition pays closer 
lo the cost of education because (non- 
resident students) are not paying 
uxes that support thit oait," said 
Anila Cotter, «ssociate regislrar for 
student and faculty services 

CaKfomia residents do not pay 
tuition - the state funds that part of 
students' education expenses 
However, in-itale students nwst still 
pay ediicational, university and cam- 
piia-bMed fees, which have not 




AIHfBNt l**rtil.K «• 



IX Regents Chair S.S««JalM«Mi and UC President 
at a May 16 nrweting in Sar> FrarKisco. 



WdMwd Atkinson, 



increased since 1994. 

For the 2001-2002 academic year. 
UCLA resident undergraduate stu- 
dents will pay S4.I85 in total fees, 
white resident graduate students will 
pay $4,497 

According to the UC Office of the 
l*resident, the out-of-state tuition 
increase will generate $6 million in 
revenue, with $2 million going 
toward subsidizing fees for teaching 
assistants and $4 million toward 
financing debt for deferred mainte- 



nance of buildings throughout the 
UC. 

One of the two dissenting voters. 
Regent Peter Preuss. said that rev- 
enue generated by the increase in 
nonresident tuition is deceiving 

"A lot of oul-o(-slalc students' 
tuitions arc being covered by univer- 
sity funds, so we're taking money 
from the left pocket and putting it 
inio the right pocket. " Preuss said. 



Gonsmjctkm project bkxks popular walcway 



Activities are 
merely initial phase of 
extensive undertaking 



Maintenance work on the plumb- 
ing and electrical wiring in the Men s 
Gymnasium and the Chilled Water 
Liiic Ealension Project have forced 
paAmPians on Bruin Walk to maneu- 
ver around tractors and Kvwheel 
•niy to he deterred from their 
by a fence wnq>ped akmg the 
Meofthe Men's Gym. 
TIk ChiHed Water Line Extension 
Preiact aims to connect the lar|e 
cMM anMer system that provkki air 
aiid oooliai Id iK bMM- 
MicaraanipMiiatfM 
on the iwftfiiNdB. 
a fienced-off area, facihties 



^^rflMa a fc 



workers aia llvmt a trench halfwav 
up the wA iMpenoufh to fit several 
workers. The excavation produces 
approximatdiy eight to 10 truckloads 
of dirt a day and should, according to 
Director of UCLA Energy Services 
Dave JohMMi, be completed by 
Tuesday. 

Johnaen, however. «tescnbed cur- 
rent construction activities as merely 
the first phase in an extensive under- 
taking. 

PhaK MK, which IS scheduled lo 
last from My 2 through Sept 2. will 
lay pipes is the ground stretching 
from the Men's Gym lo the edge of 
Taco Bell Eventually two pipes, each 
24 inches in diameter, will extend the 
iMiftt) froni the Men's Gym to the 
north side afRoyce Hall. 

"Our fripn here." Johnson said, "is 
; one) before the 



turc handled by the UCLA facihties 
Management Office, according lo 
.lohnson. 

"The (University of Cahfomia 
Office of the l^resident) has been pur- 
chasing bonds to bnng the infrastruc- 
ture up to par for all campuses," said 
Gail Cowling, executive officer in tfie 
Office of the Assistant Vice 
Chancellor for Facilities 

UCLA IS heading into its fourth 
year of a five-year plan to maintain 
and renovate buildings and the rest of 
campus 

An average of $14 to $15 million 
per year is offered by the state for 
maintenance projects, targeting 
plumbing, roofing projects, ventila- 
tion systems and roadways. Cowling 
said 

She said that because the majority 
of UCLA's campus was built in the 
l%Os. the stale funds projects for 



The CWM Water Line Extension 
Project is a aiate-funded utilities ven- 



Whataracket! 




Tennis superstar i 



practices at the LATC Sunday 



Daily Bruin Netirs 



Monday. July 23, 2001 



B Monday July 23, 2001 



Daily Bruin 








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$2^ Off 

TUESDAYS 

Excludes Sicillians 



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w/ Free Liter 



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New center offers physical, emotional wellness services 



mnBITS: LCLA is first 
hospital on West Coast to 
bave a specific MS facility 



Daily Bnun Contributor 

UCLA became the first hospital on 
the West Coast to have a facihty specif- 
icallv designed to treat peopte with 
muitipic scler(«>is with the opening ol 
tfie Marilyn Hihon MS Achievement 
Center June 21 

■ The center focuses on physical, 
recreational and emotional wellness 
programs aimed at making patients 
more self sufllcient 

"We don't do things for them, we 
are a tool for people to do things for 
themselves ■' said Center Director 
Stephanie Fisher. 



MS IS a chronic disease where the 
body's own defense system attacks 
myelin, the substance that surrounds 
the central nervous system This 
results m a distortion or interruption 
of nerve impulses to and from the 
brain. People duignosed with MS can 
experience a range of symptoms from 
numbness in their limbs to paralyse 
and blindness 

The Center is a joint program 
between the Southern California 
Chapter of the National Multiple 
Sclerosis Society and the LiCLA 
Department of Neurology 

It currently holds programs to 
increase physical strength such as 
yoga. hydrotherap\ and modified aer- 
obics it also ha!> recreational prcv 
grams like drama, art therapy, ceram- 
ics and outings within the community 

Alan Robinson, the vice provtst of 
Medical Sciences said that the internal 



support that patients get from one 
another is cTucial to the program 

"Patients not only get cared for but 
coming here in a group they care for 
each other." said Robinson, who is 
also the executive associate dean ol 
DCLA's school of medicine. 

Program member Beverly Thomas 
said she appreciates being in an envi- 
ronment with pei>ple who are experi- 
encing the same challenges as her 

"It motivates you to be with other 
people with the similar proWems that 
you have." Thomas said "I like to be 
with other people, just talking and 
sharing experiences " 

Since Its opening earlier this month, 
the center has had eleven members 
attending every Fhursda) 

Fisher said she hopes within the 
next year the center will expand to 
include 25 members attending each 
day. 



The center is luimed in honor of 
Marilyn J Hihon who vsu>. diagnosed 
with MS several years ago and donat- 
ed money for the creation of the cen- 
ter 

Throughout the ceremony. Hilton 
sat by her husband and smiled Her 
s<»n Steve spoke on his mother s behalf 
saying she has always supported chari- 
table activities throughout her life and 
IS happy that her name should be on a 
UCLA facililv because UCLA is a 
leader in the country on MS research 
and treatment 

■ When people are faced with 
tremcndi>us challenges, the biggest 
achievement is saying I will not let this 
disease ptifl me down.'" Steve said 

Center president Leon LcBuffe 
first had the idea to create the MS cen- 
ter after visiting a similar facility in 
Rochester. NY m l«W4 But at the lime 
UCXA said It did not have enough 



spaice for the center 

Tom Sherak. one of the founders of 
the new center, said when he heard the 
center would not be built, he wrote a 
letter to then Chancellor Charles i 
Young expressing hi!> disappointment 

"1 told him I was putting a curse on 
the ba.sketball team.' Sherak said with 
a laugh "UCLA did not make it to the 
final four or sweet 16 ft»r many years 
after that " 

Sherak said he did noi lift the curse- 
on the basketball team until 
Chancellor C arncsak .illottcd space 
for the facility la.si year 

Many of the founders said they 
hope similar centers will spring up 
around the natttm 

"Every .^merK.•an with a disability 
should have a chance to come to a cen- 
ter like thi>." said Department of 
Neurology Chairman Robert C. 
Colling .:. 




, UC sdentists 
find promise 
ffi similar HIV 
vacdne^ tests 

VMUS: Study shifts focus 
from rrealinp antilxjdies 
to proNidinp proleclion 



Khstcho Shahnazarian accepts a blood donation from Judy Schoop at a blood drive in Ackerman Union last February. The Los Angeles 
community is suffering from a shortage of blood donations. 

LA suffers from low number of blood donors 



SHOfTTAGE: Decrease has 
caused postponement of 
Hon -emergency surgeries 



Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

The blood centers at the UCLA 
Medical Center and the Harbor- 
UCLA Medical Center in Torrance 
are experieiKing summertime blood 
shortages, according to employees m 
both offices 

"We're just barely keeping up." 
Mid Barbara Willahan. the supervi- 
sor of the UCLA blood center 
Despite the shortage, no surgeries 
■t the UCLA medical center have 



been canceled, she added 

But the situation is different out 
side Los Angeles area shortages are 
only part of a nationwide blood 
shortage, which has reportedly 
caused many non-emergency surg- 
eries to be postponed. 

While blood supply is increasingly 
limited, blood is in greater demand 
as medical technology advances and 
more surgeries are taking place 

And the LA areas surrounding 
UCLA may be worse off than other 
places 

Southern California is hit harder 
by Mood shortages than other 
regions of the country, like the 
Midwest. Willahan said, because 
man^ of these areas do not have the 
large medical centers that Los 



Angeles does 

Willahan said the number of 
donors at UCLA is down in pari 
because school is not in full .session, 
and many people don't have time, or 
arc not here, to donate in the sum- 
mer. 

"We don't have our students as 
much and we don't have our employ 
ees here as much either." she said 

Meanwhile Dorothy Sorja. a med- 
ical technologist at the Harbor- 
UCLA Medical Center, acknowl- 
edging the current shortage, said she 
has seen similar iKCurrences in the 
past. 

"I've been here P years and this 
has probably happened every year." 
she said. "h"s part of the normal 
cycle*" 



But Willahan said the current 
shortage is more than just a seasonal 
down-turn 

Typically blood shortages are 
common when people arc busy 
around the Fourth ol July. Labor 
Day and the winter holidays Bui 
Willahan said usually the number of 
donors picks up this time of year. 
after a brief decline early in the 
month 

"This year were not seeing a 
recovery," she said 

The increasing number i>r qualifi- 
cations a dontir must meet bclore 
giving bliwd limits the field ol poten- 
tial donors Increasing qualificationN 
may be contributing to current short- 



Sw 



15 



By 

Daily Bniin Contnbutor 

Woiltin^ tn ivumuj iJ H dtsctwrr vh 
HIV vaccine tor human>. I C San 
Francisco scientists have dc\ eloped ii 
vaccine prtitecting monkevs Irom 
transmitting a virus closcK rdaled lo 
HIV 

The viruN that the rescirchers in 
San Francisco were working with is 
Simian Immunodeficiency Virus 
which can kill a monkey in under 
three years 

In studies that lasted for just under 
a year. Dr Raul .\ndino. an ass(Kiate 
professor at UCSF. and Dr Mark B 
Feinberg, a former assistant proleMM)r 
at UCSF. tested the vaccine which 
combines parts of a widely-iiscd oral 
polio vaccine with genetic fragments 
of SIV The monkeys thai were miect- 
ed with the vaccine containing S!\ 
remained healthy for a year 

In recent years, work un a potential 
HIV \accine has shifted Ukus from 
developing antihtKlics m the bk>od- 
streani lo protecting the body at the 
points of infection the mucosal sur- 
taces of the rectum and genitals 

By using the polu> vaccine, the sci- 
entists t(H>k advantage of its ability to 
trigger .i strong immune response at 
the mucosal surfaces 

The promising outcome has scien- 
tists upbeat about prospects for devel- 
oping a successful vaccine 

"There is logic m going with some 
thing that is proven." said Dr Peter 
Anton at UCLA s Center for Hl\ 
and Digestive Diseases, speaking on 
the use oi the polm \accine The big 
development is that this had monkeys 
that showed no infection ' 

Tempering his enthusiasm hi 
added that the manner m which HIV 
mutates makes il difficult l«> concen- 
trate on any one vaccine 

"No one would take bets because- 
the viniN IS so diflKuli and evolving." 
he said 

Charles Price an assiKialc of 
\nton. who is currently helping to 
organi/e the v olunteer campaign lor a 
similar study at I C'L A. pointed to the 
close course of SIV in monkeys and 
fll\ m hununs as reason tti regard 

W VKCINC. paft 12 



2 Monday, July 23. 2001 



Daily Brum Newt 





NTiY Briefs 



Helicopter crashes 
on Medical Center 

A helicopter crashed on the 
Medical Center landing pad as it 
attempted to take ofl after an organ 
delivcr\ Salurda> al 1 am No one 
was injured 

The helicopter, carrying a five-per- 
son I CLA heart and lung transport 
leatTi. returned from a trip to Fresno 
with u lung to be transplanted into a 
I CLA student The team and lun^ 
arrived safely, but when the heli- 
c(»pter tried to takeoff again, it 
crashed 

It was a hot landing the rolar 
was still on.' said team member Paul 
i.ilwin a 2(K»I microbiolog\ alum- 
nus "Wc went downstairs, and he 
crashed ' 

Helmet Aviation Services could 
not be reached for comment 

According Litwin. there arc iwi> 
probable scenarios explaining the 
cause o! the crash the rotar broke or 
the helicopter to»>k oft on its own as 
the pilot checked an open dot»r 

I ( PD IS still investigating the 
cause 

Debris wa> scattered at the scene 
and a small fire was extinguished, 
though the pilot sustained onlv minor 
iniuries 

Driver of victims 
unable to find ER 

A driver of a shuttle van was 
unable to locate the I'CLA Medical 
C enter emergencv room while 
attempting to transp*>rt four shoot- 
ing victims to the hospital earlier this 
mv>nth 

According to Los Angeles Police 
Department Detective Ron Phillips, 
someone m an unknown vehicle 
Tired several shots into the victims" 
shuttle van at approximately 2 30 
am on Monday July 9 on Century 
Park East and South Santa Monica 

One 2f>-year-old victim died and 
three others were injured 

Phillips confirmed that the driver 
of the shuttle van said he could not 
find the ER entrance but could not 
sav whether the victim would have 
survived if he had arrived at the hos- 
pital earlier 
\^LCordmg to Phillips, the van's 
driver slopped ai the .luics Stem Lye 



Institute after searching for the 
emergcnc> room 

The victims were transported 
from there to the emergency room 
for treatment 

The shooting occurred after a 
fight in the Century Club, a popular 
Century City night club, but officials 
do not know if the two events are 
related. Phillips said 

But the club s general manager. 
Brian Sayers. said the shooting 
stemmed from an argument in the 
parking lot of the club 

Emergency Medical Services 
Director Marshall Morgan said he 
has never heard of a similar situation 
when people could not locale the 
emergency room 

The best thing to happen when 
someone is injured is to rely on the 
paramedic system. ' Morgan said 
'Most members of the public know 
about the pre-hospital care system " 

The LAPD is still investigating 
the shooting and does not have any 
suspects yet 

i 

Mexico City next 
site for UC office 

The lie regents decided July 19 to 
erect an international I'C olTice in 
Mexico City to strengthen ties with 
the universitv in Mexico 

"The creation of the C asa de 
( alifornia will enable the university 
to enhance its relationships with 
Mexican universities, government 
and industry" said Juan-Vicente 
Palerm. director of VC MEXUS. a 
multi-campus research establish- 
ment that centers on Mexico. 
Mexican Americans and L S rela- 
tions with the country 

"Casa de California will be an 
excellent place for the best minds 
from both nations to work together 
to research and solve issues of com- 
mon concern." Palerm added 

The new office will be the site for 
an Education Abroad Program for 
global student constituents and a UC 
Relations office to kick start an 
alumni association 

UCLA dictionary 
has the word 'yo' 

t hillax." the most recent L CLA 
slang dictionary is on the shelves at 



Deal^Day 




rOMOOACNI 



SUPER SUSHI 



s ptv Sushi ami C alilomi.i Roll 

SI f-.xira 

Spav Tuna Roll 

>w ptgf I J li)r iwm- iiiliinB*K>n 




the campus bookstore 

•UCLA Slang 4," the latest edi- 
tion in the UCLA Linguistic 
Departments long-running Slang 
Project. IS put together every four 
years in part by Pamelo Munro's 
Slang seminar students. 

For a quarter, the mostly under- 
graduate class members rack their 
brains for expressions as well as 
question their peers to produce in a 
1 30-page dictionary 

Words like "wifebeater" and "sin"" 
are common expressions among the 
student population and are docu- 
mented in the dictionary 

Munro said in a statement that 
many of the words and phrases that 
first appear in ""UCLA Slang'" resur- 
face m movies and spread across the 
country. 

"A lot of slang origmates on the 
West Coast and migrates eastward. " 
said Munro. the dictionary's editor 
and an expert in more than 2.3 Native 
American and pre-Columbian lan- 
guages 

For example, "monet." an adjec- 
tive for a female who - like an 
Impressionist painting ^ looks better 
at a distance than up close, appeared 
in the film "Clueless " two years after 
being published in the dictionary in 
1993 and then reappeared in 1997 
edition 

Trying to define the KlOO current 
slang expressions in the new dictio- 
nary gave the student authors a 
grammar les.son as well. Munro said 
in a statement 

UCB studies vision 
loss of diabetics 

Small, barely detectable, changes 
in the retina may predict the onset of 
vision loss in people with diabetes and 
allo^ for early treatment, if a study 
beginning this summer at UC 
Berkeley's School of Optometry, is 
successful 

Preliminary tests have found a 
striking relationship between these 
small changes and existing eye dam^ 
age 

Eye complications caused by dia- 
betes arc the leading cause of blind- 
ness in the United States among 
adults ages 25-74 

Compiled from Daily Bruin staff and 
wire reports. 



Viewpoint 



i6 



Alts & Enteitainment 20 
Bruin Movie Guide 2 2 

Classifieds 27 



Crossword Puzzle 




Correctiofis 

•Mike Chne s name was misspetted in 'Conflict antes over student media 
audit." (hiews. July. 16) 

Adam SkaJman's name was misspetled m Tiis column ''Sdciety could u«e 
basic cable rebirth." (Viewpoint. July 16) 

A person in the photo that ran with the story "Connecting through the 
arts." (News. July 9) is misidentified The girl on the right is Dumikatso 
Mangena. 



1 



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The Owty Brum (BSM lOM 5M0) n published and copyiiftaHd by the ASUCLA 
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Daily Brum News 



Monday. J uh rv 'i(M)l 7> 



WORLD & NATION 




Ihe Ais<x mm I'rns 



Demonstrators smash windows in downtown Genoa, Italy on Friday, 
July 20, as protests against the Group of Eight summit turned violent. 

Summit protests end 
in destruction, death 



City vandallzecl, 
one killed outside Italy's 
Group of Eifijht m< 



The Associated Press 

GENOA. Italy Broken glass, 
spent tear ga& canisters and smashed 
vcllow cobblestones littered this sea- 
side city Sunda>. the streets finally 
tranquil after two days o4 anti-gkibal- 
ization protests that left one dead and 
nearly 5(X) injured 

Almost IKO people, including at 
least three L' S citizens, were arrest- 
ed in police sweeps that continued 
into the early hours of Sunday Some 
face serious criminal charges that 
could be leveled even as they lie m 
hospital beds, injured in street battles 
that raged outside the summit of 
industrial powers. 

In nearly two years of such clashes 
on the sidelines of world gatherings, 
these were by far the most intense, 
and the Tirst to resuh in a fatality - a 
23-year-old marcher shot dead by 
paramilitary police during Friday's 
fighting 

As many as 100.000 marchers took 
to the streets to press environmenul. 
social and economic causes mainly 
Imked to global trade and its fallout, 
the group of young anarchists who 
confronted police with rocks and fire- 
bombs constituted perhaps a few 



thousand 

Demonstrators pointed to police 
heavy-handedness as the cause of the 
mayhem 

"I think II Duce (Mussolini) would 
%ivc handled it better." said 2K-year- 
oid Italian protester Marco 
Saladinitria as he boarded a train out 
of Genoa 

Tens of thousands of protesters 
embarked on a mass exodus even 
before the summit ended, on special- 
ly chartered trains or by car and bus 

Premier Silvio Berlusconi had 
hoped the Group of Eight summit 
would showcase this proud onetime 
city-state, but he spent Sunday tour- 
ing neighborhoods battered by not- 
ing 

When Berlusconi visited City Hall 
to hear pleas from Mayor Guiseppc 
Pericu for reconstruction aid. some 
neighbors stuck their heads out of 
apartments to yell al him, "ShanK. 
shame, shame!" 

Italy's Cabinet was to weigh an 
emergencv $45 million reconstruc- 
tion package Monday 

A soccer stadium that had served 
as a tent dormitory for protesters was 
padlocked and deserted on Sunday. 
Outside were heaps of makeshift 
body armor, fashioned from card- 
board, foam padding and mineral- 
water bottles 

A few hours after the summit lead- 
ers left town, workers began disman- 



Sce 



12 



WORLD A NATION BRIEFS 



Teams work to get aid to 




• III 



victims 



INDIA: Previous etTorts 
to distribute medicines 
have been unsuccessful 



By 

The Associated Press 

BHl BANESWAR. India 
Relief workers battled .swirling cur- 
rents to take medicines and aid to 
millions oi people in the flcHHl-rav- 
aged eastern stale of Orissa 
Governmcni officials admitted 
Sunda> that earlier efforts to do so 
had faikd. 

Waters from overflowing rivers 
prevented medical teams from 
reaching many remote villages as 
reports of diarrhea, jaundice and 
malaria poured in to the control 
room set up by the state government 
to oversee relief and rescue efforts 



Nearly one million 
people are living on 
the rooftops of their 

homes or on trees. 



On Sunday, the death toll from 
the fltHxls climbed to 55. although 
unofficial sources, including l(Kal 
newspapers, put the figure at 70 
More than 8 million people have 
been affected by the floods which 
have left millions homeless this 
week Nearly one miHion people are 
living on the rooftops of their homes 
or on trees 




A father takes his sons to safer ground on a makeshift boat as flood 
waters rise in the village of Govindpur in India. 



Medical learns had not been able 
to reach many ol the marm»ned vil- 
lages as late as one week after they 
were cut ofl by the rising waters ol 
the Mahanadi river and its man\ 
tributaries that traverse the state, 
said MM Das. a doctor in charge of 
the health control room m the slate 



capital. Bhubunes>^jr 

Two members ol a health team 
were killed Sundav when their boat 
capsi/ed in the Bhargavi ri\cr in 
Pun. one of the worst-hit districts of 
the state Five members ol the same 



See 



Nf*M 



Eoonomy spurs tuition hike in state schook 



mufcr^' Universities 
will try to increase aid 
in order to be accessible 



By 

The Associated Press 

When University of Tennessee 
trustees raised the school's tuition 19 
percent. Angela Leonard got scared 

The factory worker s daughter sa^ 
her 2001-02 tuition jump $422. to 
$.'^,2.^. when the board made its deci- 
sion Wednesday That pushed student 



loans past S<).000 for the incoming 
senior, who already works nearly full 
time as a waitress, baby-sitter and life- 
guard to suppon herself 

Her career goal is public relations 
Now she worries about the price she's 
paid for an education to get into that 
fieU. 

"What if I don't get a great job 
starting out"^" Leonard said 

Leonard's worries are shared by 
many college students and families 
around the country as tuition hikes at 
some puNic institutions hit diHible- 
digit percentages lor in-statc students 
(hit-of-statc students arc paying costs 



that rival private schix>ls. 

Those private colleges and univer- 
sities are reporting smaller increases - 
in the4..S percent to 5 5 percent range 
much the same as the past five years 

While annual increases in college 
bills have become the norm, it s par- 
ticularly acute this year m parts of the 
country suffering most from the 
nation's economic slowdown, experts 
say. 

Soine examples 

• Clemson I niversity trustees 
raised annual tuition for all students 



Plan aims to restrict 
small arms trade 

UNFTED NATIONS The first UN con- 
fereiK-e to curb the billion-dollar-a-vear illegal 
trafficking in small arms ended Saturday with 
189 nations agreeing iw a watcrcckkwn plan 
Washington wanted ^ with calls to limit weapon 
sales and restrict civilian gun ownership 
expunged. 

The plan calls for governments to ensure 
manufacturers mark and keep records of small 
arms so illegally trafficked weapons can be 
traced 

Governments arc urged to impiement poli- 
cies to prevent the illicit trafTicking of small arms 
and to make the illegal nuinufacture. pos.Hession. 
stockpiling and trade of small arms a criminal 
ofTenae tt calls for surplus stocks to be 
public awareness campaigns on the 
of the trade. .and mtenurtioruil 
for disarming combatants after con- 
flicts 



President halts his 
impeachment 

JAKARTA, Indonesia Indonesia s 
embattled President .Abdurrahman Wahid 
issued a decree on Monday to suspend the legis- 
lature and block his imminent impeachment, 
and called for new elections to he held in one 
year 

Wahid's nationally televised address came 
hours after dozens of tanks rumbled past the 
presidential palace Sunday, as a constitutKtnal 
crisis gripped the world's fourth most populous 
country already wracked by separatist violence 
Earlier Sunday, two bombs rocked the capital. 
injunng more than 70 peopte. 

Inside the palace. Wahid. Indonesia's first 
democratically elected leader m more than four 
decadti cribd on the army and police to main- 
tain law and order and to prevent the impeach- 
ment hearing from proceeding on Monday 
Wahid has been summoned to appear at the 
iiWy Monday to answer the charges of cor- 




ruption and incompetence 

Slow reaction nuiy 
have caused deaths 

A K ASH I, Japan The call from a private 
security compan\ v^.is frantic Thousiinds had 
mobbed an overpass after a fireworks display in 
western Japan and lives were m danger 

Then came the police response let s wait and 
see In tht>se crucial minutes 10 people - most ol 
them children were killed and IP others 
injured when a crowd surged onto the overpass 
Saturday night in Akashi, a suburb of Kobe 
about }*)() miles southwest of Tokyo 

The accident - the worst overcrowding 
tragedy in Japan in decades has focused 
intense scrutiny on allegedly lax crowd control 
and what some say was a stow policT response 

Witnes.ses said officials seemed unprepared 
for the crowd ol 1 3(),0(K) people, and a reptin by 
a security company hn^ for the event said 
guards called the police for backup and were 



turned dt>wn 

Cardiologist on trial for 
apartheid crimes. 

JOHANNESBIRG. South Africa 
Witnesses have talked of creating poistined 
chcKolates and clothes, lacing it letter with 
anthrax and releasing cholerii in ihc water supply 
at a refugee camp 

Wouter Bas.s<in, the so-called "Dr Death." 
lakes the stand Mtmday to lace questions ab«>ut 
the chemical and biological warfare program 
that allegedly searched for ways to kill bliick ene- 
mies of the state during apartheid 

Testimony has itKluded accounts of salmonel- 
la sugar and an experiment where naked Macks 
were snKared with a gel to test whether il could 
kill - and allegedly injected with fatal dt>ses of 
muscle relaxants and dumped m the (x:ean when 
It didn'i 



CompNed from Daily Bruin Wire 



Monday. July 2S. 2(H)1 



Daily Bruin Newt 



Leaders discuss nudear arsenal cuts 



PUTIN: Disagreements 
still exist over timetable, 
VNhat weapons to let po 



By 

The Associated Press 

CihNiOA llaK Scekinp a posi- 
( old NVar lurmula lor arms control. 
Prcsidcnl Bush and Russian 
Prcsidcnl \ ladimii Putin pledged 
Sunda\ in pursue deep cuts in their 
nuclear arsenals and link the i>t]en- 
•>ivi' weapons talks to tougher negoti- 
ations .>\cr Bush s missile defense 
plans 

llieii ditlerenccs still deep, bolh 
leader^ hailed the surprise announcc- 
Mieni III this medieval Mediterranean 
port >.it\ as ,1 step toward torgmg a 
>ironi!ci I S -RiisMaii relationship 

Hush li.i^ anihiinHis hut untested 
plan- K>t .1 dclensc svsteni that could 
[M otcci I tic I lilted Siate^ and Us allies 
1 1. 1111 missiles launched h\ Iraq. 
North korc.i or other rogue stales 
He ti.is s.uieln U' link olVensive and 
dclciisc v\ capons strategies since 
carK 111 Ills presidential campaign 

I tic two go hand-in-hand in order 
ii- sci up .1 new strategic tramework 



lor peace." Bush said ai a news cim- 
lerentc lt>llowing their second one- 
on-i)nc meeting I believe that we 
will ci>me up with an accord " 

StH>n alter he became president. 
Bush directed the Pentagon to consid- 
er further cuts in nuclear weapons, 
while Putin has suggested reductions 
ID l..*»0() warheads each about onc- 
fitth of" the current IS stockpile 

Tltough skeptical of Bush s missile 
shield dreams, the Russian president 
said nuclear cuts would make the 
world a safer place There has to be 
ahs«>lutel> no doubt that this is going 
ti> happen. " Putin said 

But there is still significant doubt 
about how Putin wtH respond it an 
agreemeni is not reached before the 
I inited States begins anti-missile tests 
prohibited bv the 29-year-i>ld Anti- 
Ballisiic Missile Treat\ The Pentagon 
says those tests are just months away 
and will proceed over Russia s objec- 
tions 

In addition. Bush and Putin did 
not agree on the si7e of nuclear cuts, a 
timetable (»r what weaptms would be 
involved And there was no evidence 
that Bush made headwav in convinc- 
ing Puim that a IS missile defense 
system is not a strategic threat to 
Russia 



The diflerences in approach on a 
couple of topics IS still there." Putin 
said 

Republican and Democratic lead- 
ers in Congress praised Bush s action 

"This implies, at least to me. this 
administration will not break out of 
the ABM Treaty in the meantime 
And I think that's very good news." 
said Sen Joseph Biden. the 
DemcK'ratic chairman of the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee, on 
CNNs "Late Edition " 

With Bush at his side. Putin point- 
edly declined to repeat his long-stand- 
ing position that scuttling the ABM 
would trigger an arms race Instead, 
the Russian suggested the resue might 
become moot 

"If. as we undersKKtd from each 
other today, we are ready to look at 
the issue of offensive and defensive 
systems together as a set. we might 
not ever need to \ook at that option," 
he said 

L.S otTicials traveling with Bush 
said they believe Putin was referring 
to the possibility that the linited 
States and Russia could come to 
terms on a new defense agreemeni 
before Bush has to vH>late or scuttle 



Sm 



pa^elO 



Newspaper report cals Megan's Law flawed 




OFFENDERS: S\stem in 
Orange (loiint) found to 
contain inaccuracies 



The Associated Press 

SAM A ANA The ( alilornia 
version ol Megan s Law, designed to 
warn residents when convicted sex 
offenders move nearby, is filled with 
flaws and often breaks down, 
according io a newspaper report 

The law was passed by the stale 
legislature in 1W6 and ti>ok effect 
the lollowing year It is named after 
"'-vear-old Megan Kanka, a New 
lerscN girl who was raped and mur- 
dered b\ a paroled molester living 
across the street from her 

I he law enables residents \o 



check names and IcKations of sex 
offenders on a database It also 
encourages police to warn neighbors 
when particularly dangerous oflend- 
ers move into their neighborhood 

The Orange County Regi.ster 
reported Sunday that police are los- 
ing track of offenders and rarely 
alert the public even when the 
offenders live near children or 
women 

The system also relies loo heavily 
on the honesty of the criminals, the 
investigation found 

There also were flaws and miscal- 
culations found in the way the stale 
registers and follows its 88.77.^ sex 
oftenders 

The problems include 

• Sex offenders failing to tell 
police when they miwc and if they 
are commuting new sex crimes 



• A CD-ROM of registered 
offenders statewide that is often 
inaccurate 

• Errors in Orange ( ounty that 
are especially glaring among more i 
dangerous criminals of }2 high-risk 
rapists and pedophiles in the county. 

\t have inaccurate entries in the 
state database 

■ A public that does not use the 
system as much as anticipated 

Jennifer Shaver. 33, of Orange 
County, said she had a sex offender 
living nearby and befriending her 
children The mother of lour said she 
recently had befriended a neighbor ! 
who turned oul to be a rapist 

" I am just sick about the fact that 
he hugged my children." Shaver told 
the Register j 



Palestinian children carry a do<l wrapped in a Palestinian flag 
representing tbree-month-old Diya Tmaizi, killed near Hebron July 1 9. 



Israeli police search for 
culprits in re<Dent attacks 



»: Authorities say Jewish extremists are to 
blame for roadside ambush in West Bank last week 



9^V aHHI^ 



12 



By 

The Associated Press 

JERUSALEM - Israeli police 
said Sunday they were searching for 
Jewish extremists believed responsi- 
ble for several shooting attacks on 
Palestinian civilians, including a 
deadly roadside ambush last week in 
the West Bank. 



Israeli authorities said they wanl- 
' ed to quickly break up the extremist 
Jewish cell because further attacks, 
such as the shooting in Hebron that 
left three Palestinians dead, could 
lead to an escalation in violence thai 
began 10 months ago. So far. no one 
has been arrested 



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Dpily Bruin Newi 



Monday. July 23. 2001 



STATE & LOCAL 



Interest groups push for initiative to alow term extensions 



Supporters claim 
lawmakers need time to 
master complex issues 



Tiie Assodaied Pies 

SACRAMENTO Eleven years 
4^ Cahfommns adopted term limits, 
a new bafiot battle is emerging over 
whe th e r voters should be able to give 
their state legislators extra tinK in 
office. 

About a dozen interest groups, 
urged by key lawmakeni. are trying to 
put an initiative on the March ballot to 
aHow legislators to run for up to four 
more years m office if enough voters 
sign petitions supporting the move. 

Term-limit advocates call the initia- 
tive a deceptive attempt b\ lawmakers 
to weaken the tough term limits voters 
approved in 1W() 

Currently, lawmakers can serve up 
to three two-year terms in the AssembK 
and up to two four-year terms in the 
state Senate, although thi)se limits can 
be stretched if someoite is elected ini- 
tially to fill a midterm vacanc> 

Initiative suppt>rters say its a '"mod- 
eat adjustment" that would improve 
operations at the Capitol 

°l don't think the term-limit people 
have to look at this at some radical 
attack, it isn't," said supponer Walter 
Zelman. president of the California 
Asaocialion of Health Plans. 

The initiative would allow a senator 
to seek one more term and an 
Aaembly member to run for two more 
if enough voters in their districts signed 
petitions backing the extension 

The number of sigiuitures would 
have to equal at least 20 percent of the 
votes cast for that office in the previous 
general election, an inituitive support- 
ers say win be difTicuh to reach 

Term limits, according to the initia- 
tive's preamble, have "reinvigorat«l 



the political process," but the propoaed 
measure would let ~k few specwlly 
skilled and popular lawirwkers" finish 
important work 

But Paul Jacob, national director of 
U.S. Term Limits, conteiKk that "virtu- 
ally every legislator will be able to get 
those signatures" because of their abili- 
ty to raise money to pay sigiutture col- 
lectors. 

"They are slicker and smarter to try 
to do It through the initiative pr(x:ess, 
but the folks behind this are all the same 
legislators who have been against term 
limits from day one," he said 

Karen Caves, a spokeswoman for 
the initiative's sponsors, says the mea- 
sure lb "really about restoring local con- 
trol to voters" 

"If the people want it. they can have 
It," she said "If they don't want it they 
don't have to have it" 

Caves says Howard Owen, presi- 
dent of the Consumer Federation of 
California and a member of the board 
of the Congress of California Seniors, 
IS "really the source" of the initiative 

But Sen Don Perau, CVOakland. 
said he asked Owens and others 
involved in the campaign to spearhead 
It He also said he provided the cam- 
paign with opinion polls and other 
research, 

"The only people opposing this pub- 
licly don't live in the state, don t work in 
the state and earn their living keeping 
term limits campaigns in place, " Perata 
said 

So far those backing the measure 
include some of the Capitol's most 
power lobbying groups - the California 
Medical Association. Consumer 
Attorneys, the California Retailers 
Association and the California 
Ciwrectional Peace Officers, according 
to Caves 

Supporters also include tfie 
Congress of California Seniors. 
California Prof